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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | Navigate | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


Via Seth Dixon
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aitouaddaC's curator insight, May 2, 8:44 AM
On pourra voir aussi , en français  et en allemand :  http://ddc.arte.tv/nos-cartes/le-transport-maritime-coeur-de-la-mondialisation
South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Map Projection Transitions

Map Projection Transitions | Navigate | Scoop.it

"In some ways, all 2D maps of Earth are interrupted at some point, even if it’s just along the antimeridian at 180°. Interruptions are often in areas of less interest e.g. oceans for a land-focused map."


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Lilydale High School's curator insight, September 3, 2015 6:01 AM

New ways to see the world.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:33 AM

map projections

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:23 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

No screenshot could do justice to this animation.  It transforms a map of the world from one map projection to another, and in the 5 second interval it 'spins the globe' to give you a sense of the the spatial distortions inherent in all projections.  This is but one of the many visualizations fromJason Davies mapping project.   

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Living in the Age of Airplanes

"LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world." airplanesmovie.com


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 1, 2015 12:45 PM

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, video, National Geographic, visualization.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:41 AM

Summer reading KQ3 What are the major contributing factors to environmental change today? key concept of transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:11 AM

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, video, National Geographic, visualization.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Sustainability in education
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If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas

If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas | Navigate | Scoop.it

What if all the ice melted in the world? Now whether you believe global warming happens because of human activities or naturally is another debate. The questions “How would the world look if ALL the ice melted?” How much would the sea rise by? What would be the average temperature on Earth? are of interest to everyone.

Trust National Geographic not only to capture such questions in the best manner possible but also to visualize it in such geoawesome manner! Here’s the super interesting map by National Geographic “IF ALL THE ICE MELTED“!

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, National Geographic, climate change, water, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon, Aki Puustinen
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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 5, 2015 9:05 AM

Climate change is all about the "Pendulum Effect," where the extremes is what matters, not so much the median or average. The average may fluctuate some, but the real problem comes when the weather goes haywire. Too much water can be as destructive as too little water, and this doesn't only happen in time but in space as well, where regions get too much of one and too little of the other. We'll see strips of drought and strips of wetness, strips of cold and strips of heat, like bands across regions and across the planet. If he ice melts, the sea and fresh water strips in the ocean will keep the fresh water atop and it'll probably freeze in great bands in winter and provoke an extreme albedo effect cooling down the planet radically followed immediately by a potential mini ice age.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 5, 2015 9:23 PM

Impact of climate change on landforms and landscapes 


The human causes and effects of landscape degradation (ACHGK051)

The ways of protecting significant landscapes (ACHGK052)



Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
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200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized

200 years of immigration to the U.S., visualized | Navigate | Scoop.it
Where have immigrants to the U.S. come from? Natalia Bronshtein, a professor and consultant who runs the blog Insightful Interaction, created this fascinating visualization of the number of immigrants to the U.S.

Via Seth Dixon
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David Holoka's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:36 AM

The statistics in this article shocked me. I already new America took in a large number of immigrants, but I thought most came illegally from Mexico. Instead, the immigrants we hold are very diverse in ethnicity.  

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:56 PM

Migration

Fred Issa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 4:24 PM

We tend to forget that the first real Americans were the Native American Indians. Immigration is a hotly discussed topic right now, but I wonder where we would be as a nation, if the original Native Americans told the settlers at Roanoke Island, the Chesapeake, and Plymouth Rock, that no, we are not allowing any foreigners to settle on our shores and land. Food for thought. Fred Issa,

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
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World Religions Astonishing Facts - YouTube

World Religions Christianity Islam Judaism Hinduism Sikhism Budhism Spread of Religions by time from 3000 BC to 2000 AD. Discover the origin of religions Per...

Via Seth Dixon
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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:58 AM

This video puts world religions in a more basic form. Shows the patterns that religions take on a global scale, outlining the most prominent and least prominent throughout the world. 

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from digital divide information
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People Movin'

People Movin' | Navigate | Scoop.it

"A visualization of migration flows"


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:09 PM

This is a great way to visualize global migration patterns.  Where are people migrating to Brazil coming from?  What countries are Brazilians migrating to?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every country.  


Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 8, 2013 4:14 AM

Es un grafic molt atractiu. Interessant per muntar treballs de grup, investigants païssos concrets

Peter Farárik's comment, February 8, 2013 9:20 AM
Perfect!
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Human Interest
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The Science behind Google Earth

The Science behind Google Earth | Navigate | Scoop.it

"Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models."


Via Seth Dixon, Jukka Melaranta
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Annenkov's curator insight, April 16, 2014 12:46 AM

This technology of visualization I would name "3D landscape"

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 16, 2014 8:40 PM

Tecnología para generar imágenes en 3D con Google Earth

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:06 PM

Google Earth has made the Earth easier to decipher and examine in a geographical sense of location and place by being able to see multiple layers. This article goes into the 3D designs and usage of aerial photography to create 3D images.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from All about Visualization & Storytelling
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14 World-Changing Data Visualizations from the Last 4 Centuries

14 World-Changing Data Visualizations from the Last 4 Centuries | Navigate | Scoop.it

Science may be difficult, but it doesn’t have to be ugly. These images, from a new exhibit at the British Library, show how beautiful scientific data can be.

The exhibit features classic illustrations dating to 1603, including John Snow’s map of London’s SoHo that’s credited with revealing a contaminated water pump as the source of a 1854 cholera outbreak. There also are beautiful modern visualizations of data from satellites and gene sequencers. The exhibit, Beautiful Science: Picturing Data, Inspiring Insight, runs through May 26.


Via Lauren Moss, Emeric Nectoux
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Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
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Mapping Rocky's Run

Mapping Rocky's Run | Navigate | Scoop.it

"As a kid, I grew up watching the Rocky movies, shadow boxing with my brothers and doing push-ups during the workout montages.  One on my favorite scenes was in Rocky II when Rocky runs through the whole city of Philadelphia, thronged by adoring fans as he runs to the top of the stairs to the Philadelphia Museum of Art (and yes, of course I re-enacted that scene when I was there)."


Via Seth Dixon
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 23, 2013 10:45 AM

My family and I have watched the Rocky series a handful of times, and a month or two ago, my grandmother called our house all frantically to let us know that "Rocky" was on TV, in case we wanted to watch it.  I used to be big into going for long walks across a few towns every night, and this article reminded me of some of the walks that I had been on, and have actually mapped out.  The expression "walking around in circles" does not fully apply to many places, because they have semi-straight roads and often have 90 degree intersections with other roads, which would make it walking in rectangular patterns.  I have walked well over 20 miles in a single night, and found myself exploring side roads and looking them up later on an online map of the area.  In this article, Rocky runs in a "circular" pattern, but from his house to the final steps that he runs up at a museum, rather than returning to his house.  In this map with the article, Rocky is shown as covering a large area on his run, without overlapping the same areas all that often.  "Rocky" is a series about achieving dreams and defying odds- actions that are different with different characters and different outcomes in every movie.  It makes sense that Rocky covers a little bit of the same ground twice, metaphorically in the movies, and literally on the map, but also that he achieves his destination after going the long and difficult distance rather than a bee-line to the destination, that would defeat the depth of the story.  Rocky's run is symbolic as a journey mentally, physically, and spiritually, and is enforced by the route that he was found to have run, as analyzed by this article and its links.  While I found myself walking 15 miles to a place, and back in the same night, I was merely part of a cycle.  Rocky is a hero because he went the distance.

Expert's comment, September 25, 2013 10:08 PM
Good http://www.skoyun.com
Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 8:14 PM

I too loved this movie growing up. Everytime Rocky was brought up you always remebered the part when Rocky ran up the stairs to the statue after his long training run. Just from his run you see the type of community they lived in. His town was very rundown, but you still got a sense of community by the way people yelled and cheered for Rocky as he ran by. They may not have had much as a community, but they supported each other and took pride in their city. You were able to get all of this just from the different landmarks you saw Rocky pass by on his run. You may not think about it at the time, but the location and scenary really paints a picture of the type of lifestlye and culture Rocky grew up in, and what makes him the man that he is. That is all just from simply paying attention to the landmarks that he runs by. Location really effects a person and you can see that in this movie. Rocky was a fighter who never gave up. His community was the same way. And looking at the map I don't think I was would ever want to run that far. It appeared a lot shorter in the movie than it actually is!

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Wind Forecast

Wind Forecast | Navigate | Scoop.it
Ubercool wind animation all over the world. Wind and weather forecast for kiters, surfers, pilots and anyone else.

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 1, 2015 3:23 PM

With people on the East Coast concerned about the possible trajectories for Hurricane Joaquin, I think it is the right time to share this interactive map.  In the past I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a mesmerizing digital globe with wind data.  This new one though, includes multiple meteorological layers with forecasts for the next two weeks...very cool.     

Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, October 19, 2015 9:45 PM

Useful for examining wind power in various areas.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from visual data
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Here's Every Meteorite Fall on Earth in a Single Interactive Visualization

Here's Every Meteorite Fall on Earth in a Single Interactive Visualization | Navigate | Scoop.it

Ever wonder how many meteors have hit Earth? The Meteoritical Society is doing its best to keep track. And Javier de la Torre, co-founder of CartoDB, is helping us see the pure volume of hits (into the tens of thousands). His interactive visualization shows a heatmap of hits all over the world, letting you explore where and when meteorites fell, as well as their size and classification.


Via Lauren Moss
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Laura Brown's curator insight, May 25, 2015 4:14 PM

I wonder how much of this is biased by the lack of reporting (or over reporting) in some areas. 

AnalyticsInnovations's curator insight, June 5, 2015 7:09 AM

Example of data scientist faux pas:  Meteors choose to fall so unevenly...!

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from visual data
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A Single Day on the London Tube Condensed Into a 2-minute Visualization

A Single Day on the London Tube Condensed Into a 2-minute Visualization | Navigate | Scoop.it

Everyday an average of 3.5 million people ride the London tube. Where is everyone going, and when are the busiest times? 

Developer Will Gallia was curious to see it visualized, so he gathered a day’s worth of data and created a timelapse visualization...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Suvi Salo from visual data
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World's Largest Tree Of Life Visualizes 50,000 Species Over Time

World's Largest Tree Of Life Visualizes 50,000 Species Over Time | Navigate | Scoop.it

Temple University researchers recently put together the world's largest tree of life visualized across time. The family tree of living and extinct organisms encompasses 50,000 species—only a fraction of the world's history of life—and would easily take up hundreds of pages if laid out linearly. To fit their work onto a printed page, the researchers, led by evolutionary biologist S. Blair Hedges, instead decided to visualize the data as a spiral.


Via Lauren Moss
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Poetic NASA Visualization Shows How Everything Is Connected

Poetic NASA Visualization Shows How Everything Is Connected | Navigate | Scoop.it
NASA visualizes the 22,000 tons of life-giving dust that flows between Africa and South America.

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Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Education 2.0 & 3.0
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The World as 100 People | Visual.ly

The World as 100 People | Visual.ly | Navigate | Scoop.it
The World as 100 People. This idea has been around since 1990. This is my attempt at presenting the information.

Via Beth Dichter, Yashy Tohsaku
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Ryan Rejaei's curator insight, October 20, 2014 8:41 PM

So interesting. And easy to understand the information

Armando's curator insight, October 22, 2014 6:20 AM
The World as 100 People | Visual.ly
Becky Roehrs's curator insight, October 23, 2014 3:54 PM

If you want to see a detailed breakdown and find out where the data came from, here you go: http://www.100people.org/statistics_detailed_statistics.php

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See The Ancient Roots Of Modern Infographics In "Book Of Trees"

See The Ancient Roots Of Modern Infographics In "Book Of Trees" | Navigate | Scoop.it
Manuel Lima's The Book of Trees takes us back to the earliest, nature-inspired frameworks of data visualization.

The first great Age of Infographics took root 1,000 years ago inspired variously by quests to categorize scientific knowledge, organize Greco-Roman scholarship and, weirdly, trace family bloodlines so that aristocrats could avoid incest as defined by Vatican rule-makers.

 

Manuel Lima's illustrated history The Book of Trees (Princeton Architectural Press) chronicles how Medieval-era designers instinctively used trunk and branch diagrams to impose order on the explosion of new data. One millennium later, tree-based graphics continue to pack considerable punch as information delivery systems.


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Suvi Salo from EdTech Evolution - Mapping the Intersection of tech, innovation, and instruction
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Visual Music Search Engine

Visual Music Search Engine | Navigate | Scoop.it
Search for musical artists and discover similar singers and bands you never knew existed.

 

Welcome to MusicPlasma.com the original visual music mapping tool.  Music Plasma is a visual search service that allows music lovers to discover new bands and artists that are closely related to their favorites.  Our graphic interface lets you visualize how the groups are fused together. Just enter your favorite musical artist in the search bar below. A circle will appear on the music map. Click on it and chose expand to explore.


Via Dennis T OConnor, Dean J. Fusto
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, February 28, 2014 7:34 PM

Would students be more interested in learning how to search if they could be delving into music?

Charlie Dare's curator insight, March 2, 2014 11:55 PM

Maybe more interested in learning how to search if they could be delving into music?

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Leadership Think Tank
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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World | Navigate | Scoop.it
  If you're a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this c...

Via Beth Dichter, Aki Puustinen
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Olivier Aidyn's curator insight, August 16, 2013 12:44 AM

good work dude

Olivier Aidyn's comment, August 16, 2013 9:10 AM
Such a great infographics !
mtmeme's curator insight, August 16, 2013 10:31 AM

These are amazing!