Natural Disasters
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It's not just Sandy: U.S. hit by record droughts, fires, and heatwaves in 2012

It's not just Sandy: U.S. hit by record droughts, fires, and heatwaves in 2012 | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
As the devastation wrought by Hurricane Sandy—killing over 100 people and producing upwards of $50 billion in damage along the U.S. East Coast—has reignited a long-dormant conversation on climate change in the media, it's important to note that this is not the only weird and wild weather the U.S. has seen this year.

 

In fact, 2012 has been a year of record-breaking weather across the U.S.: the worst drought in decades, unprecedented heatwaves, and monster forest fires. While climatologists have long stated that it is not yet possible to blame a single extreme weather event on climate change, research is showing that rising temperatures are very likely increasing the chances of extreme weather events and worsening them when they occur.

 


Via David Rowing, Alan Yoshioka
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Jordan Zemanek's comment, September 27, 2013 9:38 AM
The mix of the drought, and the extreme heat seems to have been a major factor in all of these natural disasters lately. Since the heat that arrived in mid spring brought along summer weather, I think with was a spark that ignited the flame for several things like the drought, fires, and other things. The way hurricane Sandy relates to all of this is by the water expanding due to the heat, and adding on too more storm surges, and heavier rain due to evaporation. The increased precipitation has majorly affected how Hurricane Sandy behaved and that blows me away.
Kayla Langstraat's comment, October 1, 2013 9:46 AM
I don't think there is really that much that the United States can do about the problems with the weather, heat and drought. They can't change the weather, but they can find ways to better control wild fires and maybe they could figure out a way to use ocean water to irrigate the land so it's not quite as dry. This would probably cost more money than it would save though. There isn't really much we can do to stop hurricanes and wild fires.
Sarah Peterson's comment, October 1, 2013 9:47 AM
This was a great article. I never knew that some of these things could have been results and factors to all the different natural disasters we have had in the United States. The weather here has been very odd and it's interesting how Hurricane Sandy relates to all of this. It's also interesting how all these things could relate to the climate changes we have been having.
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Recent Earthquakes Canada - Southern Nunavut & Nunavik

Recent Earthquakes Canada  - Southern Nunavut & Nunavik | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
EarthquakesCanada main index - Southern Nunavut...

2011-07-25: M=4.2 - 30 km N of Resolution Island, NU

2011-07-06: M=4.1 - 310 km E of Killiniq, QC

2010-12-04: M=4.6 - 136 km NNE of Baker Lake, NU

2009-07-21: M=4.5 - 14 km ENE of Clyde River, NU

2008-02-14: M=4.6 - near Resolute, NU


Via Northern_Clips
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Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:08 PM
The information in this source gives me a good picture on what actually happens in a lot of areas in Canada. The earthquakes seem to be happening within months, if not weeks of each other. Of course you can't do much to stop something like this, but hopefully the areas affected by these random earthquakes adjust by building structures that can withstand natural disasters like this one.
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Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in Brooklyn With My Fuji X-Pro1 And X100 | Patrick Leong

Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in Brooklyn With My Fuji X-Pro1 And X100 | Patrick Leong | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

 

Hey everyone, what a night! Hurricane Sandy sure left a mess here in New York! Some of the roads are just beginning to open up but no trains for quite some time. The stations are completely flooded! Mayor Bloomberg said there may be buses tomorrow but they will be limited. There are people still without power. Since I couldn’t get into Manhattan, I thought I’d walk around my neighborhood to check out the damage that Hurricane Sandy left here. Since my M9 is not with me anymore (it’s on consignment for the new Leica M), I decided to walk around with my Fuji X-Pro1 and X100. I carried my X100 with me because I wanted to use it a bit more before I sell it for the Fuji X-E1. Here are the photos, I hope you all enjoy them. I hope everyone is safe here in the East Coast! Feel free to leave a comment if you live in New York or New Jersey if you have anything to say about Hurricane Sandy (or anyone else ). Take care everyone and stay safe!


Via Thomas Menk
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Remington Schroder's comment, October 3, 2013 9:29 PM
Natural disasters are horrible because there is never anything positive that some with the outcome.
Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:06 PM
In this article, it covers major things that affected all of New York. Just from this small example of what it did to a single town, you can only imagine the widespread damage across the state. Trees all of the way to lamp posts were destroyed. I think that the community should have got together and cleaned up to be positive about the situation.
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Historic Flooding Across Colorado

Historic Flooding Across Colorado | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Over the past few days, a 4,500-square-mile area across Colorado's Front Range has been hit by devastating floods, leaving at least six dead, forcing thousands to evacuate, and destroying thousands of homes and farms...

Via SustainOurEarth
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Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:24 PM
With all of the picture shown, and all of the destruction shown, it is fair to say that this is one of the worst floods in Colorado history. Fortunetly, very few people have died. The evacuation going on to help get people out is tremendous due to all of the hard work they have been doing. 4,500 square miles have been flooded and that blows me away! That is an incredible amount of area and I had no idea that the flood was THAT bad.
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Ontario, Quebec clean up after powerful storms - CBC.ca

Ontario, Quebec clean up after powerful storms - CBC.ca | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

CBC.ca Ontario, Quebec clean up after powerful storms CBC.ca Southern Ontario and Quebec are cleaning up after severe storms swept across central Canada Friday, killing one person, injuring many others and leaving thousands without power.


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Kayla Langstraat's comment, October 1, 2013 9:49 AM
I'm surprised that the United Staes hasn't tried to help clean up. Although, we can't really afford it. The best thing for places hit by bad weather to do is to join together and help each other out with the clean up. I think they should start by getting the power back on because that would help with clean up and it would help the people who's homes didn't get destroyed to provide for others.The people who were injured should also get help fairly quickly.
Sarah Peterson's comment, October 1, 2013 9:50 AM
I really don't like reading stories about natural disasters like these because I feel like I want to go and help them clean up when really the government should be and other citizens can and should help to if they can. Its amazing to read how many people were without power and to think about what they went through.
Remington Schroder's comment, October 3, 2013 9:28 PM
This is bad because now we have to rebuild houses there while we are building them in other places.
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The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
After cutting a destructive path through the Caribbean, Hurricane Sandy caused extensive damage along the East Coast this week.

 

While the damage wasn't as bad as many feared it could have been, place and spatial context are especially important in assessing the impacts of a natural disaster.  This is a excellent collection of the many devastating images as a result of Hurricane Sandy.  To see some more local images, Rhode Island Department of Transportation put this collection together.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:11 PM
Just with the information given, I can see how much damage the storm actually caused. Flooding and high winds obviously don't go together well. Although some communities weren't hit as bad as previously anticipated, some areas were largely damaged and the money needed to rebuild will be tremendous.
Alaina Rahn's comment, October 4, 2013 10:14 AM
I think it is very sad. I didn't know it was that bad. Now that I see those pictures it makes me feel very bad for those people.
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Massive amounts of charcoal enter the worlds' oceans

Massive amounts of charcoal enter the worlds' oceans | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Bremen, Germany (SPX) Apr 23, 2013 -
Wild fires turn millions of hectares of vegetation into charcoal each year.

Via SustainOurEarth
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Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:20 PM
With the widespread of wildfires in the United States, it only makes sense that charcoal is going everywhere. Since the charcoal doesn't stay in the soil (as previously thought), it is astounding to see how the charcoal is spread through rivers and other waterways into the ocean. From all over the world, water samples are taken and still they find traces of charcoal chemicals, which isn't bad, because charcoal is organic. It's a natural process so I don't think this will affect the environment much other than heating up the world with fire.
Alaina Rahn's comment, October 4, 2013 10:06 AM
I think something needs to be done to contain the charcoal. Th charcoal everywhere is not safe.
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Obama declares major disaster in Colo. (Video) - The Hill's Blog Briefing Room

Obama declares major disaster in Colo. (Video) - The Hill's Blog Briefing Room | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
The action makes available federal aid after severe storms touched off flooding, landslides and mudslides.
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Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:15 PM
It blows me away that these floods seemed to have come out of nowhere. I also find it interesting that this is one of the largest arial recues since Katrina. Sadly, still over 200 people are unaccounted for in Colorado, but it is very good that the government is actually doing something about the floods by providing support by air. In a short amount of time, 1,200 people were evacuated from boulder county. This tells me the air support is working hard to help the people in need of it.