Natural Pest Control
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Natural Pest Control
Using natural enemies, predators or parasites of plant pests and other wise methods of pest control
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Syngenta to acquire Pasteuria Bioscience - Sacramento Bee

Syngenta to acquire Pasteuria Bioscience - Sacramento Bee | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

Syngenta to acquire Pasteuria Bioscience Sacramento Bee.

The first product will be a seed treatment for soybean cyst nematode to be launched in the USA in 2014. Under the terms of the ...

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Pollinators, Predators and Pests - Ooooby

Pollinators, Predators and Pests - Ooooby | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it
Insects perform important functions in our ecosystem. They aerate the soil, pollinate blossoms, control insect and plant pests, and decompose organic matter, thereby reintroducing nutrients into the soil.
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Organic Eprints - Monitoring Agriotes lineatus and A. obscurus in organic production using pheromone traps

Organic Eprints - Monitoring Agriotes lineatus and A. obscurus in organic production using pheromone traps | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

Wireworms, particularly Agriotes lineatus and A. obscurus are becoming a problem in organic crop production causing economically severe damage on potatoes and other arable crops. Since pesticide application for direct control is not allowed in organic farming, reliable methods for quantifying wireworm infestation levels and forecasting damage are urgently needed for any control strategy. In the present work, the assessment of the range of attractiveness of pheromone traps to male A. lineatus and A. obscurus beetles was investigated in 2006 and 2007. The results indicated that the trap recovery rate of released beetles was more dependent on release distance than on time. Recovery rates greater than 40% were only noted for short release distances (up to 10 m), while less than 10% of the beetles released at a distance of 60 m returned to the traps. Recovery rates of click beetles were also negatively affected by cold and wet weather conditions. Most of the beetles were recovered within the first 3 days.

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Inhibitory Effects of Essential Oils for Controlling Phytophthora capsici

Inhibitory Effects of Essential Oils for Controlling Phytophthora capsici | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

Essential oils (EOs) were studied in vitro and in vivo for inhibiting Phytophthora capsici. Mycelial growth of P. capsici was examined on EO-amended media or after exposing it to EO volatiles. The efficacy of EOs was determined by estimating the effective concentration for 50% inhibition of P. capsici mycelial growth (EC50).

The results taken together suggest that oregano, red thyme, and palmarosa EOs may be potential components for integrated management of P. capsici.


Plant Disease, Volume 96, Issue 6, Page 797-803, June 2012.

By Yang Bi, He Jiang, Mary K. Hausbeck, and Jianjun J. Hao, Department of Plant Pathology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-11-11-0933

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Grafting Tomato to Manage Bacterial Wilt Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in the Southeastern United States

Grafting Tomato to Manage Bacterial Wilt Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in the Southeastern United States | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

Bacterial wilt, caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, can result in severe losses to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) growers in the southeastern United States, and grafting with resistant rootstocks may be an effective strategy for managing this disease.

Plant Disease, Volume 96, Issue 7, Page 973-978, July 2012.

By C. L. Rivard, Department of Plant Pathology, S. O'Connell and M. M. Peet, Department of Horticultural Science, and R. M. Welker and F. J. Louws, Department of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-12-10-0877

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Getting rid of Early Blight

Non-chemical disease control - use hands and the head.

 

"Early tomato blight" sounds scary. Leaves turn yellow, curl up and die. Your tomato plant looks like the grim reaper took a crap on it. Don't worry one bit!

 

These tips maybe won't work in humide climate. There you would need to hide plants under the roof...

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Pest Control Methods That Don't Involve Chemicals

Pest Control Methods That Don't Involve Chemicals | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

Can Non Chemical Strategies for Managing Pests like Exclusion or Clean Sanitation be used also in plant production?

The usefulness of non-chemical approaches is dependent upon the understanding of pest ecology, biology, and behavior. However, this understanding isn't really required when using the synthetic pesticides. 

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MY GREEN SIDE · Green Tip – Healthy Lawns and Healthy Families

MY GREEN SIDE · Green Tip – Healthy Lawns and Healthy Families | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

This overall perspective is one of the principles behind an integrated pest management (IPM) program, the concept upon which all non-chemical pest control methods are based.

Information and tips for creating a healthy, pesticide-free lawn. Formerly National Coalition Against the Misuse of Pesticides, Beyond Pesticides works with allies in protecting public health and the environment to lead the transition to a world free of toxic pesticides.

 

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Don't destroy research · Sense about Science

Don't destroy research · Sense about Science | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

An appeal from scientists at the publicly funded research; calling for discussion not destruction of trials & research on GMO wheat and seeking support with the petition.

John Pickett, Scientific Leader of Chemical Ecology, Rothamsted Research: “On 27th May 2012 protesters are planning to destroy our Chemical Ecology group’s scientific research because it uses genetically modified wheat. Growing wheat has an environmental toll of extensive insecticide use to control aphid pests. The research, which is non-commercial, is investigating how to reduce that by getting the plants to repel aphids with a natural pheromone. We are appealing for protesters to call off the destruction and discuss the work.”


Sense about Science ?Equipping people to make sense of science and evidence...

...@SeedFeedFood

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Five Arizona Pest Control Tips For Your Garden

Five Arizona Pest Control Tips For Your Garden | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

You can use some non-chemical sprays that often have the effect of giving the vegetation an unsavory taste to them, and this can in turn keep them away. If you put up sticky traps in your garden, you can achieve your objective. These traps have a specific color, so as to attract a certain kind of pest, and if you use them every five feet or so, you’ll have some pretty good results.

BUT:

To get rid of slugs add some bleach into a water spray bottle and spray the liquid all around the house, garden area, backyard, this will help keep the slugs under control. It is said that salt can get this done as well, so if you want to use that in your garden we certainly wouldn’t advise you not to.

 

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Biological Control - A Natural Alternative

US Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Biological Control - A Natural Alternative AVA18029VNB1, 1989.


This presentation deals with the practical and applied aspects of biocontrol by emphasizing strategies such as augmentation, recolonization and inundation. The program includes a definition and brief history of biocontrol along with examples of success.

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Analysis: Food security focus fuels new worries over crop chemicals

Analysis: Food security focus fuels new worries over crop chemicals | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

Reuters: Scientists, environmentalists and farm advocates are pressing the question about whether rewards of the trend toward using more and more crop chemicals are worth the risks, as the agricultural industry strives to ramp up production to feed the world's growing population.

Where industry says regulation is adequate, critics say it is often lacking. They want the government to do more in-depth examination of the impacts of the chemicals in use and change the incentives that encourage farmers to grow more corn and other chemically intensive crops.

One concern is the level of nitrogen fertilizer run-off into water sources. A study released March 13 by researchers at the University of California, Davis, said fertilizers and nitrates from agriculture are contaminating the drinking water for more than 200,000 residents in California's farming communities.

That study came as a separate coalition of water authority officials, pollution control administrators and sustainable agricultural groups calling themselves Health Waters Coalition asked Congress to address excessive use and runoff of agricultural fertilizers in the new Farm Bill.

Farmers are well aware of the poisonous possibilities of the chemicals they use, and must get trained and approved every year to apply pesticides, and take a range of precautions.

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Benefits and risks of exotic biological control agents

Benefits and risks of exotic biological control agents | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

ForumPhyto: InfoFlash for English Readers, 19.03.2012.


The use of exotic (=alien) arthropods in classical and augmentative biological control programs has yielded huge economic and ecological benefits. Exotic species of arthropods have contributed to the suppression of key pests in agriculture and forestry or have aided in restoring natural systems affected by adventive species. However, adverse non-target effects of exotic biological control agents have been observed in a number of projects. Non-target effects range from very small effects, e.g. 2% parasitization on a non-target insect on a local level, to massive effects on a large scale. Until now, no consensus on how to judge the magnitude of non-target effects and whether these effects can be tolerated or are unacceptable has emerged. In this paper, we briefly review both the benefits of biological control as well as the associated risks including to human and animal health, plant health and particularly the environment


De Clercq P, Mason PG, Babendreier D (2012)  Benefits and risks of exotic biological control agents Special Issue: Invasive Alien Arthropod Predators and Parasitoids: An Ecological Approach. Biocontrol Volume 56, Number 4, 681-698, DOI: 10.1007/s10526-011-9372-8


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Earthworm collects weed seeds

This is a timelapse video of the common nightcrawler earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) gathering seeds of giant ragweed (Ambrosia trifida).
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Sustaining Farming on the Urban Fringe: Organic Farm Calls ...

Aerated Compost Tea is not to be confused with soil application composts, or un-composted mulches, which have been documented to suppress soil-borne plant diseases through a variety of mechanisms. Aerated Compost Tea is not compost ...
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EPA grants exemption to MSU ag technology to fight potato virus - Montana State University

EPA grants exemption to MSU ag technology to fight potato virus - Montana State University | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

BOZEMAN - A biological pesticide developed at Montana State University will enter the fight this month to control a threat to Montana's $38 million seed potato industry after receiving a provisional go-ahead from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. EPA's emergency exemption for Certis USA's product BmJ WG (Bacillus mycoides isolate J) will allow Montana growers to use the agent discovered by researchers with MSU's College of Agriculture to combat potato virus Y, or PVY.

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Effects of Crop Rotation, Cultivar, and Irrigation and Nitrogen Rate on Verticillium Wilt in Cotton

Effects of Crop Rotation, Cultivar, and Irrigation and Nitrogen Rate on Verticillium Wilt in Cotton | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

A field experiment was conducted under center-pivot irrigation in four wedges, with one wedge in continuous cotton (CC) and three wedges in a rotation (ROT) with 2 years cotton and 1 year in sorghum.

Plant Disease, Volume 96, Issue 7, Page 985-989, July 2012.

T. A. Wheeler, J. P. Bordovsky, J. W. Keeling, and B. G. Mullinix, Jr., Texas AgriLife Research and J. E. Woodward, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Lubbock, TX 79403 Inside the Journal

http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-02-11-0111-RE

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Systems Approach Holds Hope for Soybean Cyst Nematode Control - agprofessional.com

Systems Approach Holds Hope for Soybean Cyst Nematode Control - agprofessional.com | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it
Systems Approach Holds Hope for Soybean Cyst Nematode Controlagprofessional.comIf there is a Holy Grail in soybean pest control, a likely contender is soybean cyst nematode (SCN) control. Generally regarded as the most important soybean ...
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Leaf 'stamp' could detect crop diseases - SciDev.Net

Leaf 'stamp' could detect crop diseases - SciDev.Net | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

A technique that stamps biosensors directly onto the leaves of plants could be used as an early-warning system for crop diseases. Farmers will be able to isolate a diseased plant to prevent the spread of diseases.

 

Around 30 per cent of maize in Tanzania is contaminated with aflatoxin - a consequence of infection by fungi such as Aspergillus and Fusarium, which produce mycotoxins. Mycotoxins stunt children's growth, cause liver cancer and suppress the immune system. The UN Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that mycotoxins infect around a quarter of the world's crops every year, wasting one billion metric tons of food.

The Gates Foundation's Grand Challenges Explorations fund provides grants of US$100,000 for innovative 18-month projects for development of colorimetric tests -a self-inking stamp that delivers the chemicals that detect the toxins directly into plant leaf veins, possibly via fine needles incorporated into the stamp to ensure the reagents get inside. The stamp could be used 200 times and might cost US$10.

via @IPPCnews

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Agricultural bacteria: Blowing in the wind

Agricultural bacteria: Blowing in the wind | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

The 1930s Dust Bowl proved what a disastrous effect wind can have on dry, unprotected topsoil.

Helping farmers and land managers adopt practices that better conserve soil is one of the main goals of the USDA-ARS team's work. In the Southern High Plains region, for example, intense cultivation of soil combined with a semi-arid climate can result in serious wind erosion problems. In fact, last summer's drought brought Dust Bowl-like conditions to the area.

It can take years, however, for farmers who've adopted new management practices to detect noticeable changes in levels of soil organic matter and other traditional soil quality measures. This is why researchers have been analyzing soils with pyrosequencing, a method that yields a fingerprint of an entire microbial community, and well as identifies specific groups and species of bacteria based on their unique DNA sequences.

 

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Tiny wasp may hold key to controlling kudzu bug - Online Athens

Tiny wasp may hold key to controlling kudzu bug - Online Athens | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

The egg parasitoid Paratelenomus saccharalis attacking eggs of Megacopta (image provided by Keiji Takasu)

 

Tiny wasp may hold key to controlling kudzu bug Online Athens“Using classical biological control is an option in the tool kit,” said Ruberson, an entomologist in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Ruberson’s parasitoid of choice is Paratelenomus saccharalis, a tiny wasp no larger than the period at the end of this sentence. The wasp lays its own egg in each kudzu bug egg, and the developing wasp larva destroys the kudzu bug egg as it develops.  

The kudzu bug was first spotted in Georgia in the fall of 2009. It feeds on kudzu, soybeans and other legumes and has become a nuisance to homeowners and a threat to international trade as an agricultural contaminant.

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Making food safe: Two projects to combat mycotoxin contamination in Tanzania ... - Newstime Africa

Making food safe: Two projects to combat mycotoxin contamination in Tanzania ... - Newstime Africa | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

Making food safe:

Two projects to combat mycotoxin contamination in Tanzania by International Institute of Tropical Agriculture. The second initiative seeks to develop a safe and natural biocontrol technology that can effectively reduce aflatoxin contamination of maize. Aflatoxin is produced by a fungus, Aspergillus flavus. Researchers identifed the naturally occurring non-toxic strains ‘the good fungus’ that can out-compete, displace and drastically reduce the population of their poisonous cousins ‘the bad fungus’. It has been successfully piloted in Nigeria under the name Aflasafe where it has been shown to reduce contamination by up to 99%....Original article submitted by Catherine Njuguna.

 

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Common Bean Productivity Research for Global Food Security Competitive Grants Program

Common Bean Productivity Research for Global Food Security Competitive Grants Program | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

The National Institutes of Food and Agriculture is set to administer funds in the amount of $4,500,000. The NIFA strongly encourages the applicants to concentrate on the following bean production research (BPR) areas:

a) Reducing Production Constraints from Soil Borne Pathogens - Soil borne pathogen pressure on common bean is considered a significant constraint to bean production. Such pathogens and associated root rots already reduce production in areas with high rainfall, and as instances of rainfall increases, the issue is deemed to be more limiting.

b) Improving Transformation Technologies - The process of successful transformation of the bean has always been very much limited. The program organizers perceive that the development new methodologies and approaches in the area of transformation technology is very much essential in removing the roadblocks to transformation.

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NATURAL INSECT CONTROL IN THE GARDEN

NATURAL INSECT CONTROL IN THE GARDEN | Natural Pest Control | Scoop.it

The majority of insects you find in your garden are actually harmless and require no intervention. They are either nature’s helpers or food sources for nature’s helpers. For those insects that do pose a threat to some of your plants there are several non-invasive solutions you can utilize to prevent, monitor and control these pest insects.

This approach to pest management is called IPM or integrated pest management. Their premise is simple, begin with the least invasive and most environmentally sound treatments, gradually working your way up to the more invasive treatments (only if it becomes necessary).

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Integrated pest management that addresses regional and environmental issues

PubMed Central


Agricultural, environmental, and social and policy interests have influenced integrated pest management (IPM) from its inception. The first 50 years of IPM paid special attention to field-based management and market-driven decision making. Concurrently, IPM strategies became available that were best applied both within and beyond the bounds of individual fields and that also provided environmental benefits. This generated an incentives dilemma for farmers: selecting IPM activities for individual fields on the basis of market-based economics versus selecting IPM activities best applied regionally that have longer-term benefits, including environmental benefits, that accrue to the broader community as well as the farmer.


Brewer MJ, Goodell PB (2012) Approaches and incentives to implement integrated pest management that addresses regional and environmental issues. Annu Rev Entomol. 2012;57:41-59. Epub 2011 Aug 29.

Texas AgriLife Research & Department

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