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Why businesses should pay to protect eco-systems

Why businesses should pay to protect eco-systems | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it
There's no contradiction between believing in the intrinsic value of nature and valuing the services it provides, writes Mark Reed

 

Defra has launched a best practice guide and action plan to help businesses and conservationists work together to deliver environmental benefits.

 

The idea is that business pays land managers for the value of the services they can provide from nature (eg carbon, clean water and biodiversity), above and beyond what normal markets would pay, so that these services can be maintained and enhanced. Businesses can then communicate the benefits of this work to their stakeholders, adding value to brands, and in some cases directly increasing profitability, for example by reducing water treatment costs for water utilities.

MJP EcoArchives's insight:

It's not a new idea - companies paying to conserve ecosystem services, and finding economic returns by doing so.

 

But we still never get sick of hearing about it!

 

An elegant responce to the idea that it is morally wrong to put a price-tag on nature (it's not by the way): "But in the same way that we are prepared to put a figure on the economic value of a healthy workforce without putting a value on a human life, I see no contradiction between believing in the intrinsic value of nature and valuing the services it provides."

 

We allow people and companies to reap economic benefit from destroying nature - think mining, or putting a new road through a mashland or forest - so why do we have such a problem when money is made from conserving it?

 

This UK story talks about their valuable peatlands, and finding a way to quantify the restoraiton work that impacting companies are doing. It's not offsetting, but it's still great work to be able to meaningfully measure impact and inputs to peatland conservation.

 

As the author says, getting people to recognise impacts and conservation in this way is an important step to other stages.

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Ecosystem Marketplace - Disney To Expand Voluntary Carbon Offset Buying

Ecosystem Marketplace - Disney To Expand Voluntary Carbon Offset Buying | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

Already a major player in the voluntary carbon market, the Walt Disney Company is planning to expand its offset purchasing program to cover indirect emissions related to its operations. Disney has pledged to continue supporting new offset projects, particularly in the forestry sector, and has used the funds generated from its double-digit internal carbon prices to pay above-average prices for the credits.

MJP EcoArchives's insight:

I like that Disney is being part of the push towards offsets. First, they are looking at offsets, not just accounting. 

 

Also, they're in an industry that doesn't have a high hit-rate when it comes to Ecosystem Services. I'm not saying they don't care - they just don't likey have the same drive for engagement it seems. Anyway, Disney is showing that it doesn't have to be like this. And it's a nice to see it creeping into and industry that might have a wider society reach.

 

The picture here comes from Disneys connection to the Alto Myo Forest in Peru with Conservation International, which you can read more about here:

http://www.ecosystemmarketplace.com/pages/dynamic/article.page.php?page_id=9809&section=home

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Private sector revitalizes eco systems management in Africa

Private sector revitalizes eco systems management in Africa | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

NAIROBI, (Xinhua) -- Multinational companies met here on Wednesday to discuss the role of the private sector in strengthening the fight against climate change and habitats depletion in sub-Saharan Africa.

“The business sector has a responsibility to advance environmental sustainability. We are promoting sustainable practices with the knowledge that healthy ecosystems underpin sustainable business practices,” the head of Corporate Agriculture, Nestle, Hans Joehr said.

MJP EcoArchives's insight:

Taking Corporate Ecosystem Service ideas to areas struggling the most with conservation is perhaps one of the greatest achievements our sector can make - such as in developing countries such as in Africa.

 

Corporate Ecosystem Services in areas where Human Services are sometimes stretched is a hard argument and a fine line. And their focus on Ecosystem Services for food security is the perfect illustration.

 

Great to see Business and Biodiversity in attendance, saying:

 

"The head of Business and Biodiversity Program at the University of Pretoria, South Africa, Anesu Makina, emphasized that business practices should not compromise the health of ecosystems.

“Private sector can contribute to food, water and energy security. They should adopt ecologically sound practices to deter risks that might dent their reputation and erode revenue streams,” Makina told delegates at the Africa Food Security Conference."

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Ecosystem service mapping and modelling -- new special issue shows big steps forward | Science Codex

Ecosystem service mapping and modelling -- new special issue shows big steps forward | Science Codex | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

This Special Issue "Mapping and Modelling Ecosystem Services" of the journal Ecosystem Services is mainly an outcome of the "Quantifying, Mapping, Modelling and Indicators of Ecosystem Services" Workshop that was organized at the 4th Ecosystem Services Partnership(ESP) Conference entitled Ecosystem Services: Integrating Science and Policy in October 2011 in Wageningen, the Netherlands.

The 14 articles in this Special Issue present the latest methods in modelling and mapping ecosystem services and their application to science, policy and practical decision making. The integration of geo-biophysical processes and structure assessments provides insights into actual ecosystem service supply and the ecological and biodiversity base (ecosystem functions). Information and data potential on ecosystem service beneficiaries (demand), their actual rates of use and consumption and how these components are interconnected (flows and trade-offs) can be analysed, integrated and represented by available tools such as thematic mapping, GIS, remote sensing, multi-criteria analysis, and dynamic geobiophysical and decision process models.

MJP EcoArchives's insight:

You have to pay for it, but Elsevier has produced a Special Issue on Mapping and Modelling Ecosystem Services: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/22120416/4

 

It talks all about how mapping and modeling can be used to look better at ecosystem services. Any Corporation wanting to manage or just understand the ecosystem services relelvant to their business start out by trying to visalise - or map - said services.

 

And the better we get at mapping and modeling, the more effective we'll be at manageing them in the Corporate sphere.

 

The report is science- heavy, but has some interesting titles....

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Ecosystem Services and Tropical Forest Restoration Course - Ecosystem Marketplace

Ecosystem Services and Tropical Forest Restoration Course - Ecosystem Marketplace | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

Ecosystem Services and Tropical Forest Restoration Course Ecosystem Marketplace Understanding the fundamentals underlying forest ecology and the use of tropical forests has become indispensable to manage the provision of environmental services in a sustainable manner in highly fragmented landscapes...

 

This field-based course will take place at STRI’s Agua Salud Project research site, located in the Panama Canal Watershed. Research at Agua Salud seeks to understand and quantify the ecological, social and economic services provided by tropical forests in the Panama Canal Watershed undergoing different types of land use and the effects of climate change. Such ecosystem services play a central role in the operation of the Panama Canal and subsequently world commerce. Over a period of five days, the course aims to provide the technical basis necessary to design and implement restoration strategies to increase the provision of ecosystem services in different land uses.

MJP EcoArchives's insight:

 

Wish I was there.... this course is sponsored by the  Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, in the City of Colón, Panama in the Panama Canal Watershed.

 

Not a traditional course in Ecology, or Natural Resource Management. I'm sure there are many out there who want access this is kind of further education.

 

See environment.yale.edu for more.

 

"The course has been designed to convey advances in ecology and restoration of ecosystem services for professionals and technicians working in government institutions, NGOs and the private sector, through a series of presentations, discussion sessions and field based exercises. Foresters, agronomists, veterinarians as well as contractors, consultants and other working groups involved in land management projects, reforestation and natural resource management in Panama and other countries in Latin America are encouraged to apply"

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Why businesses should pay to protect eco-systems

Why businesses should pay to protect eco-systems | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it
There's no contradiction between believing in the intrinsic value of nature and valuing the services it provides, writes Mark Reed

 

Defra has launched a best practice guide and action plan to help businesses and conservationists work together to deliver environmental benefits.

 

The idea is that business pays land managers for the value of the services they can provide from nature (eg carbon, clean water and biodiversity), above and beyond what normal markets would pay, so that these services can be maintained and enhanced. Businesses can then communicate the benefits of this work to their stakeholders, adding value to brands, and in some cases directly increasing profitability, for example by reducing water treatment costs for water utilities.

MJP EcoArchives's insight:

It's not a new idea - companies paying to conserve ecosystem services, and finding economic returns by doing so.

 

But we still never get sick of hearing about it!

 

An elegant responce to the idea that it is morally wrong to put a price-tag on nature (it's not by the way): "But in the same way that we are prepared to put a figure on the economic value of a healthy workforce without putting a value on a human life, I see no contradiction between believing in the intrinsic value of nature and valuing the services it provides."

 

We allow people and companies to reap economic benefit from destroying nature - think mining, or putting a new road through a mashland or forest - so why do we have such a problem when money is made from conserving it?

 

This UK story talks about their valuable peatlands, and finding a way to quantify the restoraiton work that impacting companies are doing. It's not offsetting, but it's still great work to be able to meaningfully measure impact and inputs to peatland conservation.

 

As the author says, getting people to recognise impacts and conservation in this way is an important step to other stages.

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Demystifying the Role of Ecosystem Services in Impact Assessments on Environmental Expert

Demystifying the Role of Ecosystem Services in Impact Assessments on Environmental Expert | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

"Ensuring that development projects benefit both people and the planet is becoming more and more of a priority.

 

Environmental and social impact assessments (ESIA) have been in use for decades to consider the effects of projects such as dams, highways, and oil and gas development. Over the years, ESIAs have evolved to cover both environmental and social impacts, including health and human rights...

 

In 2012, important financial institutions–the International Finance Corporation and the Equator Principles Financial Institutions–took a welcome step towards promoting a more holistic approach to impact assessment, requiring their clients to address ecosystem services as part of their due diligence."

MJP EcoArchives's insight:

Ecosystem services are a more tangible, concrete way of looking at the impacts on the environment, hence the emerging popularity of the term.

 

To me, looking at impacts via Ecosystem Services means not just looking at the impacts on the ecosystem, and impacts on humans, but looking at the things from that ecosystem that humans use and how this is effected.

 

This might seem a small detail but think about this example:

 

"Take the tundra example. Before implementing a project, environmental practitioners might look at its impact on the total reindeer population and find it to be relatively low. Addressing ecosystem services, however, focuses the assessment on reindeer populations in specific hunting grounds and how changes would affect hunters and their families."

 

Is it right to weight the impacts of environmental damage by how much humans use that part of the enviroment. What would happen if the impact to reindeer was huge for the reindeer population, but not in areas that they are hunted by humans? Does this make the impact less important because the impact on the Reindeer as an Ecosystem Service is less?

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MJP EcoArchives's curator insight, June 8, 2013 9:05 PM

Ecosystem services are a more tangible, concrete way of looking at the impacts on the environment, hence the emerging popularity of the term.

 

To me, looking at impacts via Ecosystem Services means not just looking at the impacts on the ecosystem, and impacts on humans, but looking at the things from that ecosystem that humans use and how this is effected.

 

This might seem a small detail but think about this example:

 

"Take the tundra example. Before implementing a project, environmental practitioners might look at its impact on the total reindeer population and find it to be relatively low. Addressing ecosystem services, however, focuses the assessment on reindeer populations in specific hunting grounds and how changes would affect hunters and their families."

 

Is it right to weight the impacts of environmental damage by how much humans use that part of the enviroment. What would happen if the impact to reindeer was huge for the reindeer population, but not in areas that they are hunted by humans? Does this make the impact less important because the impact on the Reindeer as an Ecosystem Service is less?

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Press Release: Coca-Cola Enterprises' sustainability report reveals lowest ever water usage ratio and 15 percent reduction in operational carbon footprint | Ethical Corporation

Press Release: Coca-Cola Enterprises' sustainability report reveals lowest ever water usage ratio and 15 percent reduction in operational carbon footprint | Ethical Corporation | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

"LONDON, May 30, 2013 - Coca-Cola Enterprises ... today published its 2012/2013 Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability (CRS) report, demonstrating significant achievements in carbon reduction, water usage and packaging recycling. The company also introduced a new digital reporting model to engage a wider range of audiences in its sustainability journey.

 

The new report details a number of key achievements towards the company’s sustainability plan, including:

5% reduction in CCE’s operational carbon footprint Lowest ever water usage ratio of 1.4 liters (the amount of water used to make one liter of product) 15 million bottles collected at the London 2012 Olympic Games reprocessed and returned to shelves within six weeks $3.9m invested across CCE’s communities, including active and healthy living programs Portfolio of low and no-calorie drinks expanded through introduction of products with stevia, a naturally-sourced, zero-calorie sweetener 100% of new coolers purchased HFC-free from January 2013"
MJP EcoArchives's insight:

These seem like real, tangible numbers here. It seems too often the intention is good but the outcomes are tiny. Maybe we've reached critical mass and are on the up-swing to real results. Thank you Coca-Cola. It's not saving the world, but it's good news for my Friday :)

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Dow Jones Sustainability Index methodology - SAM's Corporate Sustainability Assessment questionnaire info report

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MJP EcoArchives's curator insight, January 17, 2013 12:43 PM

Does not specifically mention ecosystem services in the Environment area... but then again, doesn't mention ANYTHING specifically. How does one get a hold of the actual questionnaire (as it's specific to each industry). Could not find this publically available.

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In New Orleans, Entergy Prepares for the Next Big One

In New Orleans, Entergy Prepares for the Next Big One | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it
The Louisiana power utility has a strategy for the changing climate
MJP EcoArchives's insight:

Investing in wetlands (and other mitigation efforts) to avoid effects of climate change. 

 

"In September [of 2012], the power utility Entergy (ETR)... announced that it had developed a new framework to compensate landowners for preserving swamps...


At first glance, Entergy’s interest in wetlands could be dismissed as a public-relations exercise—the kind that falls under the rubric of corporate sustainability. Yet it ties into one of the more aggressive climate risk management plans in the country."

 

"...the encroaching water drives home why the company is investing not only in infrastructure but in wetlands. “We can’t just decide to pick up and go somewhere else. We’re here,” says Steve Tullos, Entergy’s manager of environmental initiatives. “So we need to make here as good a place as it can be.”

 

...A study commissioned by Entergy identifies $120 billion in investments that would curtail economic losses from climate change."

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UNEP report "Biodiversity Offsets: Voluntary and Compliance Regimes"

UNEP report "Biodiversity Offsets: Voluntary and Compliance Regimes" | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

New UNEP report on biodiversity offsets. Summary of what it is, law/policy drivers in different countries, etc.

 


Via Carlos Ferreira
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Molnar and Kubiszewski 2012, Ecosystem Services [journal]

Molnar and Kubiszewski 2012, Ecosystem Services [journal] | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

The other (2 of 2) journal articles that specifically reference corporate ecosystem services (section on it). In new Ecosystem Services journal.

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Work in Progress: Ecosystem Service Tools Overview

Work in Progress: Ecosystem Service Tools Overview | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it
Thought I’d share an overview I’ve been working on to simplify the expanding suite of tools available to identify, measure, value and track ecosystem services. This overview is written ...
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Natural Value Initiative Publications

Natural Value Initiative Publications | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

NVI is the biodiversity benchmarking project. So they have various publications that benchmark companies within different sectors. 

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Disruptive Conservation: A Path to Landscape Resiliency

Disruptive Conservation: A Path to Landscape Resiliency | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

By Tim Gieseke, Founder and President, Ag Resource Strategies, LLC, USA ...

This divergence is described as disruptive conservation, a term borrowed from The Innovator’s Dilemma, where disruptive innovationis described as a market force that occurs due to the introduction of a new process, technology, and/or product that appeals to a new customer base enabling them to approach an issue with a different set of values and strategies.

In the Sunrise case, the new product is the farm portfolio and the new customer is the state of Minnesota. This illustrates the potential of disruptive conservation; where the farmers were once the [conservation practice] customer of the USDA CDS, now the government, NGOs and corporations can become the farmers’ [environmental asset] customers.

In disruptive innovation, a realignment of activities and relationships among the stakeholders occurs causing some corporations to flourish and others to fail. But due to the comprehensive nature of landscape management, the CDS stakeholders remain viable components.

In the Sunrise project, local agronomists assess farms and develop portfolios. This realignment decouples the on-farm assessment process from government programs, causing the CDS to shift from a program-driven to a more resource-driven process; a recommendation of National Association of State Conservation Agencies in a 2007 report Evaluation of the Nation’s Conservation Delivery System."

MJP EcoArchives's insight:

Those interested about in Ecosystem Services may well be intersted in this new take on how to assess and manage the Ecosystem Services for on-farm conservation. 

 

"This is a key divergence from the traditional USDA CDS, which valued the costs and processes of implementing conservation practices rather than the quality of outcomes. The traditional approach was sufficient when farmers only wanted to address on-farm resource issues, but it is not sufficient today as government, NGOs and corporations are more interested in off-farm environmental impacts."

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Partnerships between NGOs and companies can protect ecosystems

Partnerships between NGOs and companies can protect ecosystems | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it
In joining forces to protect nature there must be a mutuality of interest and an ability to speak each other's language, says Meindert Brouwer

 

"Companies' share in the responsibility for the destruction and degradation of nature on our planet is considerable. At the same time, these firms – especially those that produce commodities – depend on nature to stay in business. Most of them do not know how to reduce their negative impact on nature, nor do they know how to benefit from nature in a sustainable way. NGOs can help them out...."

MJP EcoArchives's insight:

Not offering ground-breaking insight into NGO and Corporate partnerships, but a nicer reminder, refresher or introduction to the partnerships out there and the 'easy' options for corporations wanting to do more with Ecosystem Services. Particularly for any companies who have a less-than-positive view of COnservation NGO's.

 

See the nice example at the bottom with WWF in the Netherlands.

 

I think there could be a really strong partnership with NGO's and there's probably more that could be done here. Is there really need for the animosity sometimes seen - why can't all NGO/Corporate partnership be like this?

 

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Are payments for environment services a glass half full or half empty?

Are payments for environment services a glass half full or half empty? | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it
Payments for environmental services can both save the environment and alleviate poverty: True, false or none of the above?
MJP EcoArchives's insight:

Much of the time, Corporations' interactions with Ecosystem Services, is through paying for them. We talk about PES when we talk about Payment for Ecosystem (environmental) Services, and most of the time, these are Payments to conserve the Environment and keep the Services coming. 

And many of you will be familiar with the long list of reasons why this offers environmental conservation many benefits in our current economic, environmental and social space.

So you'll also be aware that in the number of years these terms have been used by conservationists, land managers and resource planers there have been far fewer positive examples than original optimism promised. That's not to say that the idea has not been successful, it just hasn't revolutionarily  halted environmental degradation all over the planet. Why not? It would be good to know where we're going wrong, with such a sensible idea.

Researchers of this most recent paper suggest:

“PES sounds simple because it’s one party compensating another for doing something they both agree on,” Wunder said. “But if multiple stakeholders are involved claiming different rights that are maybe not well-defined in terms of land use and land-use change, then suddenly it becomes complicated. Or maybe buyers are not sufficiently organized to reach an agreement to pay as a collective unit. Then, although there’s a good case for PES, it’s not going to work.”

Citing his own earlier work, Wunder defined the principle of PES as, “a voluntary, conditional transaction between at least one buyer and one seller of a well-defined service.”

“This is too narrow,” Muradian said. “What’s the point of a definition that can only describe a limited number of schemes? We need a different analytical framework to understand them.”

Far from being some sort of PES little-black-cloud, this research suggests that PES discussion are a promising way to discuss and negotiate environmental compensation and achieve more equitable outcomes. But they want to take applied research further and find out how to design PES systems that really work. Skeptics are invited, they day. I think this has the potential to produce some really interesting, and potential valuable research.

 

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Eco4Biz: Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity Tools To Support Business Decision-Making | Sustainable Brands

Eco4Biz: Ecosystem Services and Biodiversity Tools To Support Business Decision-Making | Sustainable Brands | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it
Eco4Biz provides a structured overview of existing tools and approaches that are publicly available.
MJP EcoArchives's insight:

This seems like a newer approach to assessing ecosystem services for corporations - assistance to choose the right tool. That's just so important because

1. the huge amout of tools out there can be overwhelming, and I suspect offputting, to some organsisations

2. choosing the right tool increases the likelyhood that the Ecosystem Assessment process will lead to real, tangible outcomes.

 

I like their aims - to make it easy for companies to start thinking about broadening the way they assess their foot prints, towards Ecosystem Services and Biodiveristy for example.

 

I also like the way they'd like tool developers to be able to see what's out there already. They talk about wanting a 'common tool-kit'

 

This seems like a positive addition to the Coporate Tools space.

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The future of hydropower in Sarawak

The future of hydropower in Sarawak | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it
With its appetite for energy spurred by heavy industries via the Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy (SCORE), Sarawak is in the market to search for more energy sources.

As options are sought to fulfill these needs, power generation through hydropower has been identified as the catalyst to drive and accelerate socio-economic growth in the state."

Indeed, Sarawak is deemed the ‘perfect candidate’ for hydropower solutions, given its high volume of rainfall and elevated topography. Such was the notion brought forward at the recent International Hydropower Association (IHA) Conference held at the Borneo Convention Centre Kuching." 

MJP EcoArchives's insight:

This Conference talked about the sustainability issues surrounding Hydro-power, including the need for biodiversity offsets, and considering the impacts on local communities from loss of forest cover - all ecosystem services that are traded off against the benefits of hydro-power.

 

They say that there is a push world-wide towards more sustainable approaches to power generation, and this includes better consideration of Ecosystem Services.

 

So it's great to see the need to consider Ecosystem Services is discussed here, but it also acknowledged that Sarawak has a long way to go in this regard.

 

This is a great article on the global hydro-power industry in general - and alternative energy systems such as these are going to be more and more topical as other energy sources - more polluting and environmentally damaging - are less and less popular.

 

But Hydro has it's own sustainability issues, and it's great to see this at the forefront of the conversation.

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Royal Dutch Shell plc Sustainability Report 2012

Royal Dutch Shell plc Sustainability Report 2012 | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

To indroduce their Sustainability Report 2012, Mr. Peter Voser, CEO: "I am pleased to introduce the Shell Sustainability Report for 2012. Against the backdrop of a still-struggling global economy, we continue to operate in economically, environmentally and socially responsible ways; and to invest for the future."

MJP EcoArchives's insight:

Is there any other industry that has such an impact across how Corporations interact with Ecosystem Services (human and non-human alike)? A clear bench-mark in the need to stay ahead of addressing impacts on an ecosystem level by the massive Energy Corporation of Royal Dutch Shell. It tells you much about Shell themselves, but is an interesting trend-baramoter for 2012.

 

I could make comments about another CSR report - there are a lot out there and as expected Shell's is polished and comprehensive.

 

But I like this graphic from their report, let's talk about this.

It's a nice way of looking at the company behind this report. It's massive.

 

Think about this when you're reading a sustainability report like this - this is the universe we are looking at.

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7 things you need to know about the EU Environmental Footprinting Initiative

7 things you need to know about the EU Environmental Footprinting Initiative | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it
The European Commission recently announced the publication of two guides on environmental footprinting for organisations and products. Dr. Michael …
MJP EcoArchives's insight:

I find some great information on 2Degrees - they really have their eye on the corporate world, but have a indentifyable 'green' attitude.

 

I like this because I like Footprinting - if done right (and I mean IF) it can have a great ecosystem services appraoch.

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Texas holds task force meetings to track endangered species listings developments

Keeping Texas First: Tracking the Economic Impact of Federal Action on Endangered Species, Air and Water
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MJP EcoArchives's curator insight, January 23, 2013 10:52 AM

See meetings, agendas, and minutes at this website. Very interesting.

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Business acting for biodiversity: CEMEX and BirdLife’s plans for biodiversity spring into action | BirdLife Community

Business acting for biodiversity: CEMEX and BirdLife’s plans for biodiversity spring into action | BirdLife Community | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

December 2011 marked the unveiling of this tool: the CEMEX-BirdLife Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) Guidance. A BAP is a document that provides a standard framework for identifying, protecting and enhancing biodiversity at a site, including stages for biodiversity surveys, people engagement and sustainable site management.


Via Gill Mortimer
MJP EcoArchives's insight:

one of the most common types of corporate action on ecosystem services is some kind of policy like a biodiversity action plan. Cemex is sharing theirs.

 

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Houdet et al 2012, Ecological Economics

Houdet et al 2012, Ecological Economics | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it

"Understanding changes in business strategies regarding biodiversity and ecosystem services"

 

1 of 2 journal articles found that actually focus on Corp + ecosystem services. 

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How businesses take into account BES risks

Very good report. Quick synthesis of state of corporate action on biodiversity (/ES), case studies. EU/international focus.

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Daily et al 2009, Ecosystem services in decision making: time to deliver

Daily et al 2009, Ecosystem services in decision making: time to deliver | Corporate Ecosystem Services | Scoop.it
Gretchen C Daily, Stephen Polasky, Joshua Goldstein, Peter M Kareiva, Harold A Mooney, Liba Pejchar, Taylor H Ricketts, James Salzman, and Robert Shallenberger. 2009. Ecosystem services in decision making: time to deliver.

 

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. I think the whole issue was on ES. 

 

"Here, we propose a conceptual framework and sketch out a strategic plan for delivering on the promise of ecosystem services... We describe key advances in the science and practice of accounting for natural capital in the decisions of individuals, communities, corporations, and governments."

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