Navigate
Follow
Find tag "agriculture"
1.7K views | +3 today
Navigate
Explore places, objects and phenomenons.
Curated by Suvi Salo
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops

Here's what 9,000 years of breeding has done to corn, peaches, and other crops | Navigate | Scoop.it
Corn, watermelon, and peaches were unrecognizable 8,000 years ago.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 1:25 PM

I think the term 'artificial' in the image might be misleading and it depends on your definition of the word.  Humans have been selectively breed plants and animals for as long as we've been able to domestic them; that is a 'natural' part of our cultural ecology and has lead to great varieties of crops that are much more suitable for human consumption than what was naturally available.  Long before climate change, humans have been actively shaping their environment and the ecological inputs in the systems with the technology that their disposal.  This is a good resource to teach about the 1st agricultural revolution.     


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | Navigate | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."

 


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, July 6, 12:09 PM

Such studies of the agriculture around the world are essential. The way we are doing agriculture to support seven billion people now, peaking at 9-10 billion in another 60 years, it is clear that we are putting severe strains on the environment.  But we have grown lazy, and we are doing it all wrong.

 

We CAN drastically reduce the amount of meat we consume, and thus quickly reduce the amount of arable land we need.  We CAN grow plants in ways that actually sequester more carbon and improve the soil it over time rather than erode and degrade.  And we CAN in fact grow all the food we need in the space we live in, thus enabling us to recycle all the water used as well, which is mostly just lost in evaporation. 

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 5:52 AM

Vital debate for the future

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:44 PM

APHG-U2