Navigate
4.7K views | +0 today
Follow
Navigate
Explore places, objects and phenomenons.
Curated by Suvi Salo
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from STEM Connections
Scoop.it!

A Huge Library of NASA Space Photos to Use with Students via @medkh9

A Huge Library of NASA Space Photos to Use with Students via @medkh9 | Navigate | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Bonnie Bracey Sutton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Visual Design and Presentation in Higher Edcuation
Scoop.it!

Free: Download 5.3 Million Images from Books Published Over Last 500 Years - public domain (Open Culture)

Free: Download 5.3 Million Images from Books Published Over Last 500 Years - public domain (Open Culture) | Navigate | Scoop.it
Back in 2014, we brought to your attention an image archive rivaling the largest of its kind on the web: the Internet Archive Book Images collection at Flickr.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Kim Flintoff
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

22+ International Borders Around The World

22+ International Borders Around The World | Navigate | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:38 AM

Unit 4

Level343's curator insight, June 1, 2015 3:00 PM

Now that's cool!!

Dwane Burke's curator insight, June 3, 2015 6:16 PM

What do these say about the world?

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

22 International Borders

22 International Borders | Navigate | Scoop.it

"Brazil (top) and Bolivia (bottom)."


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 6, 2014 7:49 PM

Borders can tell us a great feel about the relationship beween the two  nations.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:52 PM

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:11 AM

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Navigate | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 2015 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Brazil and Europe

Brazil and Europe | Navigate | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 20, 2015 7:59 PM

I would say. Just imagine three mega cities like Rio de Janeiro, population 11,960,000 then Buenos Aires with a population of 13,530,000 and finally Sao Paulo with the Southern Hemisphere's largest metropolitan area with a population of 19,920,000 with 2 more Mega cities to be added by 2025.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, November 24, 2015 11:52 AM

I cannot believed the size of Brazil is at this scale because we don't hear a lot about it as being a world power. It shows that even though the country is this big, most of the land is uninhabitable due to the forests and geography of the land. In addition, from history class one cannot imagine a small country like Portugal controlled a big country as Brazil from the colonial times. Seeing this map with all these European countries inside of it with some space leftover, one can see the massive size of this South American country.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:47 PM
This link to show me a picture of Europe fitting in Brazil is astounding! I never realized how large this country was until it was put together like a puzzle for me. For a single country to be that large that you would be able to fit an entire continent inside is absurd. That really goes to show that looks can be deceiving.
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can you name these countries using only satellite photos?

Can you name these countries using only satellite photos? | Navigate | Scoop.it
The view from above.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Fathie Kundie's curator insight, January 8, 2015 10:03 AM

اختبار في الجغرافيا.. عبارة عن صور مأخوذة من الجو .. حاول التعرف على الدول والمدن

Brian Wilk's comment, January 31, 2015 9:34 PM
This is Australia I think.
Henk Trimp's comment, February 1, 2015 6:37 PM
It sure is!
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

12 best collections of historical images on Flickr

12 best collections of historical images on Flickr | Navigate | Scoop.it
The article lists most valuable photostreams created by institutions participating in The Commons project by Flickr.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Does Earth Look Like?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:18 AM

Mapping and Satellite Imagery

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video covers various topics important to mapping and satellite imagery (and alesson from an APHG teacher on how to use this video with other resources).  There is so much more to the world and space than what we can see see.  Chromoscope, referenced in the video, simulates other forms of energy on the electromagnetic spectrum besides just visible light.  This type of information is at the core of the science behind all of our satellite imagery.  This video also covers many map projection issues and highlights online resources to understand map distortion including:

Google’s Mercator Map PuzzleJason Davies’ interactive map projection websiteInteractive Gnomonic Projectionand the military's live rendering of what the Earth looks like right now.  
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | Navigate | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 2014 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:33 AM

unit 1

Sally Spoon's curator insight, June 2, 2015 4:01 PM

Really cool to look at. Interesting to use as writing starters.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

100 Great Teaching Images

100 Great Teaching Images | Navigate | Scoop.it

"Nature and humankind are both great artists, and when they join forces, amazing masterpieces can be produced. Today Bright Side has collected for you works in which the combined efforts of mother nature and photographic artists have captured magic moments showing the wondrous diversity of modern life and the natural world. Pictured above is the Westerdok District in Amsterdam."

 

Tags: images, art, landscape, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, December 30, 2016 7:57 AM
Why I love Geography!
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 9, 2:10 AM
100 Great Teaching Images
Marianne's curator insight, January 15, 11:00 PM

Something here for everyone and every situation...Brilliant!

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from Effective Technology Integration into Education
Scoop.it!

The British Library’s albums | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

The British Library’s albums | Flickr - Photo Sharing! | Navigate | Scoop.it

Via John Dalziel, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
John Dalziel's curator insight, July 6, 2015 3:04 AM

Over 1,000,000 images that practitioners and/or their learners can use for assignments, presentations, etc!
Well worth a closer look at this great resource!

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from digital citizenship
Scoop.it!

A million first steps - Digital scholarship blog

A million first steps - Digital scholarship blog | Navigate | Scoop.it
We have released over a million images onto Flickr Commons for anyone to use, remix and repurpose.

Via theo kuechel, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
more...
theo kuechel's curator insight, December 16, 2013 8:23 AM

All interested in educational curation should welcome  the news that the  British Library  has released  over a million images  into the public domain on  Flickr Commons  with "No Known Copyright Restrictions."  These images cover  a diverse range subjects, sourced from  17th, 18th and 19th century  book scans. The project  has already  been shared widely on twitter and  covered quite well in such as Open Culture and  Boing Boing, also my friend and colleague  Danny Nicholson; all have their own take on this project.


It is interesting to note that the image above has  already been viewed  over 39,000 times, (possibly because it is featured  on a significant number of  blogs and also the British Library's  own selected highlights set), whereas  a quick random dip into the collection suggests the average for most images is  currently around 3-4,000 views.  I think this suggests that social media channels  will be very important for disemination and engagement. I like the fact that with many of the images you can choose to see all the images from that particular book or download the entire book itself, to see all the them in context. The other piece of exciting news is that  the British Library  are developing a  crowd sourcing tools to increas the cultural and research value of these digital assets.


However even now there  is plenty of  opportunity  to engage with and contribute  -- anyone who is logged on to Flickr can tag the images - as Ben O'Steen suggests in a tweet  " mundane tags  - 'map', 'portrait', etc -  are very helpful!   Such activites are an  ideal focus for meaningful learning activties in the classroom, (as well as great fun).  Indeed, I have begun a small scale tagging exercise for places and topics that I am familar with such as Dumfries and Galloway. 


Finally -  many thanks to the good folks at the  British Library and Microsoft who had the vision to bring us these raw materials.  Let's see what we can build with them. If you have any thoughts on how you would use them, especially in education,  It would be great if you could share them as comments.
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Human Landscapes of Canada

Human Landscapes of Canada | Navigate | Scoop.it
Canada is a massive country, yet it has one of the lowest population densities in the world. Despite this, Canadians have made a wide impact on their land, much of it visible from aerial and satellite photography. Hydroelectric facilities, roads, mines, farms, ports, resource exploration, logging, canals, cities, and towns have altered much of the landscape over the years.

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 23, 2015 1:02 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 2015 11:20 AM

Un vrai plaisir

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:28 PM

This shows how even small populations can make a big impact on the world from the changes in urbanization.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Windows on Earth

Windows on Earth | Navigate | Scoop.it

"Windows on Earth is an educational project that features photographs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station.  Astronauts take hundreds of photos each day, for science research, education and public outreach.  The photos are often dramatic, and help us all appreciate home planet Earth.  These images  help astronauts share their experience, and help you see Earth from a global perspective."

 

Tags: images, art, space, remote sensing, geospatial.


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
tosserestonian's comment, January 18, 2015 11:26 PM
Its tremendous
Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 19, 2015 12:06 AM
www.bharatemployment.com
Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:33 AM

It just doesn't get much cooler than this!

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Detroit by Air

Detroit by Air | Navigate | Scoop.it
The stark contrast between the haves and have-nots is apparent from above, so too is the city’s rebound.

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 7, 2014 9:18 PM

In the 1950s, Detroit was the 4th largest city in the U.S. with a booming population around 2 million as seen in some vintage footage of Detroit.  As the de-industrialization process restructured the US economy, globalization restructured the world’s economy, and Detroit’s local economic strategy crumbledDetroit was $18-20 million in debt with a population around 700,000 and is unable to pull out of this nosedive. The tax base shrunk, city services were spread thin and in 2013, Detroit filed for bankruptcy.  Today, some parts of Detroit are rebounding well while others are in absolute disarray.  These differences can, in part, be understood by using aerial photography and a spatial perspective.  


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit

Dennis Swender's curator insight, December 10, 2014 4:23 PM

A multicultural research project:  by foot, by car, or by plane

Select your site:  Detroit?  Kansas City? Feguson? New York?

Take some pictures.  Start observing.  Interview some people.  Assemble some facts.   Justify your opinions. 

 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:16 PM

Deindustrialization and globalization are some of the reason why Detroit fluctuates configurations in the geography of manufacturing. The reduction of production in the car industry and all activities along with it is harmful to Detroit’s citizens, leaving a lot of workers without jobs. Globalization was adopted and American companies became attracted to the very low wages of workers in other countries that produce similar quality products as the US. Unfortunately, since globalization became the preferred option for the US, deindustrialization in Detroit rapidly increased. On the other hand, with the continuing advancements in technology, it turns out to be manageable with a few employees. Wealthy Detroiters sprawl out in the suburbs out of the city.  Due to the elimination of manufacturing jobs and relocation of residents out of the state, Detroit city remains with a population of 700,000 people. The effect of deindustrialization has been devastating, not only for workers, but also for the city itself. The regions with the lowest population rate will find it hard to survive with the increase of infrastructure and less income in taxes.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from The brain and illusions
Scoop.it!

These Amazing Art Illusions Prove Paper Can Be Anything But Basic

These Amazing Art Illusions Prove Paper Can Be Anything But Basic | Navigate | Scoop.it
Think paper is basic? Think again.

Yulia Brodskaya manages to turn paper into fantastical, illusionary artworks that come to life. A graphic designer and illustrator who has worked with companies from Neiman Marcus and Hermes to Starbucks and Ben...

Via Gerald Carey
more...
Gerald Carey's curator insight, September 13, 2014 4:04 AM

Using paper to make some spectacular figures and images.

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

2.6m historic pictures posted online

2.6m historic pictures posted online | Navigate | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
Jennifer Foster Harper's curator insight, August 31, 2014 3:54 PM

Great resource for Primary Sources.

 

Rescooped by Suvi Salo from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | Navigate | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."

 


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
Brady Jones's comment, February 9, 6:55 PM
Measurements from the Landsat satellite also make it possible to tell how much water the crops consume in an arid environment. Such measurements are likely to become more important as demands on limited water resources increase. Currently, agriculture accounts for 85 percent of the world’s fresh water consumption
Dennis Swender's curator insight, February 10, 12:39 AM
Share your insight
Brieanna Hepburn's comment, February 13, 6:15 PM
With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food.
Rescooped by Suvi Salo from college and career ready
Scoop.it!

Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) - Animals - Plants - Pictures & Information

Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) - Animals - Plants - Pictures & Information | Navigate | Scoop.it
The Encyclopedia of Life is an unprecedented effort to gather scientific knowledge about all animal and plant life where pictures, information, facts, and mo...

Via John Dalziel, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
John Dalziel's curator insight, April 1, 2014 4:16 PM

What is EOL? - Information and pictures of all species known to science, it is an Encyclopedia of Life.
Knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere.
EOL's dream is to gather it all together and make it available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice.