National Electronic Health Records
5 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Nardy Bruls from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Coming soon: EMRs that respond to voice commands and supply answers

Coming soon: EMRs that respond to voice commands and supply answers | National Electronic Health Records | Scoop.it

Improvements in healthcare systems rely on electronic data entered by doctors into intelligent devices and analytical systems. But many doctors hate the laborious process of typing and fussing with computers. Apple’s Siri, a voice command module for the iPhone, points the way to easier approaches in the future – and many technology companies are helping to lead this charge. Nuance Healthcare, maker of Dragon Medical 360 and other speech recognition and clinical language understanding products, is working with American and Canadian EMR vendors to make talking to EMRs a reality.

 

The concept of speaking commands to intelligent devices that analyze, react, and respond verbally goes by many names, says Jonathon Dreyer (pictured), director of mobile solutions marketing at Nuance Healthcare. “We lump all those concepts under the label of ‘intelligent voice interactions’.”

 

Nuance recently released a new version of its cloud-based speech engine – part of the company’s 360 Development Platform – and is allowing EMR developers to incorporate it in their product development, says Dreyer.

 

“Dozens of developers have already integrated our speech and understanding engines in their applications and their solutions are available in the market now. We have more than 250 developers in our program so we’ll continue to see a steady stream of new apps hit the market, and existing products evolve, as the integration of new capabilities starts to take shape over the next 12 to18 months.”

 

What will those capabilities look like, or rather, sound like? In current systems, physicians have to type a multitude of terms for even basic searches, and troll through mountains of information to find what they want. Instead, they could simply speak their questions – a verbal Google search – and the system will return those results on-screen, with further verbal commands to refine them.

 

For example, a physician may ask the system, “What’s the treatment for Lyme disease?” or “What are the common drug interactions between medication A and B?”

 


Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nardy Bruls from Electronic Healthcare Records (EHR)
Scoop.it!

A Survey of Primary Care Doctors in Ten Countries Shows Progress in Use of Health Information Technology, Less in Other Areas - The Commonwealth Fund

A Survey of Primary Care Doctors in Ten Countries Shows Progress in Use of Health Information Technology, Less in Other Areas - The Commonwealth Fund | National Electronic Health Records | Scoop.it
More than two-thirds of U.S. primary care physicians were using electronic medical records in 2012, a substantial increase from 2009, when less than half had adopted the technology, a new Commonwealth Fund survey finds.

Via Spence Morley
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nardy Bruls from Electronic Healthcare Records (EHR)
Scoop.it!

A Survey of Primary Care Doctors in Ten Countries Shows Progress in Use of Health Information Technology, Less in Other Areas - The Commonwealth Fund

A Survey of Primary Care Doctors in Ten Countries Shows Progress in Use of Health Information Technology, Less in Other Areas - The Commonwealth Fund | National Electronic Health Records | Scoop.it
More than two-thirds of U.S. primary care physicians were using electronic medical records in 2012, a substantial increase from 2009, when less than half had adopted the technology, a new Commonwealth Fund survey finds.

Via Spence Morley
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nardy Bruls from Science News
Scoop.it!

The Cooperation Instinct

The Cooperation Instinct | National Electronic Health Records | Scoop.it

In a dog-eat-dog world, people still cooperate, collaborate, and help each other out. Our species’ urge to work together has remained an evolutionary paradox, seemingly at odds with Darwinian theory—until now.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
Harry Madigan's curator insight, October 3, 2014 9:56 PM

It was refreshing to see some optimism in this piece :). I had been trudging through so many negative articles about uncredible and unauthentic pieces, however finding this reinforced my faith. 

 

This article explores the notion of collaboration and cooperation being a characteristic of human nature. 

 

I found it difficult to rank this piece below "How to destroy your credibility by sacrificing Authenticity"  as it is extremely informative and inspiring, yet though it is more so based on theory and ideology i feel the former source is more imperative.