Native view
9.5K views | +5 today
Follow
Native view
Native American culture American history and education of same.
Curated by Shawn Wright
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Wisdom of Elders

Wisdom of Elders | Native view | Scoop.it
Shawn Wright's insight:

Many times little is spoken but when the message is heard it is profound wisdom. Truth and Reconciliation is needed.

Trail of Tears Descendant    Shawn Wright

more...
Dell Raphens's curator insight, February 23, 2014 12:12 PM

...and this is that time...

Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Protecting Lakota culture with science, tech, engineering & math | Vaughn Vargas | TEDxRapidCity

Native Americans have been larger absent from the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. University student and Lakota Vaughn Varga
Shawn Wright's insight:
I love seeing what the young will do with the tools available to them. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

After 40 years of litigation, appeals court rules again in tribal boundary lawsuit

After 40 years of litigation, appeals court rules again in tribal boundary lawsuit | Native view | Scoop.it
SALT LAKE CITY -- A federal appeals court expressed frustration at issuing 40 years worth of legal opinions on tribal boundary lawsuits, only to have the cases keep coming back. "We’re beginning to think we have an inkling of Sisyphus’s fate," the court wrote in an opinion issued Tuesday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Government Hospitals Are Failing Native Americans

Government Hospitals Are Failing Native Americans | Native view | Scoop.it
Sens. John Barrasso and John Thune write about the sorry state of the Indian Health Service: Mismanagement at clinics for veterans makes news, but the IHS is just as bad.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

How a Utah county silenced Native American voters — and how Navajos are fighting back

How a Utah county silenced Native American voters — and how Navajos are fighting back | Native view | Scoop.it
A series of lawsuits could help counteract decades of racist practices.
Shawn Wright's insight:
A little insight into Americas racial hatred of her first peoples.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Why so many Americans think they're part Cherokee

Why so many Americans think they're part Cherokee | Native view | Scoop.it
Many Americans think they have Cherokee blood, and that it makes them more American, but in most cases, they are wrong.
Shawn Wright's insight:
As good an explanation as I can fathom.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

An Exhaustive Photo Series of Native American Life

An Exhaustive Photo Series of Native American Life | Native view | Scoop.it
Edward Curtis traveled America documenting traditional Native American life, although his work provides a very subjective view.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

ContinueOn! The struggle for Truth!

ContinueOn!    The struggle for Truth! | Native view | Scoop.it
Native Americans Misrepresented in the History Books I became angry to learn that the history I was taught in schools were just shaded bits of truth to actual false fabrications of a propaganda
Shawn Wright's insight:
Www.continueOn.us
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

ContinueOn.US

ContinueOn.US | Native view | Scoop.it
Shawn : I was born in 63 about 20 miles from the "Indian" land my mixed blood Cherokee family was "given" in the late 1800's. Shortly after birth my family moved away from the Cherokee Nation and the...
Shawn Wright's insight:

My Thanksgiving story is one of hope put into action. For as long as there has been corporate education in America it has taught mistruth or even erased ugly histories from American minds. Even this day celebrated as a peaceful day between Native Americans and Settlers is a made up fairy tell that is still taught to indoctrinate (if indoctrinate seems too harsh for you, hide the truth from) young and fragile minds. Today I announce the formal Launch of www.ContinueOn.us ContinueOn.US is the public face of a group I helped and support called "ContinueOn!" Dedicated to having the truth taught to all Americans. Read about what has already been accomplished. Lend your hand and help us spread this help us teach truth!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

The End of Continuing On

The End of Continuing On | Native view | Scoop.it

  In 2014, a group of Native Americans in Juneau, Alaska, began an historical event that culminated with the discontinuance and destruction of the historical fiction book, Continuing On.

Shawn Wright's insight:

A First as far as I know for Native America- A false history is repealed and withdrawn by Publisher McGraw-Hill. This is encouraging for all Native America - "The beginning of truth the beginning of our story!"

For over 150 years this truth has been suppressed or striped from educational materials in an effort to cover up and gloss over the worlds largest and oldest on going Genocide - that of the Native American.  Yes this past is shameful but it must be told and taught for if it is forgotten we will have gained nothing from the immeasurable cost of it.

 

There are many more inaccurate stories in regards to Native American history, including the behavior of Columbus, the story of Thanksgiving, the story behind the term redskin. 

 

"We must all be responsible to teach and to have the truth taught for the benefit of the seventh generation"

 

Momentum is growing for a grass roots organization dubbed 

ContinueOn!  led by the three for the purpose of taking on inaccurate and offensive educational materials circulating today.
"As 95% of Native children are taught in a public school setting this is vital and long over due work" said Wright.

 

Currently the group is organizing and establishing a web presence, with an expected launch date of October 12th, 2015.

 

If interested in helping please contact:

Shawn Wright Yonashawn@gmail.com

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Shawn Wright from Indigenous Sovereignty
Scoop.it!

The Native American Genocide and the Teaching of US History

The Native American Genocide and the Teaching of US History | Native view | Scoop.it
In many US classrooms, the United States is left out of the list of countries where genocide has occurred.

Via Jacqueline Keeler
Shawn Wright's insight:

"American exceptionalism is a particular political cultural ideology [that's] been used to construct a particular type of nationalism or a particular type of US identity....  American exceptionalism [was a concept specifically] ... constructed to justify anti-Indian policies, particularly during the 19th century."

At the start of public education 100-150 years ago these “themes” were established and set into place recorded into lesson plans and circular that continue to be taught with little revision to this day.

"American exceptionalism is an ideological position. There are very important reasons that have given rise to it and fueled it over the years. But it's not something that's grounded in historic fact or reality," "It's an ideological position of settlers in a settler colonial society where the foundation of the nation rests on dispossessing Native peoples of their lands." Tsianina Lomawaima of the Mvskoke (Creek) Nation.

 

Michael Yellow Bird of the Arikara and Hidatsa Nation, a professor of sociology and director of indigenous tribal studies at North Dakota State University, said, "In my estimation, most American students receive what has been called an authoritarian education that celebrates a master narrative of this nation and really focuses on what appears to be its greatest accomplishment, the idea of American exceptionalism, the idea that America has done all these great things and sort of occupies a special place on the planet among all countries."

 

“The master narrative of which Yellow Bird speaks has not served any of us - Native Americans or immigrant Americans and their descendants - well. It is a skewed history that high school students are encouraged to accept without critical appraisal, as if they were young children. It does not and cannot create a well-educated citizenry equipped to solve the problems we face, nor does it, as some critics of the AP US history curriculum insist, create a patriotic citizenry, unless we define patriotism as thoughtless acquiescence to those who govern.”

 

"It's going to be very difficult for this country to live up to its democratic ideas of respect for diversity, justice and equality, and taking responsibility unless its people have a really clear and full view of the interactions between indigenous people, Native American people, and the American settler government and settler population," Yellow Bird said.

“It’s impossible to move past these wounds until they are examined understood and redressed”. – Shawn Wright.

more...
Jacqueline Keeler's curator insight, April 5, 2015 7:38 PM

When the term "genocide" is uttered in mainstream school environments, it usually refers to the Jewish Holocaust, or to other genocides committed in the 20th century: Turkey, Stalin's Russia, Nanking, Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia-Herzegovina. But in many US classrooms, the United States is left out of the list of countries where genocide has occurred. And so, when the College Board decided in 2012 (1) that high school students taking Advanced Placement US history should learn about the American Indian genocide - and other events in our history that do not support the notion that ours is a country where peace, justice and the so-called "American way" have always prevailed - the uproar could be heard from Texas to Georgia, and Colorado to North Carolina.

Rescooped by Shawn Wright from Indigenous Sovereignty
Scoop.it!

Cherokees give more than $4 million in car tag revenue to area schools

Cherokees give more than $4 million in car tag revenue to area schools | Native view | Scoop.it
Cherokee Nation officials handed out more than $4 million in car-tag revenue funds to area school districts Friday as part of its annual Public School Appreciation Day at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

Via Jacqueline Keeler
Shawn Wright's insight:

As a Cherokee citizen I support this gift of tribal resources to public schools in and around Cherokee Nations boundaries. It is given with no strings. I have com to question if this "no strings" approach is in our best interest however. 95% of Native children attend public schools yet the social studies and history taught in public education even within the boundaries of Cherokee Nation is devoid of Native America and their experiences within America.  I believe a string called truth needs to be attached to the grant of these funds. These funds could be the start, the draw for public education to include Native perspective and content into its curriculum that it taught to our children. I'm not speaking of traditions and culture those things are the tribes to teach. But I am addressing the genocidal void in history's teaching or the social studies lack of Native American materials here in the heartland of Indian Territory. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Manifesting Destiny - How Long! Will The Handcuff Remain

Manifesting Destiny - How Long! Will The Handcuff Remain | Native view | Scoop.it

“The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those that speak it” George Orwell.

Shawn Wright's insight:

Manifesting Destiny

 

A most revealing and to me riveting study was recently published By Sarah B. Shear Ph.D. the likes of which have long been known but remained unproved with scientific validity over the last 500 years.

Feb. 19th, 2015 is a day that ends this voids silence forever more!

 

The research conducted was a mixed methods content analysis of the nation’s K–12 U.S. and state history standards. The study reveals that that Indigenous Peoples were “largely confined within a pre-1900 context devoid of any significant voice. The narrative presented in U.S. history standards, when analyzed with a critical eye, directed students to see Indigenous Peoples as a long since forgotten episode in the country’s development. The state standards spoke about Indigenous peoples’ experiences in broad terms and were often blended within discussions of Euro-American destiny.” There has been found a “Continued prevalence and persistence of a Eurocentric master narrative in our textbooks and standards.” “When one looks at the larger picture painted by the quantitative data, it is easy to argue that the narrative of U.S. history is painfully one sided” “Indigenous Peoples are excluded from the American story. California history textbooks fail to include critical content related to the kidnapping, rape, murder, and enslavement of Indigenous Peoples throughout California during the Gold Rush era. Instead, one of the texts focused “heavily on the mythology of the era and the thrilling life of American pioneers moving West”. Yet another text, reviewers concluded, could lead elementary students to perceive the Indigenous Peoples as being the cause of “their own demise by attacking miners”. By and large, the California texts failed to adequately address the well-documented genocide of Indigenous Peoples in the state (Trafzer & Lorimer, 2014). While this notion of an American narrative devoid of minority voices is not new, it is ever the more evident now that every state has been examined for such a story. “

 

Why should I invest effort to broadcast these results so they are widely known much less care enough to invest as much personal resource as is possible to change this? I could say because it’s morally the right thing to do but this to me is a bit more personal as well the effects have materialistic components that cannot be denied.  Let’s discuss what’s in it for you and me. Red, yellow, black or blue does not matter as racial tension within the United States of America is being taught to the children of this country cloaked in secret subliminal messaging. 

 

The study of elementary and middle school social studies textbooks found “they failed to adequately address the long-lasting impact of institutionalized racism” and conclude “what students learn, and fail to learn, will impact the sociocultural knowledge base they will develop about the role race and racial equality played, and continue to play, in the United States”.

 

Continue to play…. There is the whole issue, that’s the ominous kicker. If we continue in the same fashion we will produce the same results. History repeats like a mathematics equation yielding the same result. 2+2 yields the same today as it did yesterday - the only way to change the result is to vary the input.

 

Textbooks in use present Indigenous Peoples in negative ways. For example, the study found that Nebraska social studies textbooks told a narrative of history devoid of historical and cultural accuracy and presented Indigenous Peoples as thieves, drunks, bloodthirsty savages, and lazy.
Schools are (still) being used in a CultureCide against me oppressing my children and grandchildren distorting the view and opinion of society and tomorrow’s leaders. Stop it now and we have 50 or so years to wait for these effects to diminish from the societal norm!

 

These dynamics of oppression have been rendered invisible to the main stream for far too long, however painfully visible they are to others. The work of decolonizing education must begin here and now.  We all must engage in the lifelong task of unlearning these things and break their hold over us and more importantly their grasp on the future of our children. 

 

The studies qualitative findings “illuminate a Euro-American narrative that reinstitutes the marginalization of Indigenous cultures and knowledge. Indigenous Peoples are left in the shadows of Euro-America’s destiny, while the cooperation and conflict model provides justification for the eventual termination of Indigenous Peoples from the American landscape and historical narrative.” “Finally, a tone of detachment, especially with long lists of legal and political terms, dismisses the humanity of Indigenous cultures and experiences in the United States.”

 

The purpose of the study was to “investigate the frequency of and kinds of Indigenous Peoples-related content in K–12 U.S. history standards.” And the conclusions the authors reach is that “students are denied opportunities to unpack re/presentations of Indigenous histories, cultures, and current issues within the current standardized curriculum. The authors hope is that by understanding the ways in which state-level standards include—or exclude—Indigenous histories, cultures, and current issues in U.S. history, the implications of standardized curriculum for social studies can begin to form a critical dialogue around these issues .  I applaud their efforts and I pledge effort to spreading their message investing time sounding alarm on this invisibly cloaked emergency.

 

Questions and debates encircling who has the power to determine specific content and context will continue. As the authors point to, “Silences are repressive. Working against the silences involves informing ourselves” and “We must, as …[a people]… seek to end these silences of Indigenous histories occurring across state standards”.

 

Past studies have shown, the creation and modification of state-level standards are made first and foremost by political appointees though they tend to promote a singular narrative of American history politics can and has been used recently for change. For example, Montana’s constitutional amendment, “Indian Education for All,” which calls for “quality Indian education for all content” areas, would be a unique case study to see how classroom teachers teach this constitutional mandate along with or against the state social studies standards (Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2014).

 

Indigenous Peoples did not receive citizen status in the United States until 1924, and their ability to vote was not fully granted until the 1960s, Though Native Americans were the first peoples of this nation we were the last people group allowed to take part in the formation of the nation’s governing body. Indigenous Peoples are seen as relics of a distant past, void of a voice in modern America. Brayboy commented “the everyday experiences of American Indians, the Indigenous inhabitants of the Americas, have essentially been removed from the awareness of dominant members of U.S. society”.

 

More often than not, Eurocentric narratives subsumed the implications of westward expansion on Indigenous Peoples within a larger narrative of Manifest Destiny, thus lending justification to American actions and minimizing the human costs of such policies. To manifest its destiny of expanding west, the U.S. government had to deal with its “great problem” Indigenous Peoples. With regard to the impact of westward expansion on Indigenous Peoples, few states included standards related to issues of genocide. In fact, the use of the word genocide in relation to the experiences of Indigenous Peoples in U.S. history was found only in one state—Washington. Despite the activist efforts of Indigenous Peoples, very few states included standards related to Indigenous civil rights actions in the teaching of modern America. American history works to negate the complexities of our history, legitimizes the destiny of White America, and relegates Indigenous Peoples to roles as insiders or outsiders depending on the context of the Euro-American timeline.

 

“The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those that speak it” George Orwell.

 

Manifesting Destiny: Re/presentations of Indigenous Peoples in K–12 U.S. History Standards Sarah B. Shear, Ryan T. Knowles, Gregory J. Soden & Antonio J. Castro The Pennsylvania State University–Altoona University of Missouri

 

Published online: 19 Feb 2015.  http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00933104.2014.999849

 

SARAH B. SHEAR is an Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education at The Pennsylvania State University–Altoona, Altoona, PA 16601. RYAN T. KNOWLES is a Doctoral Candidate of Social Studies Education at the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.  GREGORY J. SODEN is a teacher of English, Philosophy, and World Religions at Muriel Williams Battle High School, Columbia, MO 65202. ANTONIO J. CASTRO is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Learning, Teaching and Curriculum at the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

What Amy Goodman’s Arrest Warrant Means for the Dakota Access Pipeline and Free Speech

What Amy Goodman’s Arrest Warrant Means for the Dakota Access Pipeline and Free Speech | Native view | Scoop.it
The arrest warrant for Amy Goodman sets an alarming precedent that cannot be ignored.
Shawn Wright's insight:
Amy Goodman is a hero to be celebrated and not a criminal to be targeted. The ND Governor and Attorney General have made a mockery of civil liberty and justice in their state and this is plain for all to see. So plain even the US government was awoke from its slumber to add weight to the unbalanced scale of justice. The problem as it always seems to be is that good judgment is blinded by big money, contributions both public and private to fuel greed in the hearts of otherwise fair men. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Anger Simmers in Charlotte as 2 Narratives of Police Shooting Take Hold

Anger Simmers in Charlotte as 2 Narratives of Police Shooting Take Hold | Native view | Scoop.it
The city braced for more unrest after the police said they had found a gun that a black man was said to have brandished in front of officers, contradicting accounts from the man’s family.
Shawn Wright's insight:

This post is of a tragic nature, I have not seen video footage of this killing its not yet available but I have seen the footage for the Tulsa killing the article mentions. I agree in both cases the "suspects" did not follow police commands. But is execution a correct response?  I missed that part in the Bill of Rights that said not obeying authority was one of the few capital offences in the land of freedom. In fact I always thought that a capital "death" punishment came after a jury of 12 peers had recommended a death sentence and not for disobeying a cop or perhaps being deft or mentally confused or a host of other reasons I could theorize.

          My son and I have discussed what I call Color Killing on several occasions as statically Native American's are far more likely to be killed at a traffic stop than any other race. My son Cody Ryan Wrights thought merit further discussion, a wide and deep discussion so I hope to begin that discussion today.

           Cody Ryan Wright Round Rock Texas wrote:

 "I wish people would recognize a larger part of the problem is unbridled police power. Absolutely racism and prejudice are key factors, but that is only an accessory to the danger which is unlimited authority with zero accountability. Without power racists are confined to words. No person should be constantly trained to unrealistically fear for their lives and then be given a gun and set loose in highly stressful situations such law enforcement and then given an omnipotent hall pass for any action they may take. Immediate reform should include... Reign in rules of engagement (Our men and women fighting in wars against foreign enemies have much more strict ROE's) Disarm neighborhood patrols (focus training on deescalating conflict and emergency first response and used as such rather than propagating the "Police as Crimefighters" myth and reinforcing their fear), because I believe most racism is born from fear and inferiority. Create independent review boards. (Police hide behind a very real thin blue line of silence that has entrenched itself in gang like fashion so that even the "Good Cops" wouldn't dare speak out against a fellow officer regardless of circumstance, and this extends to the DA and internal investigations.) Unifying behind a call for major police reform, that's how we save lives."


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Native Americans bring oil pipeline fight to Washington

Native Americans bring oil pipeline fight to Washington | Native view | Scoop.it
Members of the Sioux nation came to the nation's capital to fight a $3.8B pipeline project.
Shawn Wright's insight:
They have never asked for much. Just to live in peace on their own land in their own way. But even in 2016 the nation sees profit in the scraps of land left to them.

Will we as Americans ever do what is moral, just, and honorable toward Native America?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

On the Shameful and Skewed ‘Redskins’ Poll

On the Shameful and Skewed ‘Redskins’ Poll | Native view | Scoop.it
Last Thursday, The Washington Post published a poll on its front page that found that 90 percent of “Native Americans” were “not bothered” by the dictionary-defined ethnic slur “Redskins,” sending shock waves through the sports world and Indian Country.
Shawn Wright's insight:
It has been said stats don't lie but this piece shows liars can slant and stack the stats.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Cherokee Nation chief tells ‘racist’ Trump to stop calling Elizabeth Warren ‘Pocahontas’

Cherokee Nation chief tells ‘racist’ Trump to stop calling Elizabeth Warren ‘Pocahontas’ | Native view | Scoop.it
Cherokee Nation chief tells ‘racist’ Trump to stop calling Elizabeth Warren ‘Pochahontas’ https://t.co/POz6YtSv1b
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

10 Horrific Native American Massacres - Listverse

10 Horrific Native American Massacres - Listverse | Native view | Scoop.it
The first 100 years or so of the United States' existence was filled with travesties like the Civil War and the enormous slave trade which flourished in th
Shawn Wright's insight:
I will add another the Trail of Tears" forced march event that exterminated 1/4 to 1/3 of the Cherokee population.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Mona Island caves shed light on dialogue between Europeans and Native Americans | PerfScience

Mona Island caves shed light on dialogue between Europeans and Native Americans | PerfScience | Native view | Scoop.it
Archaeologists have discovered evidence as to how the first generations of Europeans in the Americas have mingled with indigenous population.
Shawn Wright's insight:
The more that is learned about Chris Columbus the more one must question the practice of America celebrating a genocidal pedophilia that never stepped foot onto Americans main land soil - thank God!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Most Students Have No Clue What Accurate Native American History Looks Like

Most Students Have No Clue What Accurate Native American History Looks Like | Native view | Scoop.it
"They're re-learning history. When we talk about Thanksgiving -- they're wrestling with these stories that they grew up with."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Native American art exhibition, 'Return from Exile,' starts two-year tour in ... - UGA Today

Native American art exhibition, 'Return from Exile,' starts two-year tour in ... - UGA Today | Native view | Scoop.it
For the last 500 years, and particularly since they began to be displaced and removed from their ancestral homelands, Native American tribes of what is now the Southeastern U.S.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

Trail of Tears Genocide descendants honored - McGraw Hill destroys false education material

Trail of Tears Genocide descendants honored - McGraw Hill destroys false education material | Native view | Scoop.it

In 2014, a group of Native Americans in Juneau, Alaska, began an historical event that culminated with the discontinuance and destruction of the book, Continuing On, a purported  historical fiction about the Trail of Tears.   It was the book, The Visit, a story of parents visiting their native child in a boarding school, that drew the attention of people in Juneau.  Parents and community members knew that what was depicted in the story was nothing like their families’ experiences.  It disturbed them that their children and grandchildren would read about

Shawn Wright's insight:

 The Cherokee Nation also took exception to Continuing On because of factual inaccuracies concerning The Trail of Tears.  The cover illustration depicted clothing never worn by the Cherokee as well as lodging that was not consistent with the time period.  Oklahoma was not a state until 1907, but the book makes several references to the Cherokee being relocated to Oklahoma in the 1830’s.   However, it was the depicted relationship between the child in the story and soldiers that offended the Cherokee people the most.  The story showed the soldiers caring for the child, but the reality was quite different. 

 

Through Linked In, three people were drawn together from Oklahoma, Maine, and Massachusetts in late April: Shawn Wright, a descendant of a survivor of the Trail of Tears, Kathy Pollard, of Cherokee descent, and Susan Gale, who simply honors the ways of The People.  After reading a LinkedIn post by Wright about the McGraw-Hill book Continuing On, Pollard called the publisher to find out if this reader was still in publication. 

 

The final acts of this story began to unfold, drawing upon the foundation begun in both Alaska and the Cherokee Nation. 

 Through the exchange of several letters, Dr. Shawn Mahoney, the Chief Academic Advisor for McGraw-Hill responded with the following well-received news: 

 

“Specifically our intent is to stop shipment of these materials effective this month, and to destroy the existing inventory.”

 Mahoney went on to write:  “…we are taking active steps to widen the panel of external reviewers to include experts who specialize in Native American history and Native American themes in literature.”

 

There are many more inaccurate stories in regards to Native American history, including the behavior of Columbus, the story of Thanksgiving, the story behind the term redskin. 

 

"We must all be responsible to teach and to have the truth taught for the benefit of the seventh generation"

 

Momentum is growing for a grass roots organization dubbed

ContinueOn! led by the three for the purpose of taking on inaccurate and offensive educational materials circulating today.
"As 95% of Native children are taught in a public school setting this is vital and long over due work" said Wright.

 

Currently the group is organizing and establishing a web presence, with an expected launch date of October 12th, 2015.

 

If interested in helping please contact:

Shawn Wright Yonashawn@gmail.com

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

What if….

What if…. | Native view | Scoop.it

What if we were to follow the way of our fathers the way of the Chickadee???What if Native America came together acting as one people for the betterment of their own as well as all other Native American peoples?What if there was a fundamental shift away from the old social policies and framework in which the Bureau of Indian affairs has been conducted, to a more comprehensive and inclusive “Empowerment” agenda that recognizes Native Americas right to live free and providing the tools of self-determination that allow them to do so?

Shawn Wright's insight:

Empowerment, in in such context has two aspects. It means First Nations people empowering ourselves by taking all appropriate and necessary control, powers and responsibilities for our own lives and futures. It also means Federal, State, and Local governments sharing, and in many cases relinquishing, powers and responsibilities, and supporting Indigenous people with resources and capability building.

What if this was reality rather than dream? Where is our great leadership of days past why have they become so quiet today when they are needed most?

Perhaps we have forgotten the words of our elders or we need to be reminded that such unity is still possible.

"I am a red man. If the Great Spirit had desired me to be a white man he would have made me so in the first place. He put in your heart certain wishes and plans, in my heart he put other and different desires. Each man is good in his sight. It is not necessary for Eagles to be Crows." - Sitting Bull, Hunkpapa Sioux

"Many proposals have been made to us to adopt your laws, your religion, your manners and your customs. We would be better pleased with beholding the good effects of these doctrines in your own practices, than with hearing you talk about them". -Old Tassel, Chief of the Tsalagi (Cherokee)

"Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world. A world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations. A world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again. In that day, there will be those among the Lakota who will carry knowledge and understanding of unity among all living things and the young white ones will come to those of my people and ask for this wisdom. I salute the light within your eyes where the whole Universe dwells. For when you are at that center within you and I am that place within me, we shall be one." - Crazy Horse, Oglala Sioux Chief (This statement was taken from Crazy Horse as he sat smoking the Sacred Pipe with Sitting Bull for the last time, four days before he was assassinated.)

“They told me it was a bank and that the white men place their money there to be taken care of, and that by and by they got it back with interest. We are Indians and we have no such bank; but when we have plenty of money or blankets, we give them away to other chiefs and people, and by and by they return them with interest, and our hearts feel good" - Chief Maquinna, Nootka

"I believe it is in the power of the Indians unassisted, but united and determined, to hold their country. We cannot expect to do this without serious losses and many privations, but we possess the spirit of our fathers, and are resolved” - Stand Waitie, Tsalagi (Cherokee) Last Confederate General to surrender.

"If you talk to the animals they will talk with you and you will know each other. If you do not talk to them you will not know them and what you do not know, you will fear. What one fears, one destroys." - Chief Dan George, Tsleil-Waututh Nation, British Columbia, Canada

"We learned to be patient observers like the owl. We learned cleverness from the crow, and courage from the jay, who will attack an owl ten times its size to drive it off its territory. But above all of them ranked the chickadee because of its indomitable spirit." - Tom Brown, Jr. a student of Stalking Wolf, Apache elder and medicine man.

I hear these voices and see such a model within our brothers the Indigenous peoples of Australia and I wonder - what if Native America was to do the same? What if we came together in this same way?

"A very great vision is needed and the man who has it must follow it as the eagle seeks the deepest blue of the sky.” - Crazy Horse, Sioux Chief

"Whenever the white man treats the Indian as they treat each other, then we will have no more wars. We shall all be alike--brothers of one father and one another, with one sky above us and one country around us, and one government for all.” - Chief Joseph, Nez Perce

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=qhfQh4wBUO0

http://empoweredcommunities.org.au/f.ashx/EC-Report.pdf

http://empoweredcommunities.org.au

“The principle of subsidiarity—that authority to decide and act should rest at the closest level possible to the people or organizations the decision or action is designed to serve—is an important element in our concept of Indigenous Empowerment. Together with Indigenous self-determination and the mutual rights and responsibilities shared between Indigenous people and governments, it is at the heart of our Indigenous Empowerment reforms.”

“Our Indigenous Empowerment framework is based on the premise that Indigenous Australians have a right to development, which includes our economic, social and cultural development as families, individuals and communities and as Indigenous peoples. It recognizes the primacy of the local nature of peoples and places, and is aimed at the empowerment of the families and individuals connected to those peoples and places. We recommend national and regional institutions only to support an enabling framework for place-based development agendas. There are two parts to our development goal. They are each of equal importance, and are to be pursued concurrently and constantly tested to determine whether we are most productively using available resources and opportunities.”

“First, our goal is to close the gap on the social and economic disadvantage of the Indigenous Australians of the Empowered Communities regions.”

“Second, we aim to enable the cultural recognition and determination of Indigenous Australians of the Empowered Communities regions so that we can preserve, maintain, renew and adapt our cultural and linguistic heritage and transmit our heritage to future generations.”

What if???

ᏲᏅ - ᏣᎳᎩ - ᏩᏙ Shawn - of the Cherokee people - Thank you.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

The Future Path of a Worthy Walk

The Future Path of a Worthy Walk | Native view | Scoop.it
For me there are some additional and concluding thoughts to at least the generalized thinking so far in this series of writings. Let’s review a few things first:Understand and change – First is to understand the “Who” we are fighting, “Who “they” are, is important to note. They are in my opinion the politically active thought shapers, those who spin truth for advantage. They do this for one of two reasons control/power and greed/money. This motive has not changed in the last 500 years it’s the same force today as it was then” for a complet
more...
Richard Hayes's curator insight, April 1, 2015 6:46 PM

It is a shame that the political policies continue in this time and day, People cry rasism but do they truly know what racism is, just ask a Native American they will show you what racism really is.

Scooped by Shawn Wright
Scoop.it!

9 Works by Indigenous Writers That Should Be Taught in Every High School

9 Works by Indigenous Writers That Should Be Taught in Every High School | Native view | Scoop.it
These works aren't on most required reading lists, but they certainly should be.
Shawn Wright's insight:
Native experiences should be best told by those who are. Such is the case here.
more...
No comment yet.