Natural plant ext...
Follow
Find
42 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

Risk of dying from invasive breast cancer lower among multivitamin/mineral users

Risk of dying from invasive breast cancer lower among multivitamin/mineral users | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

 

Findings from a study involving thousands of postmenopausal women suggest that women who develop invasive breast cancer may benefit from taking supplements containing both multivitamins and minerals. The new research, published today in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, found that the risk of dying from invasive breast cancer was 30 percent lower among multivitamin/mineral users compared with nonusers.

 

"Our study offers tentative but intriguing evidence that multivitamin/mineral supplements may help older women who develop invasive breast cancer survive their disease," said Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Ph.D., lead author of the study and distinguished university professor emerita of epidemiology and population health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.

 

Multivitamin/mineral supplements are the most commonly consumed dietary supplements among U.S. adults. They usually contain 20-30 vitamins and minerals, often at levels of 100 percent of U.S. Recommended Dietary Allowances or less, and the usual label recommendation is to take them daily.


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

Magnesium, vitamin D status and mortality: results from US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001 to 2006 and NHANES III

Magnesium plays an essential role in the synthesis and metabolism of vitamin D and magnesium supplementation substantially reversed the resistance to vitamin D treatment in patients with magnesium-dependent vitamin-D-resistant rickets. We hypothesized that dietary magnesium alone, particularly its interaction with vitamin D intake, contributes to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels, and the associations between serum 25(OH)D and risk of mortality may be modified by magnesium intake level.

 

Methods

We tested these novel hypotheses utilizing data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001 to 2006, a population-based cross-sectional study, and the NHANES III cohort, a population-based cohort study. Serum 25(OH)D was used to define vitamin D status. Mortality outcomes in the NHANES III cohort were determined by using probabilistic linkage with the National Death Index (NDI).

 

Results

High intake of total, dietary or supplemental magnesium was independently associated with significantly reduced risks of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency respectively. Intake of magnesium significantly interacted with intake of vitamin D in relation to risk of both vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency. Additionally, the inverse association between total magnesium intake and vitamin D insufficiency primarily appeared among populations at high risk of vitamin D insufficiency. Furthermore, the associations of serum 25(OH)D with mortality, particularly due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colorectal cancer, were modified by magnesium intake, and the inverse associations were primarily present among those with magnesium intake above the median.

 

Conclusions

Our preliminary findings indicate it is possible that magnesium intake alone or its interaction with vitamin D intake may contribute to vitamin D status. The associations between serum 25(OH)D and risk of mortality may be modified by the intake level of magnesium. Future studies, including cohort studies and clinical trials, are necessary to confirm the findings.


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

What Causes Violent Behavior In Teens? Consider Deficiencies In Vitamins And Minerals

What Causes Violent Behavior In Teens? Consider Deficiencies In Vitamins And Minerals | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

 

In an effort to find the reasons for violent behavior among teens, many people point to video games, the media, or eroding families, yet one researcher believes the answer may be as simple as malnutrition.

 

“Above all the most influential factor in the course of increasing violence has been changes in the American food system and loss of nutrients for children and growing teens,” wrote Sylvia Onusic, Ph.D., in her article “Violent Behavior: A Solution in Plain Sight.”

 

In fact, deficiencies of vitamins and minerals may all contribute to anxiety, aggression, and violent behavior, according to Onusic, whose work was published earlier this year by The Weston A. Price Foundation, a nonprofit nutrition education foundation. Another factor that may be responsible for rising rates of violence? The increasing prevalence of psychiatric drug use among children and teens, says Onusic.

 


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

Natural cure for cataracts, glaucoma validated

Natural cure for cataracts, glaucoma validated | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

Can extracts of bitter kola (Garcinia kola), garden egg (Solanum melongena) and pepper fruit (Dennettia tripetala) provide the elusive natural cure for eye diseases especially cataracts and glaucoma? CHUKWUMA MUANYA writes.

 

UNTIL now, they are renowned for their bitter and peppery tastes. They have been validated in clinical trials for treating various ailments such as osteoarthritis, food poisoning, indigestion, and heartburn, among many other disease indications.

 

  But now researchers are adding more feathers to their caps. Extracts of bitter kola, garden egg and pepper fruit have shown promise as the next best eye drugs in town. 

 

  Garcinia kola of the family Guttiferaceae is an indigenous herb in Nigeria colloquially referred to as “bitter kola”, “false kola” or “male kola.” Garcinia kola has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, antimicrobial and antiviral properties. 

 

  Botanically called Dennettia tripetala, pepper fruit belongs to the plant family Annonaceae. It is called Ako in Edo, Nkarika in Ibibio, Mmimi in Igbo, and Ata igbere in Yoruba.

 

  Botanically called Solanum melongena, garden egg or bitter tomato is an economic flowering plant belonging to the family Solanaceae.


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from Ayurvedic Medicine
Scoop.it!

Ayurvedic Diet With Six Tastes : Ayurvedic Cooking Art Of Living

Ayurvedic Diet With Six Tastes : Ayurvedic Cooking Art Of Living | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it
Ayurvedic Cooking: The Art Of Living With Ayurveda Apart from remedial Ayurveda fix's sickness and safeguard health care.

Via Ayurvedic Medicine
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

What government tells you to eat is all wrong

What government tells you to eat is all wrong | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

 

I have a hobby. When I see a healthy patient over 90 years old, I always ask them about their diet, and the answer is almost always the same: They lean over and, sounding a little guilty like the kid who got caught with their hand in the cookie jar, say something like, “Well, I hate to tell you this, but I have eaten butter, eggs and bacon all my life.”

 

At which point I ask the female patients about their pie cooking – and they all agree they used lard.

 

 


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

Coenzyme Q10 And Cancer: Enhancing Treatment Outcomes And Improving Chemotherapy Tolerability

Coenzyme Q10 And Cancer: Enhancing Treatment Outcomes And Improving Chemotherapy Tolerability | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

 

Few lay people understand that one of the reasons chemotherapy does not cure more cancers is that its inherent toxicity limits the dosage that can be administered. What this means is that even if the cancer is slowly being eradicated by the chemo drugs, the damage inflicted on healthy cells can be so severe that chemotherapy must be discontinued. A common side effect cancer victims face is chemotherapy-induced immune suppression that leaves patients susceptible to life-threatening infections.

 

Fortunately, research suggests that coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) can offer critical support for those challenged with cancer, including improving the tolerability of chemotherapy and lessening its adverse impact on immune function. In addition, tantalizing evidence suggests that CoQ10 may help chemotherapy drugs more effectively battle cancer via several fascinating mechanisms. Here, we’ll explore CoQ10’s importance in combating cancer.


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

Ancient Ayurveda Beats Clonazepam in Clinical Trial for Anxiety Disorder

Ancient Ayurveda Beats Clonazepam in Clinical Trial for Anxiety Disorder | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

 

Researchers from India have proven in a randomized clinical study using international protocols that an ancient Ayurveda remedy for anxiety outperformed the benzodiazepine drug Clonazepam (Klonopin) in relieving severe anxiety.

 

The researchers, from India's National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), tested 72 patients in a hospital setting who were diagnosed with severe generalized anxiety disorder using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS). The test subjects were all adults between 20 and 55 years old of both sexes and most had experienced their anxiety disorder for seven years or more. They were also diagnosed with comorbid generalized social phobia.

 

The researchers randomly divided the patients into three groups. One group was given the standard anti-anxiety medication Clonazepam (Klonopin) at the standard prescriptive dose of .75 milligrams per day (.25mg morning, .50mg night). Another group received 200 milligrams of an Ayurvedic herbal remedy called Manasamitra Vataka (also Manasamitra Vatakam) – in two doses (100 mg each).


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
Pasquale Valente's curator insight, September 11, 2013 6:40 AM

"Manasamitra Vataka significantly reduced the
anxiety, severity of the disease, stabilized the mood, increased
the quality of life, and improved the clinical profile
of patients with GAD and comorbid generalized social
phobia."  http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdf/10.1089/acm.2010.0778

Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from Vitae Herbae (herbal, natural, integrative medicine & health)
Scoop.it!

Inhibition of neuroinflammation by cinnamon and its main components. [Food Chem. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Inhibition of neuroinflammation by cinnamon and its main components. [Food Chem. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

Abstract

Uncontrolled activation of microglia contributes to neuroinflammation, which is highly involved in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Although cinnamon has neuro-protective properties, its capacity to inhibit neuroinflammation has not been investigated and its active compounds remain unclear. Therefore, the composition of cinnamon extract was analysed by LC-MS and the ability of cinnamon and its main constituents to inhibit neuroinflammation was evaluated using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated BV2 microglia culture system. In total, 50 μg/mL cinnamon extract decreased significantly the production and expression of nitric oxide (NO), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in LPS-activated BV2 microglia. Blocking of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation was the most likely mechanism responsible for inhibition by cinnamon of neuroinflammation. Among the eight tested compounds, cinnamaldehyde had the greatest anti-neuroinflammatory capacity. Experimental results suggest that cinnamon may have a potential therapeutic effect against neurodegenerative diseases and its potent anti-neuroinflammatory capacity was primarily attributed to cinnamaldehyde.


Via Pasquale Valente
more...
Pasquale Valente's curator insight, September 6, 2013 4:01 AM

"Experimental results suggest that cinnamon may have a potential therapeutic effect against neurodegenerative diseases and its potent anti-neuroinflammatory capacity was primarily attributed to cinnamaldehyde."

Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from Alternative Health Trends
Scoop.it!

Turmeric Produces 'Remarkable' Recovery in Alzheimer's Patients

Turmeric Produces 'Remarkable' Recovery in Alzheimer's Patients | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it
Turmeric has been used in India for over 5,000 years, which is likely why still today both rural and urban populations have some of the lowest prevalence rates of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the world.

Via Ingrid Long
more...
Sandy Spencer's curator insight, October 9, 2013 4:25 PM

I read great health results about Turmeric a few years ago. I've been giving a "sprinkle" on most meat dishes ever since. I do it only once a day, though, as I've also read articles that warn of overdose. Apparently a dash of turmeric a day is all you need.  Be cautious!

yon heroz's curator insight, October 11, 2013 3:02 AM

TUMERIC -SO GOOD FOR LIVER HEALTH

Cynthia J. Coan's curator insight, November 21, 2013 8:55 AM

Can turmeric play a role in fighting Alzheimer's?

Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

Herbal Antiseptic Oils Beats Chemical for Inhibiting Superbug Infections

Herbal Antiseptic Oils Beats Chemical for Inhibiting Superbug Infections | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

 

As the battle against superbugs like MRSA and other hospital-acquired infections rages on, researchers have determined that oils derived from plants outperform the antiseptic chlorhexidine and even ethanol in the inhibition of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

 

The researchers - from Australia's Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital - tested a number of extracts derived from plants, including Tea Tree oil, Lemongrass oil, and Eucalyptus oil - against several of the most deadly antibiotic-resistant superbugs. These included Klebsiella pneumoniae, MRSA - methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus,  VRE - vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli. The testing was carried out in a laboratory.

The researchers also tested the same bacteria strains against the two most popular antiseptic products used to disinfect hands, hospital equipment and bedsides - chlorhexidine and ethanol, commonly termed rubbing alcohol. The concentration of these were standard issue – 0.1% chlorhexidine and 70% ethanol. The researchers also tested olive oil – as olive oil is also used in some settings to repel bacteria.

 

The researchers measured what is referred to as the zone of inhibition. This is the distance to which a substance will repel the bacteria - preventing microbiological activity. A larger zone of inhibition relates to a stronger antiseptic/antibiotic agent.


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
Pasquale Valente's curator insight, September 24, 2013 3:50 PM

"In particular, the research found that Lemongrass oil significantly inhibited gram-positive bacteria while Tea Tree significantly inhibited gram-negative bacteria."

Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

Turmeric Extract Kills Highly Lethal Pancreatic Tumors, Preclinical Study Reveals

Turmeric Extract Kills Highly Lethal Pancreatic Tumors, Preclinical Study Reveals | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

 

The new study was performed by researchers at the Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, and Institute for Cancer Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas. They determined the antitumor effects of a liposomal curcumin formulation against human pancreatic cancer cells through in vitro and xenograft studies, where the cells were implanted into mice to form tumors

 

The liposomal curcumin formulation was found to inhibit pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro, and when administered to the animals intraperitoneally at a dose of 20 mg/kg, three-times a week for four weeks, a 42% suppression of tumor growth was observed compared to untreated controls.  This would be the equivalent of 1,360 mg for a 150 lb adult.  Note, the 20 mg/kg dose given to the test animals is 100 times lower than the LD50 for mice (i.e. the dose that would take to kill 50% of a test group).

 

Additionally, researchers observed "A potent antiangiogenic effect," characterized by a reduced number blood vessels and other pro-angiogenic factors associated with the growth of the tumor's blood supply.  

 

The researchers concluded, "These data clearly establish the efficacy of liposomal curcumin in reducing human pancreatic cancer growth in the examined model. The therapeutic curcumin-based effects, with no limiting side-effects, suggest that liposomal curcumin may be beneficial in patients with pancreatic cancer."


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

Pomegranate Juice Augments Memory and fMRI Activity in Middle-Aged and Older Adults with Mild Memory Complaints

Pomegranate Juice Augments Memory and fMRI Activity in Middle-Aged and Older Adults with Mild Memory Complaints | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

Despite increasing emphasis on the potential of dietary antioxidants in preventing memory loss and on diet as a precursor of neurological health, rigorous studies investigating the cognitive effects of foods and their components are rare. Recent animal studies have reported memory and other cognitive benefits of polyphenols, found abundantly in pomegranate juice. We performed a preliminary, placebo-controlled randomized trial of pomegranate juice in older subjects with age-associated memory complaints using memory testing and functional brain activation (fMRI) as outcome measures. Thirty-two subjects (28 completers) were randomly assigned to drink 8 ounces of either pomegranate juice or a flavor-matched placebo drink for 4 weeks. Subjects received memory testing, fMRI scans during cognitive tasks, and blood draws for peripheral biomarkers before and after the intervention. Investigators and subjects were all blind to group membership. After 4 weeks, only the pomegranate group showed a significant improvement in the Buschke selective reminding test of verbal memory and a significant increase in plasma trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and urolithin A-glucuronide. Furthermore, compared to the placebo group, the pomegranate group had increased fMRI activity during verbal and visual memory tasks. While preliminary, these results suggest a role for pomegranate juice in augmenting memory function through task-related increases in functional brain activity.


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
Blair Kettle's curator insight, October 18, 2013 7:18 PM

Randomized controlled trials show that after four weeks of drinking 8 ounces of pomegranate juice daily older adult subjects with memory complaints performed significantly better on a test of verbal memory than the placebo group who consumed a flavour-matched drink. The benefit is in the polyphenols that are abundant in pomegranate juice.

Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

Omega-3 fatty acids offer cancer potential: Lab study

Omega-3 fatty acids offer cancer potential: Lab study | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it
Omega-3s - in particular eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) - may offer benefits to people with certain cancers, according to new lab work suggesting that the fatty acids may help kill off cancerous cells.

Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from Vitae Herbae (herbal, natural, integrative medicine & health)
Scoop.it!

Antioxidants, Mitochondrial Damage, and Human Aging - Life Extension

Antioxidants, Mitochondrial Damage, and Human Aging - Life Extension | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

By Edward R. Rosick, DO, MPH, MS

 

"Throughout history, scientists have sought strategies for warding off the seemingly inevitable processes of aging and death.In recent decades, the free radical theory of aging has shed light on the degenerative changes that occur as people grow older.This theory holds that the body produces reactive, unstable agents known as free radicals during normal metabolism and following exposure to ultraviolet light or environmental toxins. While natural antidotes to these free radicals—internally produced antioxidants—are abundant in youth, their levels decline with age." 


Via Pasquale Valente
more...
Pasquale Valente's curator insight, August 30, 2013 4:18 AM

Numerous antioxidants—lipoic acid, green tea polyphenols, lycopene, and vitamins A, C, and E—have been associated with protection against many afflictions that commonly accompany aging.

Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

Blueberries cut type-2 diabetes risk

Blueberries cut type-2 diabetes risk | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

 

Eating more fruit, particularly blueberries, apples and grapes, is linked to a reduced risk of developing type-2 diabetes, suggests a study in the British Medical Journal.

 

Blueberries cut the risk by 26% compared with 2% for three servings of any whole fruit - but fruit juice did not appear to have the same effect.

The research looked at the diets of more than 187,000 people in the US.

 

But Diabetes UK said the results of the study should be treated with caution.

Researchers from the UK, US and Singapore used data from three large studies of nurses and health professionals in the US to examine the link between fruit consumption and the risk of contracting type-2 diabetes.


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from Vitae Herbae (herbal, natural, integrative medicine & health)
Scoop.it!

Walnut consumption is associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women. [J Nutr. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Walnut consumption is associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women.  [J Nutr. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

Abstract

Walnuts are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and have been shown to improve various cardiometabolic risk factors. We aimed to investigate the association between walnut intake and incident type 2 diabetes in 2 large cohort studies: the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHS II. We prospectively followed 58,063 women aged 52-77 y in NHS (1998-2008) and 79,893 women aged 35-52 y in NHS II (1999-2009) without diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer at baseline. Consumption of walnuts and other nuts was assessed every 4 y using validated food frequency questionnaires. Self-reported type 2 diabetes was confirmed by a validated supplemental questionnaire. We documented a total of 5930 incident type 2 diabetes cases during 10 y of follow-up. In the multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards model without body mass index (BMI), walnut consumption was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, and the HRs (95% CIs) for participants consuming 1-3 servings/mo (1 serving = 28 g), 1 serving/wk, and ≥2 servings/wk of walnuts were 0.93 (0.88-0.99), 0.81 (0.70-0.94), and 0.67 (0.54-0.82) compared with women who never/rarely consumed walnuts (P-trend < 0.001). Further adjustment for updated BMI slightly attenuated the association and the HRs (95% CIs) were 0.96 (0.90-1.02), 0.87 (0.75-1.01), and 0.76 (0.62-0.94), respectively (P-trend = 0.002). The consumption of total nuts (P-trend < 0.001) and other tree nuts (P-trend = 0.03) was also inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes, and the associations were largely explained by BMI. Our results suggest that higher walnut consumption is associated with a significantly lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women.


Via Pasquale Valente
more...
Pasquale Valente's curator insight, September 5, 2013 8:53 AM

"results suggest that higher walnut consumption is associated with a significantly lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women."

Pasquale Valente's comment, September 5, 2013 8:58 AM
mice that eat an abundance of walnuts may be less likely to develop breast cancer http://www.scientificamerican.com/blog/post.cfm?id=walnuts-ward-off-breast-cancer-in-m-2009-04-22
Rescooped by Ari J Lieberman from A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

How antibiotics enable pathogenic gut infections

How antibiotics enable pathogenic gut infections | Natural plant extracts | Scoop.it

 

 

A new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine could help pinpoint ways to counter the effects of the antibiotics-driven depletion of friendly, gut-dwelling bacteria.

 

 

A number of intestinal pathogens can cause problems after antibiotic administration, said Justin Sonnenburg, PhD, assistant professor of microbiology and immunology and the senior author of the study, to be published online Sept. 1 in Nature. Graduate students Katharine Ng and Jessica Ferreyra shared lead authorship.

 

 

“Antibiotics open the door for these pathogens to take hold. But how, exactly, that occurs hasn’t been well understood,” Sonnenburg said.

 

 

In the first 24 hours after administration of oral antibiotics, a spike in carbohydrate availability takes place in the gut, the study says. This transient nutrient surplus, combined with the reduction of friendly gut-dwelling bacteria due to antibiotics, permits at least two potentially deadly pathogens to get a toehold in that otherwise more forbidding environment.


Via Jonathan Middleton
more...
No comment yet.