Natural, Built and Heritage Features in the Immediate Environment and in Other Areas.
112 views | +0 today
Follow
Natural, Built and Heritage Features in the Immediate Environment and in Other Areas.
ENS1.5 Compares and contrasts natural and built features in their local area and the ways in which people interact with these. ENS1.6 Demonstrates an understanding of the relationship between environments and people.
Curated by Laura El Azzi
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Laura El Azzi
Scoop.it!

Stage 1 teaching resources

Stage 1 teaching resources | Natural, Built and Heritage Features in the Immediate Environment and in Other Areas. | Scoop.it
Laura El Azzi's insight:

This site contains a specific curriculum linked student resource titled ‘Where the Sun Rises’ and is accompanied with a teacher’s copy so that activities can be related to direct outcomes and subject matter in the HSIE syllabus. The PDF file was unable to be scooped, but it and many other resources relating to global perspectives may be found on the site.

 

The student copy of ‘Where the Sun Rises’ is an image booklet focusing on Japanese culture, paying significant attention to how this culture is a product of its environment,  allowing students to gain a global perspective and compare their local environment to a place relatively close to Australia.

 

It discusses the typical Japanese diet of fish and rice due to the abundance of water and how this affects agriculture, providing images of rice paddy fields that are labelled and linked to questions.

 

Some children in Stage One may be able to read these questions and those who are at more of a developmental level may attempt to link the images to words to help themselves along. However, the captions are not crucial to gaining an understanding of the content making this resource very flexible and compliant with ideas of Universal Design for Learning (Spooner et al., 2007) that advocates a built in rather than built on approach insisting the flexibility of one resource is more effective than many resources to cater to different learning needs.

 

Furthermore, if the teacher would like to segue way into mathematics, the scaled map of Japan could be linked to numeracy and measurement in the Mathematics syllabus.

 

Spooner, F., Baker, J., Harris, A., Ahlgrim-Delzell, L., & Browder, D. (2007). Effects of training in universal design for learning on lesson plan development. Remedial and Special Education, 28, 108-116.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura El Azzi
Scoop.it!

Dreamtime Stories - Tiddalick The Frog

Dreamtime Story Animation "Tiddalick The Frog" for the Marambul Yuganha Exhibition at the Griffith campus of TAFE NSW Riverina Institute 2011. Exhibition Coo...
Laura El Azzi's insight:

This Aboriginal Dreamtime Story comes to life for children as a short animation online with oral narration making it a great way to utilise technology in the classroom. The fact that the narration is oral is also very appropriate since that is traditionally how Aboriginal moral lessons and history are told, allowing the resource to resonate particularly well with Indigenous students in the classroom. This demonstrates Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (Mishra and Koehler, 2006, p.1028) on behalf of the teacher since they are relating technological understanding to theories of learning in a way that fulfils syllabus outcomes in an inclusive manner.

 

The story can be used to demonstrate how Indigenous people dealt with and explained their natural surroundings and occurrences as opposed to the way that is traditionally taught in schools. Moreover, the thematic concerns of flood and drought situates itself nicely into issues of ecological sustainability and if a teacher is working with a school that is built on an area of particular Indigenous significance such as Darlington Public School, this can be related to a narrow scale of immediate environment and how it has been explained through time.

 

Ideas for assessment tasks relating to this animation include asking the children to ‘research’ another Dreamtime story relating to environmental changes to initiate them into the process of historical inquiry asking speculative questions of how drought was dealt with in the past and how it is dealt with now can also be asked. They may also present different Dreamtime stories through role play.

 

On another note, since the story of flood and drought is represented by a frog drinking water, literary aspects of representation and symbolism can be explained simplistically to Stage One children by asking them whether they think the story is factual.

 

 

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record Volume 108, Number 6, pp. 1017-1054

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura El Azzi
Scoop.it!

Google Image Result for http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2006/03/11/sydneysmog_wideweb__470x286,0.jpg

Google Image Result for http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2006/03/11/sydneysmog_wideweb__470x286,0.jpg | Natural, Built and Heritage Features in the Immediate Environment and in Other Areas. | Scoop.it
Laura El Azzi's insight:

This visual resource can be used to initiate discussion about natural and built features in students’ local environment and other areas regarding our current relationship with the land, resources and the results of this relationship, fulfilling outcomes ENS1.5 and ENS 1.6.

 

The fact that there is clear evidence of smog and pollution in the image shows a relationship based on exploitation of the land, which can be contrasted with the relationship that Indigenous Australians had with the land prior to European settlement. When discussing this, the image may be supplemented with the other resources scooped such as the Tiddalick Dreamtime story and ‘Where the Sun Rises' to show that there are many ways the land can be utilised and considered’.

 

It provides a good starting point, because it is not literarily dependent allowing it to cater to all different stages of learning in Stage One children in a more developmentally inclusive way. Additionally, the fact that the image is of a well-known Australian feature means many will be able to relate to it, making it more culturally inclusive than an obscure area.

 

Points to include in discussion may be how natural features such as water are used for trade and how it influences Australia’s modes of transportation, housing and diversity.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura El Azzi
Scoop.it!

A shared history - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6 Introduction

A shared history - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6 Introduction | Natural, Built and Heritage Features in the Immediate Environment and in Other Areas. | Scoop.it
Laura El Azzi's insight:

This curriculum website is extremely useful to teachers and should be shared because it provides excellent teaching ideas and activities explicitly linked to syllabus outcomes, Aboriginal perspectives and ideas of heritage.

 

One of the ideas it suggests is inviting an Elder to directly share stories and experiences about the land, especially if the school is built on an area that had particular significance to a specific Indigenous group, which is true for schools such as Darlington Public that was mentioned in a previous scoop.

 

Additionally, activity ideas include using Aboriginal terms to label environmental features children see in their immediate environment. Using geographical language such as ‘creek’ in a ‘bilingual’ manner and adopting language aspects of Indigenous culture helps provide a more appropriate framework to examine Indigenous relationships with the land. It is suggested that this may then be used to compile tables for land, air and water animals that have lived in the immediate area throughout time and answering questions about why they are no longer there. For more visual learners, or as a separate task, this could be mapped to fine tune geography skills.

 

While this can be used to overlap subject matter such as ‘Change and Continuity’, it strongly demonstrates how Australia’s heritage is manifested in relationships with the land throughout time.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Laura El Azzi
Scoop.it!

At Your School

At Your School | Natural, Built and Heritage Features in the Immediate Environment and in Other Areas. | Scoop.it
OzGREEN for leadership and learning in Sustainability.
Laura El Azzi's insight:

This website is particularly valuable to teachers because the Oz Green organisation specifically tailors staff development programs and teacher training relating to ecological sustainability.  

 

It is dedicated to providing school and community programs for different age levels that can be conducted at specific schools or off site, which allows teachers to provide first-hand experience to their students either in an immediate or another setting examining natural features and conducting their own tests. In this regard, students will be encouraged to engage in processes of meaningful inquiry and value based skills (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p.2), that are crucial in the study of HSIE, in a collaborative and practical environment.

 

If participating in an immediate setting, children can learn to look at what was once familiar, in another light, which shows them that something can be understood in a multitude of ways benefitting them in the later stages of schooling, especially in areas of History and Society that require understanding in areas of perspective. The children would be encouraged to look at natural features and might relate this to how society may affect certain environments resulting in an absence of certain flora and fauna, which should be used as an opportunity instil a sense of social and environmental responsibility in the children.

 

Lastly, this clearly crosses with science topics that the students may be learning so this is a good activity to integrate subjects in the classroom.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

more...
No comment yet.