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Rescooped by Amanda Partridge from Natural and Built Environments
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Browse Inside Houses and Homes by Ann Morris, Illustrated by Ken Heyman

Browse Inside Houses and Homes by Ann Morris, Illustrated by Ken Heyman | Nature | Scoop.it
Browse Inside Houses and Homes, by Ann Morris, Illustrated by Ken Heyman, a Paperback from HarperCollins, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers

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jkee1851's curator insight, April 23, 2013 1:12 AM

This book leads students through an exploration of different houses around the world which will link the built and natural environment topic to a global perspective. Here students can compare the images of different houses around the world to their own home.


A teaching idea involves looking at an enlarged image of each page and the class can narrate to the teacher differences in general to homes they find in their neighbourhood. Points may also come up of where students may have seen houses like these or features like these e.g. in picture books, on holidays. Discussion of why these features are important might occur with the more advanced students – especially with some of the images of houses that are on stilts above water.


A numeracy link could involve identifying different types of shapes in the different images of houses around the world (Mathematics Syllabus SGES1.2) – printouts of the pictures from the book or from a website such as http://www.hgpho.to/wfest/house/house-e.html could be drawn on with marker to show the different shapes or placed up on an IWB where the student can trace different shapes found. Then the shapes can be counted in each picture and a total of all the different types of shapes found and how many of each could be established.


For assessment students could write a sentence or two about how their home is similar and different to a house pictured. A starting prompt could include “My house is similar to the one in the picture because …” or “My house is different to the one in the picture because …”. These can then be stuck up under the relevant picture. Remembering that some students still learning to write may need to narrate to the teacher who can write under their writing legibly. This links in with the emphases of global education which indicates that in the early years students should see how they are connected to other people and places. Looking at different houses around the world and identifying what is similar and different enables students to connect on a global level with places around the world (Global Perspectives, A framework for global education in Australian Schools - http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/GPS_web.pdf, 2011).

Rescooped by Amanda Partridge from Natural and Built Environments
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Built and Natural Environments

A clip to help students understand the difference between built and natural environments. ES1 loved it!

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jkee1851's curator insight, April 23, 2013 1:13 AM

This resource is a great way to introduce students to the idea of natural and built features and provide a reference point for students to start identifying the natural and built features in their own immediate environments. The video contains some images of landmarks from around Sydney that students will recognise as well as images from around the world of all different types of natural and built and features.


During the video, the teacher can stop on chosen images and get students to discuss and suggest reasons why that feature can be classified as either built or natural environment.  The main teaching idea is to get student to identify what elements they are using to determine whether it is a natural or built feature. Then in pairs give students a number of images which together they will need to sort into built and natural by discussing the features they see in each image. The task can also be used as a goal indicator for students, stating that by the end of this topic you will be able to identify different natural and built features of the environment around you (Principle of Assessment For Learning).


To assess student understanding get students to complete the sentence “A natural environment I know is… “ and “A built environment I know is…” as well as drawing an image to represent these two chosen environment from their experiences. This aligns with the Literacy Continuum where Early Stage 1 students are expected to at cluster 3 or middle of the year, write a recognisable sentence.  For extra scaffolding the sentence can be completed on the board with the students that need the support and they can then go and copy this sentence. For students who need extension have them complete another sentence describing the natural and built environment. (Linking to cluster 4 on the Literacy Continuum.)

Luke Hayward's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:44 PM

This resource is a great way to introduce students to the idea of natural and built features and provide a reference point for students to start identifying the natural and built features in their own immediate environments. The video contains some images of landmarks from around Sydney that students will recognise as well as images from around the world of all different types of natural and built and features.

 

During the video, the teacher can stop on chosen images and get students to discuss and suggest reasons why that feature can be classified as either built or natural environment.  The main teaching idea is to get student to identify what elements they are using to determine whether it is a natural or built feature. Then in pairs give students a number of images which together they will need to sort into built and natural by discussing the features they see in each image. The task can also be used as a goal indicator for students, stating that by the end of this topic you will be able to identify different natural and built features of the environment around you (Principle of Assessment For Learning).

 

To assess student understanding get students to complete the sentence “A natural environment I know is… “ and “A built environment I know is…” as well as drawing an image to represent these two chosen environment from their experiences. This aligns with the Literacy Continuum where Early Stage 1 students are expected to at cluster 3 or middle of the year, write a recognisable sentence.  For extra scaffolding the sentence can be completed on the board with the students that need the support and they can then go and copy this sentence. For students who need extension have them complete another sentence describing the natural and built environment. (Linking to cluster 4 on the Literacy Continuum.)