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The 10 Worst U.S Natural Disasters

The 10 Worst U.S Natural Disasters | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Throughout modern history, the failure to prepare and cope with Mother Nature has resulted in catastrophic consequences, from wrecked economies to thousands of lives lost.
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One year later: Japan tsunami aftermath and debris

One year later: Japan tsunami aftermath and debris | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

On March 11, one year will have passed since Japan suffered one of the worst natural disasters and human tragedies in its history.


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Venice 'high water' floods 70% of city

Venice 'high water' floods 70% of city | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

Venetians direct anger at forecasters after 'exceptional and unpredictable' rise in sea waters floods homes and businesses

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Rugged terrain created by volcanos may have prompted human ancestors’ upright walking

Rugged terrain created by volcanos may have prompted human ancestors’ upright walking | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
The rugged landscape created by volcanic eruptions and tectonic plate shifts in east and south Africa millions of years ago may be what prompted our human ancestors to start walking on two legs, a study said Friday.

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Deepest Ocean Volcanoes

Deepest Ocean Volcanoes | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

Scientists believe that 80 percent of the volcanic eruptions on Earth take place in the ocean. Most of these volcanoes are thousands of feet deep, and difficult to find. But in May of 2009, scientists captured the deepest ocean eruption ever found. Nearly 4000 feet below the surface of the Pacific Ocean — in an area between Samoa, Fiji and Tonga - the West Mata volcano was discovered. The explosions of molten rock were spectacular. This volcano was producing Boninite lavas — believed to be among the hottest erupting on Earth.


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Volcanic 'scream' precedes eruption

Volcanic 'scream' precedes eruption | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
A change in the frequency of earthquakes may foretell explosive volcanic eruptions, according to a new study.

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Staying prepared for hurricanes - The Robesonian

Staying prepared for hurricanes - The Robesonian | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Staying prepared for hurricanes The Robesonian Eastern North Carolina is home to some of the most beautiful and pristine coastline in the country, but those of us who have lived in this region all of our lives know well the associated risks of...
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Devastating floods in China trigger huge landslide, burying 40 - The Independent

Devastating floods in China trigger huge landslide, burying 40 - The Independent | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
The Independent Devastating floods in China trigger huge landslide, burying 40 The Independent In nearby Beichuan county, flooding destroyed buildings and exhibits at a memorial for the earthquake five years ago that left 90,000 people missing or...
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CDC Natural Disasters |

CDC Natural Disasters | | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

This site includes facts about natural disasters as well as safety precautions.


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How did human error contribute to the Laingsburg flood? - answered - Baraza

How did human error contribute to the Laingsburg flood? - answered - Baraza | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

From research, there's no human error associated to the Laingsburg flood which was caused by high rise of the Buffels River water level.


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EcoAlert: Strong Link Between Climate Change and Volcanic Eruptions Discovered

EcoAlert: Strong Link Between Climate Change and Volcanic Eruptions Discovered | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
It has long been known that volcanic activity can cause short-term variations in climate.

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15 Breathtaking Photos Of Enormouis Volcanic Eruptions

15 Breathtaking Photos Of Enormouis Volcanic Eruptions | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

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The science behind Hurricane Sandy: a confluence of trouble

The science behind Hurricane Sandy: a confluence of trouble | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
  Hurricane Sandy seems straight out of a Hollywood apocalyptic blockbuster.

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The worst natural disasters in recent history – Features – ABC Environment (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The worst natural disasters in recent history – Features – ABC Environment (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
The Japanese tsunami was an example of Mother Nature at her most destructive. Read ABC Environment's list of seven other entirely natural catastrophes.

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Our Climate Is Headed Toward 'Extremely Dangerous' or 'Catastrophic:' Here's Our Best Off Plan For Staving Off Total Disaster

Our Climate Is Headed Toward 'Extremely Dangerous' or 'Catastrophic:' Here's Our Best Off Plan For Staving Off Total Disaster | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

"Il nostro clima è diretto verso la catastrofe. Qui è il nostro miglior piano per allontanare il totale disastro."

Alex Steffen's new book "Carbon Zero" offers solutions on how to pull us back from the brink of disaster.

November 29, 2012 |

The following excerpt is from the introduction to Alex Steffen's new book, Carbon Zero . The rest of the book is available as chapters on Grist and in ebook form on Amazon . You can learn more about Steffen at his website AlexSteffen.com or follow him on twitter @AlexSteffen.

Forewarned

On Monday the 29th of October, 2012, a tidal surge 13.9 feet high (the highest ever recorded) washed up and over the waterfront in Lower Manhattan, pushed forward by the superstorm Sandy. That same week, the storm destroyed large swathes of coastline from the New Jersey shore to Fire Island, while driving torrential rains, heavy snows, and powerful winds inland across the eastern U.S. and Canada. By the time the storm blew out, it had killed more than 100 Americans, made thousands homeless, left millions without power, and caused at least $50 billion in damage. Sandy was, by any reckoning, one of the worst natural disasters in American history.

....


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Once in a century floods due every ten years | Climate News Network

Once in a century floods due every ten years | Climate News Network | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

Floods during the 21st century are expected to get worse. Really calamitous floods that, during the 20th century were considered once-in-a-century events could come round ever 10 years or so by the end of the 21st century, according to Japanese scientists.

 

Yukiko Hirabayashi of the University of Tokyo and colleagues report in Nature Climate Change that they looked at the likely pattern of hazard in 29 of the world’s great river basins. They considered the risk in those places where greater numbers of people were settled, and used 11 global climate models to project flood dangers by the end of this century.

 

They warn that the frequency of floods will increase in Southeast Asia, Peninsular India, eastern Africa and the northern half of the Andes of South America.

 

Conditions in northern and eastern Europe – the scene of recent and current calamitous flooding – could get less hazardous, along with Anatolia, central Asia, North America and southern South America.

 

The predictions, of course, come with the usual caveat: that the real exposure to flooding will depend to a great extent on what governments finally decide to do about greenhouse emissions, how much the world warms, what water management or flood control plans are put in place and on population growth in the regions at risk.

 

But those lower latitude countries where both population and economic investment are on the increase will have more at stake in the decades to come, and should prepare for greater flood risks.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Megavolcanoes Tied to Pre-Dinosaur Mass Extinction

Megavolcanoes Tied to Pre-Dinosaur Mass Extinction | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

Scientists examining evidence across the world from New Jersey to North Africa say they have linked the abrupt disappearance of half of earth’s species 200 million years ago to a precisely dated set of gigantic volcanic eruptions. The eruptions may have caused climate changes so sudden that many creatures were unable to adapt—possibly on a pace similar to that of human-influenced climate warming today.


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Dinosaur die out might have been second of two closely timed extinctions

Dinosaur die out might have been second of two closely timed extinctions | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

The most-studied mass extinction in Earth history happened 65 million years ago and is widely thought to have wiped out the dinosaurs. New University of Washington research indicates that a separate extinction came shortly before that, triggered by volcanic eruptions that warmed the planet and killed life on the ocean floor.

 

The well-known second event is believed to have been triggered by an asteroid at least 6 miles in diameter slamming into Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula. But new evidence shows that by the time of the asteroid impact, life on the seafloor – mostly species of clams and snails – was already perishing because of the effects of huge volcanic eruptions on the Deccan Plateau in what is now India.

 

“The eruptions started 300,000 to 200,000 years before the impact, and they may have lasted 100,000 years,” said Thomas Tobin, a UW doctoral student in Earth and space sciences. The eruptions would have filled the atmosphere with fine particles, called aerosols, that initially cooled the planet but, more importantly, they also would have spewed carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases to produce long-term warming that led to the first of the two mass extinctions.


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A new Canary Island on the way?

A new Canary Island on the way? | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
An underwater volcano is erupting in Spain's southernmost Canary Island, raising the possibility of the archipelago getting a new member.

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India Declares 5748 Missing in Himalayan Floods - New York Times

India Declares 5748 Missing in Himalayan Floods - New York Times | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
New York Times India Declares 5748 Missing in Himalayan Floods New York Times NEW DELHI – A month after massive flash floods struck the northern state of Uttarakhand, the state's chief minister said Monday that officials will begin distributing...
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Thousands Flee As Northern California Wildfires Spread

Thousands Flee As Northern California Wildfires Spread | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

MANTON, Calif. — A huge wildfire sparked by lightning in Northern California burned to the edge of three small towns Monday, threatening thousands of homes as fearful residents sought safety miles away at an emergency shelter. (August 20, 2012)


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Sandy could bring 'catastrophe,' affect 60 million - CNN.com

Sandy could bring 'catastrophe,' affect 60 million - CNN.com | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Tens of millions of people were hunkered down Monday, bracing for howling winds, torrential downpours and storm surges.

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Volcanic Riddle: Burst in Mount Etna Eruptions Puzzles Experts - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Volcanic Riddle: Burst in Mount Etna Eruptions Puzzles Experts - SPIEGEL ONLINE | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Mount Etna is spitting lava more violently than it has in years, and scientists are baffled as to why. Despite being the world's most-studied volcano, the Sicilian mountain is also its most unpredictable.

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Man Has 'No Hope' Of Defusing A Volcano Like Mister Spock In Star Trek, Says ... - Huffington Post UK

Man Has 'No Hope' Of Defusing A Volcano Like Mister Spock In Star Trek, Says ... - Huffington Post UK | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it
Man Has 'No Hope' Of Defusing A Volcano Like Mister Spock In Star Trek, Says ...
Huffington Post UK
"But there is absolutely no hope of stopping a volcano erupting.

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More storms, more heat says World Meteorological Organization | Climate News Network

More storms, more heat says World Meteorological Organization | Climate News Network | Natural Disasters | Scoop.it

If you think the world is warming and the weather getting nastier, you’re right, according to the United Nations agency committed to understanding weather and climate.

 

The World Meteorological Organization says the planet “experienced unprecedented high-impact climate extremes” in the ten years from 2001 to 2010, the warmest decade since the start of modern measurements in 1850.

 

Those ten years also continued an extended period of accelerating global warming, with more national temperature records reported broken than in any previous decade. Sea levels rose about twice as fast as the trend in the last century.

 

A WMO report, The Global Climate 2001-2010, A Decade of Climate Extremes, analyses global and regional temperatures and precipitation, and extreme weather such as the heat waves in Europe and Russia, Hurricane Katrina in the US, tropical cyclone Nargis in Myanmar, droughts in the Amazon basin, Australia and East Africa, and floods in Pakistan.

 

It says the decade was the warmest for both hemispheres, and for both land and ocean surface temperatures. There was a rapid decline in Arctic sea ice and accelerating loss of net mass from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and from the world’s glaciers.

 

This melting and the thermal expansion of sea water caused global mean sea levels to rise about three millimetres annually, about double the observed 20th century trend of 1.6 mm per year. Global sea level averaged over the decade was about 20 cm higher than in 1880, the report says.

 

Global-average atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide rose to 389 parts per million in 2010, 39% higher than at the start of the industrial era in 1750. Methane rose to 1,808.0 parts per billion (158%) and nitrous oxide to 323.2 ppb (20%).

 

The WMO secretary-general, Michel Jarraud, said: “A decade is the minimum possible timeframe for meaningful assessments of climate change.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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