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Hubble goes to the eXtreme to assemble the deepest ever view of the Universe

Hubble goes to the eXtreme to assemble the deepest ever view of the Universe | Nauka | Scoop.it

Like photographers assembling a portfolio of their best shots, astronomers have assembled a new, improved portrait of our deepest-ever view of the Universe. Called the eXtreme Deep Field, or XDF, the photo was assembled by combining ten years of NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observations taken of a patch of sky within the original Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The XDF is a small fraction of the angular diameter of the full Moon.

 

The Hubble Ultra Deep Field is an image of a small area of space in the constellation of Fornax (The Furnace), created using Hubble Space Telescope data from 2003 and 2004. By collecting faint light over one million seconds of observation, the resulting image revealed thousands of galaxies, both nearby and very distant, making it the deepest image of the Universe ever taken at that time.

 

The new full-colour XDF image is even more sensitive than the original Hubble Ultra Deep Field image, thanks to the additional observations, and contains about 5500 galaxies, even within its smaller field of view. The faintest galaxies are one ten-billionth the brightness that the unaided human eye can see.

 
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Nauka | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.

 
Via Seth Dixon
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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Earth's City Lights

Earth's City Lights | Nauka | Scoop.it
NASA's Visible Earth catalog of NASA images and animations of our home planet...

 

This classic image is full of classroom applications.  The first impulse of most students is to note that this image will show us where people live, where the cities are or some other comment that speaks to the magnitude of the population in the white areas.  Let them analyze this for more time, and they'll notice that population isn't the whole story of this image.  A place like India shines, but less brightly than the eastern part of the United States.  I like to point out that South Korea appears to be an island (because North Korea is literally blacked out).  Politics, development, affluence and population information are all embedded in this image.  As with all maps, the more information you have about the place in question (in this case, Earth), the more meaningful information you can extract out of the map. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.

 
Via Seth Dixon
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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 18, 2012 12:35 PM
This image is pretty amazing to see. It shows what parts of the world are more modernized just by the lights seen from space. Looking at the U.S. and Europe, they are lit up very bright because they are richer parts of the world. As you look at places like Africa and some parts of South America, they are shown in darkness due to poorer areas in those regions.
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:07 PM
I was impressed with the explanation of this picture especially for the simple fact that I thought it was a picture that depicted the population of certain areas of each country. Places like Africa, Brazil, areas of Mexico, and Southern US are not lit because of the areas of forest, desert and less population. Very nice picture. -Michelle Carvajal-
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Most Magnetic Massive Star Found

Most Magnetic Massive Star Found | Nauka | Scoop.it

An international team of astronomers has reported the discovery of the strongest magnetic field ever found around a massive star. NGC 1624-2, also known as 2MASS J04403728+5027410, is an O-type star with a mass of 30 times that of the Sun. The star lies in the open star cluster NGC 1624 some 20,000 light-years away in the constellation Perseus. The star’s magnetic field is 20,000 times stronger than the Sun’s, and almost 10 times stronger than that detected around any other high-mass star. Additionally, despite their short lives – NGC 1624-2 will live only about five million years – massive stars shape the galaxies in which they live. “Their strong winds, intense radiation fields, and dramatic supernova explosions make them the primary sculptors of the structure, chemistry, and evolution of galaxies.


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Interactive Graphic: Drake equation - How many alien civilizations exist in our galaxy alone?

Interactive Graphic: Drake equation - How many alien civilizations exist in our galaxy alone? | Nauka | Scoop.it
Play with our interactive graphic to work out how many intelligent civilizations there could be in our universe.

 

Today, we live in an age of exploration, where robots on Mars and planet-hunting telescopes are beginning to allow us to edge closer to an answer.

 

While we wait to establish contact, one technique we can use back on Earth is an equation that American astronomer Frank Drake formulated in the 1960s to calculate the number of detectable extraterrestrial civilizations may exist in the Milky Way galaxy.

 

It is not a rigorous equation, offering a wide range of possible answers. Instead it is more a tool used to help understand how many worlds might be out there and how those estimates change as missions like Kepler, a telescope that is currently searching for Earth-like planets, begin to discover more about our universe.

 

Until ground-based observations, space telescopes and planet-roving robots uncover any tell-tale signs of life, what better way to speculate on how many intelligent alien civilizations may exist than to explore the universe with our interactive version of the equation.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Complete: 133 Leonard Susskind VIDEO Lectures (Stanford) on Modern Physics and Cosmology - 210 hours!

Lecture 1 of Leonard Susskind's Modern Physics course concentrating on Classical Mechanics. Recorded October 15, 2007 at Stanford University. This Stanford C...

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Jest nowy rekord ciepła na Ziemi: 5,5 bilionów stopni Celsjusza! - Gazeta Wyborcza

Jest nowy rekord ciepła na Ziemi: 5,5 bilionów stopni Celsjusza! - Gazeta Wyborcza | Nauka | Scoop.it
Jest nowy rekord ciepła na Ziemi: 5,5 bilionów stopni Celsjusza!Gazeta WyborczaAle LHC służy także do badania tzw. plazmy kwarkowo-gluonowej - stanu materii, który istniał w ułamek sekundy po Wielkim Wybuchu.
 
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Six Potential Habitable Exoplanets Now (September 2012)

Six Potential Habitable Exoplanets Now (September 2012) | Nauka | Scoop.it

Currently there are six potential habitable exoplanets -- four of these objects have been detected in the last year, from September 2011 to September 2012. Gliese 163c is a rock-water world of 2.4 Earth radii, however, it could be as small as 1.8 Earth radii if composed mostly of rock, like Earth.

 

New data suggests the confirmation of the exoplanet Gliese 581g and the best candidate so far of a potential habitable exoplanet. The nearby star Gliese 581 is well known for having four planets with the outermost planet, Gliese 581d, already suspected habitable. This will be the first time evidence for any two potential habitable exoplanets orbiting the same star. Gliese 581g will be included, together with Gliese 667Cc, Kepler-22b, HD85512, and Gliese 581d, in the Habitable Exoplanets Catalog of the PHL @ UPR Arecibo as the best five objects of interest for Earth-like exoplanets.

 
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Social Media is So Much More Than Likes and Followers

Social Media is So Much More Than Likes and Followers | Nauka | Scoop.it

"Much like SEO, where people tried (and still try) to manipulate the rankings, some people are trying to manipulate social media. Instead of putting in the time and effort to think about their customers and create a social media profile that will naturally attract and engage customers, they are looking for a quick and easy way to build a social media presence. These fast and furious social media marketing tactics usually amount to nothing.

 

 

 

There’s no doubt that social media signals (i.e. activity on social media) has some bearing on search rankings, but there is still a lot of debate about the specifics. It does appear that a business’ activity on Google+ may soon become a factor in search rankings".

 

 

 

Full Article Here: http://www.searchenginejournal.com/social-media-is-so-much-more-than-likes-and-followers/48149/

 
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Climate change determined humanity's global conquest in the past

Climate change determined humanity's global conquest in the past | Nauka | Scoop.it

Humans may have conquered the world, but not without a big helping hand from climate change. A major study of the last 120,000 years of history reminds us that, while we are adaptable, our species is ultimately at the mercy of the climate. Homo sapiens evolved in Africa around 200,000 years ago, but only left the continent about 70,000 years ago. After that our species rapidly went global, colonising first Europe and Asia, and then Australasia and the Americas.

 

But why did early humans linger so long in Africa, and what spurred them to finally move? Several theories have been proposed, but according to a large effort to reconstruct the last 120,000 years of human history – including the climate we lived in and the vegetation we fed on – the current population spread around the planet would not be as it is without key changes in the climate.

 

The new climate model revealed that climate changes probably had a key role in lifting four major roadblocks to humanity's global takeover. The first and most important roadblock was the Arabian peninsula, an impassable desert that trapped humans in Africa for tens of thousands of years. Then, 70,000 years ago it began receiving more rain. The coastal areas became more fertile, allowing humans out of Africa. One group expanded east into Asia, spreading south-east into Indonesia. There, they hit a second roadblock: high sea levels meant that wide stretches of open water separated the many islands. Manica assumed that crossings of 100 kilometres were a bridge too far, leaving pioneers no way to reach Australia. That meant people could only go further once sea levels fell, exposing more patches of low-lying land and making for shorter sea journeys. The waters fell 60,000 years ago and then again 15,000 years later, as successive glaciations trapped more of the world's water at the poles.

 

Further north, humans reached Siberia by 30,000 years ago, where they were met by a vast ice sheet which prevented them from entering North America – the third roadblock. Not until 15,000 years ago did it shrink, allowing them into the Americas. Once in, they spread rapidly. Back in Europe and Asia, populations faced one last roadblock: their local ice sheets. During warm periods humans went north into Scandinavia and northern Asia, but they were forced south when the ice advanced again.

 
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NASA animation of temperature data from 1880-2011

Tags: video, environment,  visualization, climatechange, environment modify. 


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Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters

Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters | Nauka | Scoop.it
Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

 

The 21st century is the dawn of a new era in human history: more people on Earth live in cities than in the countryside.  The impacts of this new basic fact are far-reaching.  One of those is that cities that are in particular environments are more prone to certain natural disasters and will be increasingly vulnerable as their populations increase (especially megacities in the developing world).


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Neil Turok: Physics in one formula - what caused the Big Bang?

Formula: http://www.genautica.com/formula.jpg

 

Schrödinger - Ψ; Planck - ℏ

Einstein and Newton - R16πG

Maxwell-Yang-Mills - F2

Dirac - ψ¯¯iDψ

Yukawa - λφψ¯¯ψ

Higgs -|Dφ|2

 

In words: (capital) Psi equals the integral of e raised to the quantity of i over h-bar multiplied by the integral of R over 16 pi G minus F squared plus psi bar i D psi minus lambda phi psi bar psi plus the absolute value of D psi squared minus V phi.


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