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Pars Rescue Robot Prototype Tested

Pars Rescue Robot Prototype Tested | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
You may recall our story in March of this year that described the Pars rescue robot concept developed by RTS Lab in Tehran, Iran.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
The Planetary Archives Digital University's insight:

Cool!

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Stop the Navy's Plan to Bomb a Pacific Paradise

Stop the Navy's Plan to Bomb a Pacific Paradise | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
As part of a larger move to expand war training in American waters and territories throughout the world, the U.S. Navy is planning to ramp up war games on two islands in the Pacific's Northern Mariana Islands -- Tinian and Pagan -- a deadly proposal we need your help to stop.
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Did You Know? - Hemp History Week

Did You Know? - Hemp History Week | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
Thomas Jefferson once said, “Hemp is of greatest importance to our nation.” Boy, did he have the long view. Today, the U.S. hemp industry has estimated annual retail sales of $500 million dollars.
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Study predicts impending collapse of industrial civilization

Study predicts impending collapse of industrial civilization | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it

It happened to the Roman, Han, Gupta, and Mauryan empires, and now University of Maryland researchers Safa Motesharrei and Eugenia Kalnay, and University of Minnesota’s Jorge Rivas warn that utter destruction could befall our global economy as well. Working with a framework that incorporates mathematical analysis, social science, and observation of natural phenomena, the ‘Human And Nature Dynamical’ (HANDY) model projects “business as usual” could lead to the end of industrialized civilization. Accepted for publication in the Elsevier Journal of Ecological Economics, the study finds ample historical evidence that overpopulation, failing agriculture, limited access to water, energy consumption, and the unequal distribution of wealth could all combine to spell the end for society as we know it.


Via Société Française de Prospective
The Planetary Archives Digital University's insight:

Finally, the demise of the Holy Roman Empire is at hand.....

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The Coming Merge of Human and Machine Intelligence - Deep Stuff

The Coming Merge of Human and Machine Intelligence - Deep Stuff | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it

“Technology now exists to connect people’s brains to the Internet, and it’s giving rise to a new way of thinking, according to an alum's best-selling book”


Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET, Murray Campbell
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unit 5. How your food would look if not genetically modified over millennia | Genetic Literacy Project

unit 5. How your food would look if not genetically modified over millennia | Genetic Literacy Project | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
How your food would look if not genetically modified over millennia | February 2, 2015 | Genetic Literacy Project

Via Mrs. B, Ethan Bernick
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Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 1:04 PM

Biotechnology, including genetically modified organisms (GMO)-


This article explains how your food would look like without GMO's today, and how they look and seem completely different. Without the agriculture used over millennia, and the constant picking of best crops by farmers, our food would not be as good as it is today.


This article portrays the idea of how our adaptions of agriculture has saved us through GMO's or the picking of best crops. Without these pickings, we would not be able to farm as well as we do today, and would not have the tasty food we have.

Ethan Bernick's curator insight, March 24, 1:29 PM

This article is misinformed and is saying that hybridization is no different than genetic modification. 

zane alan berger's curator insight, March 24, 3:36 PM

This article relating to unit 5 (agriculture) reveals the reality of what our foods would be like without GMO's, as well as noting that a lot of our "organic" foods were chemically created

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A new Industrial Revolution is coming

A new Industrial Revolution is coming | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
Over the past 25 years, the Internet has radically altered the way people communicate and share ideas and the way businesses interact with customers and clients.

For an even longer period, starting in the 1950s with the so-called Third Industrial Revolution, businesses have become more digitized. In the next few decades, a new industrial revolution will combine elements of these two trends, along with related technologies and practices, into a truly "smart" manufacturing process.

This convergence is known as the Industrial Internet, Industry 4.0 or the Industrial Internet of Things. Whatever the name, the result will profoundly affect global trade patterns, supply chains and societies. The impact will vary, presenting many opportunities for developed countries to be more disruptive in developing economies and possibly limiting the use of low-end manufacturing for quick modernization and development.

Nonetheless, this Fourth Industrial Revolution will change manufacturing, industry and society.

Via Steve Krogull, Max Minard
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Megan Becker's curator insight, May 26, 11:21 PM

Summary: This article outlines the new rising "industrial revolution", in that the rapid diffusion of smart phones, internet, and other new technologies is leading to the rise of a new era. In theory, this will impact global trade patterns and social/economic structures.

 

Insight: This article relates to unit 6 in that, although the major Industrial Revolution occurred long ago, the rise in electronics and improved technology goes above any standards set before, calling for a new era in itself. The widespread diffusion and use of technology is leading to an incredibly connected world.

 

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 27, 7:32 AM

Unit 6

This is an article about how we are currently undergoing what may become known as the fourth industrial revolution. The writer of this article believes this revolution to have started around the 1950s and to still be strongly going. This revolution is the technology revolution, with the use of the internet and technology as its main focuses. The internet has enabled people to be so interconnected, has provided for incredible amounts of data avaliability, and has created as well as destroyed many jobs. Many new technologies, such as remote sensing are rising with this revolution as well, and it is completely changing our workforce and how we operate and what markets are available.

This relates to human geography, because while it is important to have a solid historical background on previous industrial revolutions, its important to be able to analyze and apply how this one is different and similar, and what the effects of it may be culturally, economically, and politically. 

Brandon Chesney's curator insight, May 27, 9:00 AM

A new Revolution of technology will likely come soon combining our technology and our practices. The outcome of this revolution will likely change our trading patterns all around the world dramatically. Another impact is less developed country will have a chance to make a bigger impact and will limit the low end manufacturing.

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Landmark Lawsuit Challenges U.S. Approval of Deep-sea Mineral Mining

Landmark Lawsuit Challenges U.S. Approval of Deep-sea Mineral Mining | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it

SAN FRANCISCO— The Center for Biological Diversity sued the U.S. government today over its first-ever approval for large-scale deep-sea mining, a destructive project between Hawaii and Mexico that would damage important habitat for whales, sharks and sea turtles and wipe out seafloor ecosystems.


Loggerhead sea turtle photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons/Damien DuToit. This photo is available for media use.

The lawsuit targets the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for issuing and renewing exploratory permits for the work before completing environmental impact studies required by federal law. This is the first major legal challenge to an emerging global industry that is seeking to extract gold, nickel, copper and other increasingly valuable metals and minerals from the seabed beneath international waters.

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The next big war might be over phosphorus

The next big war might be over phosphorus | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
A new study of soil warns that we're pushing the limits of our planetary skin and in danger of pulling nutrients out of the earth too fast.
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This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years

This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
The USGS says sea-level rise and sinking could claim up to 4,677 square miles of land along the coast if the state doesn’t implement major restoration plans.
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Chickens From Hell And Cartwheeling Spiders: The Top 10 New Species 2015

Chickens From Hell And Cartwheeling Spiders: The Top 10 New Species 2015 | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
Happy (almost) Birthday Carl Linnaeus! The "father of taxonomy," who established the first universally accepted way of classifying animals and plants, was born in southern Sweden on May 23, 1707. He started with simply dividing the world into three kingdoms—plants, animals and minerals—and then proceeded to classify them depending on their appearance, eventually giving all living things a simple two-part Latin name, which biologists still do to this day.
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Goal-Guardians - Endangered Grizzly Bears | Endangered Species Act

Goal-Guardians - Endangered Grizzly Bears | Endangered Species Act | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
CODY, WY.  05-2015  --  James Walks Along was forced to abandon an address to the Yellowstone Ecosystem Subcommittee (YES) of the joint federal and state Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (IGBC) by Brian Nesvik,  IGBC Chair and Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) Wildlife Division Chief,  at the committee’s spring meeting in Cody, Wyoming. 
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GreenBox

GreenBox | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
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The Planetary Archives Digital University's curator insight, May 15, 11:51 AM

So, you CAN reinvent the wheel!

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CDC Map Reveals ‘Most Distinctive’ Cause Of Death State by State

CDC Map Reveals ‘Most Distinctive’ Cause Of Death State by State | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
Your geography can have a big impact on how you bite the dust.
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​Mystery of Swiss cheese holes solved after century of research

​Mystery of Swiss cheese holes solved after century of research | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
Theodore Svedberg 3 hours ago

Chris Boone
An entire article just to say an American study was wrong.
No the American was not wrong. He correctly described how the holes were made. What he didn't know was why the bacteria were concentrated in certain spaces. This new result answers that question: the bacteria colonize hay dust particles inside the milk. Dynamics of bacterial colony formation is quite fascinating but only became a topic of serious scientific study in recent decades.

This is how science works. One result is built on top of another.
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This wind turbine has no blades -- and that's why it's better

This wind turbine has no blades -- and that's why it's better | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
The Vortex bladeless turbine uses the wind to vibrate instead of spin. That makes it cheaper, quieter, and more reliable than a bladed turbine.
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▶ Robotics, AI, the end of human work, and a coming Renaissance - YouTube

Kevin Surace discusses the coming of the end of human work. What will we do? TEDxOC talk in Sepotember 2014.

Via Société Française de Prospective
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The Next Big Thing You Missed: How We Can Manufacture Forests Like Toyota Makes Cars

The Next Big Thing You Missed: How We Can Manufacture Forests Like Toyota Makes Cars | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it

For a young industrial engineer, Shubhendu Sharma couldn’t have landed a gig much sweeter than Toyota. As the originator of “just-in-time production,” Toyota pioneered the lean manufacturing movement that helped make it a dominant global automaker. But when a venerable Japanese forestry expert visited the company’s Bangalore factory to plant some greenery, Sharma was captivated by the idea of engineering a new kind of efficiency.

 

He wondered if Toyota’s wildly successful strategy for quickly and efficiently making cars could be applied to growing trees. The result is a startup called Afforestt.
***
By repurposing the basic model behind Toyota’s car-making process, Sharma believes he has developed a system that can compress the process of reforestation into one-tenth of the time nature would take on its own. “We needed to standardize the process of forest-making,” he explains. “Today, we can make a forest for as low as the cost of an iPhone.”

 

Akira Miyawaki, the forester who inspired Sharma, is an expert in regenerating native habitats on land wrecked by industrialization. His approach involves densely planting dozens of native species to encourage a full-blown ecosystem to quickly take root. Sharama’s goal with Afforestt, which he founded in 2011, is to adapt Miyawaki’s approach for ready use anywhere in the world. In the unavoidable jargon of the startup world, he wants to create a platform for forest-making.
***
Afforestt is a for-profit company that has worked with corporate and government clients on reforestation projects. Its broader goal, Sharma said during a recent talk at the TED ideas conference in Vancouver, is to open-source the approach to create a one-click system. Part of that effort involves creating a database that would give anyone in the world what amounts to a shopping list of native plants they need to seed a new forest. Internet-connected soil probes also could let Afforestt monitor forest growth from afar and help would-be urban foresters anywhere on their progress.


Via Sam Radcliffe, Savannah Rains
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Sam Radcliffe's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:30 AM

If you can "make a forest for the cost of an iPhone" then I guess we have to define what you mean by "forest".

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 1:57 AM

This scoop is about the industrialization of nature and essentially turning it into an effective assembly line item like cars or other goods. What this means is a young engineer has come up with an idea to reverse the effects of deforestation and plant trees and grow forests in as little as a year. This would help the environment, lower temperatures, and cause a tremendous uproar around the world, causing life to improve. 

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Megacities pose serious health challenge

Megacities pose serious health challenge | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it

Rapid urbanization will take a heavy toll on public health if city planning and development do not incorporate measures to tackle air pollution, warns a report launched in Beijing last month.

The report1, compiled by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in Geneva, Switzerland, and the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) project in Boulder, Colorado, was launched as part of the IGAC Open Science Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry in the Anthropocene. A striking point in the report, says Liisa Jalkanen, head of the WMO’s Atmospheric Environment Research Division, is how quickly megacities — metropolitan areas with populations of more than 10 million — are rising in developing countries.

There are now 23 megacities in the world, compared with just two 60 years ago. Just over half of the population currently dwells in cities, and with the urban population expected to nearly double by 2050, that proportion is projected to approach 70%. “Almost all this growth will take place in the developing world,” says Jalkanen.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Max Minard
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Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 4:44 PM

Megacities in general - not a specific one.

 

Max Minard's curator insight, May 26, 11:21 PM

This article highlights major health issues that result from the increase in mega cities. Resulting form rapid urbanization, mega cities continue to grow and pose issues such as an increase in pollution. As the article states, "there are now 23 mega cities in the world." and "just over half of the population currently dwells in cities." Nations such as China and Japan have already experienced large amounts of urbanization and are currently struggling in tackling the increasing rates of air pollution. I personally think city planners and developments need to focus on controlling this issue along with researchers coming up with a less toxic renewable resource to use for energy. 

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Uploading human brain for eternal life is possible – Cambridge neuroscientist

Uploading human brain for eternal life is possible – Cambridge neuroscientist | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
People could “live inside a machine” by turning their brain into a program code once a computer capable of recreating some 100 trillion connections is built, a popular Cambridge neuroscientist said at a UK mass event this weekend.
The Planetary Archives Digital University's insight:

Uh, no thanks.....

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Opinion: Is Israel America’s Friend? Or America's Enemy?

Opinion: Is Israel America’s Friend? Or America's Enemy? | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
Countries throughout history have changed from allies to enemies and back again. Nothing is permanent in history. Israel is now an enemy, and apparently has been for a long time, and should be treated as such. They’ve been given more than enough time to cease being an apartheid State like South Africa used to be. Whereas South Africa evolved to a democracy, Israel remains racist. Unless the United States wishes to return to the era of Reagan and before — the era of accepting racism as State policy in an allied country — the U.S. has no moral choice but to switch to supporting, openly, the Palestinians. The Palestinians have every right to reject, and rebel against, Israel’s racism. Israel’s clear determination to continue the military occupation over them gives the Palestinians the right to do what they must to establish their own state, even to take over all of Israel if that’s the only option that the military occupiers offer as an alternative to permanent military occupation and oppression.
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The Navy gears up for huge war games in Alaska -- wildlife and environment be damned

The Navy gears up for huge war games in Alaska -- wildlife and environment be damned | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
In 2013, U.S. Navy researchers predicted ice-free summer Arctic waters by 2016 and it looks as if that prediction might come true. Recently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported that there was less ice in the Arctic this winter than in any other winter of the satellite era. Given that the Navy has been making plans for “ice-free” operations in the Arctic since at least 2001, their June “Northern Edge” exercises may well prove to be just the opening salvo in the future northern climate wars, with whales, seals, and salmon being the first in the line of fire.
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Tiny $9 computer CHIP rocks Kickstarter, promising tons of free apps

Tiny $9 computer CHIP rocks Kickstarter, promising tons of free apps | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
A $9 computer created in California, does everything any average family PC is supposed to do including surfing, programming and entertainment. The tiny gadget has raised more than $1.5 million on Kickstarter – 30 times more than its developers asked for.
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Researchers Reveal The First Warm-Blooded Fish

Researchers Reveal The First Warm-Blooded Fish | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
The deep ocean is a pretty chilly place. Unless you’re a warm-blooded whale or leatherback turtle, the odds are that the cold will make you slow and sluggish as you try to conserve energy. Not so for the opah, or moonfish. It might not look like a candidate for fastest fish in the sea, but these creatures, despite living up to 305 meters (1,000 ft) down, can hold their own against tuna and swordfish.
The Planetary Archives Digital University's insight:

Opah!

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'In Danger' Status Sought for Mexico's Gulf of California World Heritage Area

'In Danger' Status Sought for Mexico's Gulf of California World Heritage Area | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it

“Mexico’s Gulf of California World Heritage Area holds some of the world’s most incredible biodiversity and two of the world’s rarest species — the vaquita and the totoaba,” said Sarah Uhlemann, international program director at the Center for Biological Diversity. “But time is running out. If Mexico doesn’t fully and permanently protect the area, these species will vanish forever.”

 

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CBD May Prevent Cardiac Damage Caused By Doxorubicin

CBD May Prevent Cardiac Damage Caused By Doxorubicin | Natural History, Environment, Science, & Robots | Scoop.it
A Saudi Arabian study shows CBD can reduce the amount of cardiac damage sustained from using Doxorubicin (a form of chemotherapy).

Via Daniel Gonzales
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