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Scanning Rome’s Invisible City | BBC One

Scanning Rome’s Invisible City | BBC One | Navigate | Scoop.it
BBC’s ONE’s 60 minute special Rome’s Invisible City follows ScanLAB Projects and presenters Alexander Armstrong and Dr Michael Scott as they explore the hidden underground secrets of Ancient Rome.

The show explores Roman infrastructure and ingenuity, all below ground level. We journeyed via the icy, crystal clear waters of subterranean aqueducts that feed the Trevi fountain and two thousand year old sewers which still function beneath the Roman Forum today, to decadent, labyrinthine catacombs. Our laser scans map these hidden treasures, revealing for the first time the complex network of tunnels, chambers and passageways without which Rome could not have survived as a city of a million people. 

 

 


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A 100-year Old Debate: Science or Art in Data Visualization?

A 100-year Old Debate: Science or Art in Data Visualization? | Navigate | Scoop.it

When did people first start writing about effective ways of visualizing data?

Your answer might go back to the 1980s (Edward Tufte, perhaps) or even further back into the 1960s (Jacques Bertin, maybe). Few people would go back so far as 100 years ago. That’s right: one hundred years ago...


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Google Public Data Explorer

Google Public Data Explorer | Navigate | Scoop.it
The Google Public Data Explorer makes large datasets easy to explore, visualize and communicate. As the charts and maps animate over time, the changes in the world become easier to understand.

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Mary Starry's curator insight, November 30, 2013 9:01 PM

Some of the charts and maps do relate to medical issues, such as incidence of influenza, new infectious disease outbreaks, mortality from automobile accidents.  A useful resource to keep in mind.

 

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The Best Infographics of the Year: Nate Silver on the 3 Keys to Great Information Design

The Best Infographics of the Year: Nate Silver on the 3 Keys to Great Information Design | Navigate | Scoop.it

The second installment of The Best American Infographics 2014 (public library) has an introduction by master-statistician Nate Silver and fifty-eight examples of stellar information design shedding light on such diverse topics as the history of space exploration, the sleep habits of famous writers, the geography of where gay people stay in the closet, the comparative shapes and sizes of major baseball parks, and the social network of jazz musicians in the 1920s. 

Silver, the author of The Signal and the Noise, considers the two factors that make an infographic compelling — providing a window into its creator’s mind and telling a story that “couldn’t be told in any other way.


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Marco Favero's curator insight, October 21, 2014 6:14 PM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

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Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City

Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City | Navigate | Scoop.it
The GSAPP’s Cloud Lab teams up with neurologists and the design institute to track how urban environments can make people relaxed or tense.

This spring, the Cloud Lab at Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute tackled the challenge of assessing and mapping how people respond to their environment as a part of Van Alen’s Elsewhere series on wellness in the city.

Instead of the typical focus groups, however, the researchers tracked brainwaves to gauge the mental activities of nearly 100 volunteers; using electroencephalography-based (EEG) measurements and the GPS tracking app, the research team collected more than 1 gigabyte of data over 200 walking sessions that, in theory, create a snapshot of a day-in-the-life of the neighborhood’s mental states. 

Presenting the data in a manner that retained its spatial qualities required the researchers to develop their own software for visualization. At a public follow-up presentation in May, the team presented the simplified data on a 3D map of DUMBO. Areas in cyan indicate places in which participants were in a more meditative and relaxed state, while areas in red indicate places where participants had a more focused or heightened sense of awareness...


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Bhopkins's curator insight, August 22, 2014 10:53 AM

"Architects and planners could employ the technology during post-occupancy walkthroughs or preliminary design presentations."