Narrative Tech
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Narrative Tech
Tracking the evolution of narrative under the new light of technology.
Curated by RainboWillis
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Ahead of Comic-Con, Madefire brings its motion book tech to IDW, Top Cow, & Boom Studios

Ahead of Comic-Con, Madefire brings its motion book tech to IDW, Top Cow, & Boom Studios | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
Digital comics startup Madefire announced a new publisher partnership that will bring its motion book technology to a handful of independent and licensed comic book series today, including Star Tre...
RainboWillis's insight:

I wonder how innovations in this vein may produce necessary tools for storytelling. 

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How the fabulous creatures of the HBO universe made cinema (almost) unnecessary

How the fabulous creatures of the HBO universe made cinema (almost) unnecessary | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
Television is the new movies, thanks to Sookie, Nucky, Tony, Carrie, Larry, Ari, Tyrion and Selina.
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Digital Beards 5 – The Future of Libraries Part 2 | Digital Beards

Digital Beards 5 – The Future of Libraries Part 2 | Digital Beards | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
RainboWillis's insight:

The latest Digital Beards podcast is up!

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Worthplaying | 'Splinters of Ares' Announced, Melding MMO With Movies

Worthplaying | 'Splinters of Ares' Announced, Melding MMO With Movies | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
With the latest reviews, previews, screenshots, exclusive interviews, and an extensive PC/console game database, WorthPlaying is your premiere daily stop for gaming news.
RainboWillis's insight:

Following Defiance, we have Splinters of Ares.

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The Future of Libraries: Short on Books, Long on Tech | TIME.com

The Future of Libraries: Short on Books, Long on Tech | TIME.com | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
This isn't your childhood library.
RainboWillis's insight:

An article which exaggerates the extremes of the transition in which we find ourselves, but nonetheless uses good examples. Ignore the hyperbole.

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Transmedia Breakdown: Game of Thrones

Transmedia Breakdown: Game of Thrones | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
Challenge what you think you know
RainboWillis's insight:

Apparently this is old, but I hadn't seen it before. A textured, seemingly well thought-out (but at the very least it is well-presented) implementation of transmedia, gamification, badging and collaboration, all resulting in a very successful brand. 


I want to smell Westeros. 

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Digital Beards 4 – The Future of Libraries Part 1 | Digital Beards

Digital Beards 4 – The Future of Libraries Part 1 | Digital Beards | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
RainboWillis's insight:

Sort of an indulgent episode for me, on a subject which I find fascinating.

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The Origin Of Species, Charles Darwin — Evolutionary Edition

A book for both Design & Darwin fans. A unique edition of the evolutionary changes made to one of the most important books ever written
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Once upon a time, storytelling was for free - Bangalore - dna

Once upon a time,  storytelling was for free - Bangalore -  dna | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
Many parents in city are increasingly availing of services of professional storytellers. - Bangalore dna
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The Journal: A Creative Writing Workshop Literary Journal

Click here to edit the title

RainboWillis's insight:

I have the great privilege teaching a Creative Writing workshop at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The students I've worked with have been amazing storytellers, and it has been a privilege reading their work. One of the coolest parts of the job, though, is publishing their work in the class's online literary journal at the end of the semester. 


The students nominate editors part-way through the course, and those editors take it upon themselves to copy-edit the submissions (each student picks his/her best work from the class for their submission; submitting is not a part of their grade or enforced, but is up to them) and write a preface/introduction for their particular issue. 


It was an honor to work with Sarah Carstensen and Leah Denman, the nominated editors from The Workshop's Spring '13 cohort, putting up The Journal. It is no exaggeration to say that the two of them went above and beyond what was asked of them, in producing this great issue. 


I hope everyone who has time will visit it and have a good read. That's why these stories are out there: to be read.

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Demonstrating the Simplicity of Storytelling

Demonstrating the Simplicity of Storytelling | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it

"Once again this shows the power of the mind to create a story to make sense of its surroundings. Your brain is happier to believe there are connections between the things that it sees. This is a vital insight for your brand experience. If you do not control the story, your audience will find their own and maybe it’s not the story you want to tell."


Via Gregg Morris
RainboWillis's insight:

The Kuleshov effect. I didn't know this term, but of course it is true: Context plays a defining role in how we interpret narrative. 


This would be a useful video for my Creative Writing students.

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XYEYE's comment, June 14, 2013 8:03 PM
Context I always say is the other king!
Ariana Amorim's curator insight, June 17, 2013 11:48 AM

This article tells us about the Kuleshov Effect and its implications on brand experience. I think there's more to it and that's why I rescoop it here.

 

The Kuleshov Effect is a film editing (montage) effect demonstrated by Russian filmmaker Lev Kuleshov in the 1910s and 1920s. 

 

In the dawn of the 20th century, cinema was a new art form, comprising many techniques that hadn’t been developed. The elements of editing were among the ones that had not been studied to the needed extension. Lev Kuleshov was among the first to indicate the power of film editing and to dissect the effects of juxtaposition.

 

Kuleshov put a film together, showing the expression of an actor, edited together with a plate of soup, a girl in a coffin and a woman on a recliner. Audiences praised the subtle acting, showing an almost imperceptible expression of hunger, grief, or lust in turn. The reality, of course, is that the same clip of the actor's face was re-used, and the effect is created entirely by its juxtaposition with other images.

 

Through his experiments and research, Kuleshov discovered that depending on how shots are assembled the audience will attach a specific meaning or emotion to it.The implication is that viewers brought their own emotional reactions to this sequence of images, and then moreover attributed those reactions to the actor, investing his impassive face with their own feelings.

 

So, can we recognize emotion without context? How do we reframe the stories we tell others and ourselves?

 

The stories that we tell ourselves are powerful. And yet, if you think about it, they are, in fact, just stories. 

 

Once we realize that, it then becomes possible to conclude that we could,  tell ourselves other stories –  stories that make space for our own growth, stories that build us up instead of break us down.

 

(You can read more about the Kuleshov effect here http://io9.com/5960035/can-the-kuleshov-effect-really-control-your-perception-of-other-peoples-feelings)

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The New York Times Told Me to Take This Down

The New York Times Told Me to Take This Down | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
It’s been five months since the New York Times dropped their mammoth digital story “Snow Fall,” and some people still talk about it as if it…
RainboWillis's insight:

Fascinating tension at work here, between technology and digital rights. 


Scrollkit appears to be a very powerful, super cool tool. I'm playing around with it now, and will post more about it when my opinions are more fully formed.

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How interactive technology is transforming storytelling

How interactive technology is transforming storytelling | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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Jeni Mawter's curator insight, July 16, 2013 10:44 PM

With a considerable (and thankful) push from the Gaming industry ...

Sushma Sharma's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:39 AM

Amazing 

Ryan Burwell's curator insight, July 19, 2013 11:42 AM

Video game control, GPS tracking, and a zombie themed storyline combine to create a new way of participating in narrative.

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Games culture should speak for itself

Games culture should speak for itself | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
It's time for video games to take their seat at the cultural and creative table, says GameCity's Iain Simons
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Can’t stop, won’t stop: PRX introduces an app for unending audio storytelling

Can’t stop, won’t stop: PRX introduces an app for unending audio storytelling | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
The new PRX Remix app offers a window into an alternate universe of public media, where podcasts and independent productions enjoy pride of place and serendipity is the organizing principle.
RainboWillis's insight:

As an avid podcast listener, I'm interested to see how this works. Is it different from having Stitcher's "Listener's Also Liked" function kick you in the direction of a fragment you may enjoy? 

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Logo TV Speeds Up The Storytelling Process With Its New Vine-based Soap

Logo TV Speeds Up The Storytelling Process With Its New Vine-based Soap | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
Logo TV produced the entire 22-episode run of its new soap opera The Vines of Sauvignon Blanc at its New York City office in just one day.
RainboWillis's insight:

I wouldn't mind seeing this catch on. 

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The Hyped Future or the Desired Future? — Annoyed Librarian

The Hyped Future or the Desired Future? — Annoyed Librarian | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
RainboWillis's insight:

More snarky than informative, but at the very least attacking in an appropriate direction, the "Hyped Future" may be, more than anything, an attack on those prognosticators who project the inevitable evolution of the library to be an uncomfortable experience for library employees. I've never felt this to be the case, myself, but the Time journalist to whom this article responds speaks repeatedly of "stern" and "shushing" librarians as if they are a primitive species of humanoid being pushed to extinction by progress. To which the "Annoyed Librarian" rebuts: Instead of riding the hype of what people expect libraries to become, let's see what library users want!


Which is, at best, an over-simplification of reality, perhaps rhetorical in nature but more likely not--more likely the "Annoyed Librarian" believes what he or she is saying--in response to a gross generalization. Of course libraries are going to shed their books, or at least organize them in increasingly centralized locations, and of course libraries are going to have to provide services and skill-building and creative spaces in place of the books which were once the primary draw to libraries everywhere. The "Annoyed Librarian's" claim that we can't Google everything is at least equally uninformed compared to the claims of the Time writer that books are over. They are both living in dream worlds. 


The evolution which the Time journalist speaks of is downplayed by the "Annoyed Librarian" because...well, it seems the Time journalist ill-chose examples of contemporary library functions: card catalogs, among others. Which is really naive of the the author, but not to as alarming an extent as you might think. I used a card catalog when I was growing up, not fifteen years ago. How much change do you think will happen in the next fifteen years?


The Annoyed Writer is attacking in the right direction because we can never know what will change and how, or when, and hype certainly does build big around transitions in any field. However, he or she is being obtuse using the Pew research to claim that libraries won't have to change change as much as people say they will. They will change quite a lot, actually. People ages 16-29 go to the library because they have to. I'm not Pew, but I've done a little asking around myself, and the people in that age group who I've asked--high school and college students--are pretty clear on the fact that they're not going to use the library anymore when they don't have to.


The older demographic? They're not the future of libraries.  

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The Works: Storytelling Bicycles tell recycling tale

The Works: Storytelling Bicycles tell recycling tale | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
If Marshall McLuhan’s “the medium is the message” still begs a demonstration, Storytelling Bicycles is it.
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Digital Beards 4 – The Future of Libraries Part 1 | Digital Beards

Digital Beards 4 – The Future of Libraries Part 1 | Digital Beards | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
RainboWillis's insight:

Sort of an indulgent episode for me, on a subject which fascinates me.

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The Noun Project

The Noun Project | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
Creating, Sharing and Celebrating the World's Visual Language.
RainboWillis's insight:

I know I'd heard of The Noun Project before, but I'd never looked into it. Of course, global visual languages aren't super fresh in concept, but in execution this is, at the very least, a clean assortment of universal indicators which I will definitely use in the future.

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Transmedia: A Filmmakers Foe or Ally?

Transmedia: A Filmmakers Foe or Ally? | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it

Julian Cheevers:  "There’s increasingly a lot of talk about Transmedia storytelling; the idea of taking pieces of a story and systematically putting them across different media touch points for the purposes of creating a unified and coordinated entertainment experience. But why is Transmedia storytelling important for independent filmmakers in particular?"


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
RainboWillis's insight:

The best point touched here, IMO: Greater availability of tools demanding more of artists in order to differentiate their work from their peers'. 

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, June 24, 2013 4:12 AM

In a sentence ... "Transmedia has an element of marketing to it at times, but when done well it’s simply good storytelling, an extension of the film experience". Do you agree?

Richard Stadler's curator insight, June 25, 2013 7:18 AM

This could be a subtle shift in content creation. It might work, it might not, but I think test it. It might work for your company/market and not others..

Rob Erickson's curator insight, July 2, 2013 3:49 PM

It's definitely an ally if done the correct way.

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Tapestry Storytelling App Update Brings Quirk Books’ Shakespeare Star Wars Story - AppNewser

Tapestry Storytelling App Update Brings Quirk Books’ Shakespeare Star Wars Story - AppNewser | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
Tapestry Storytelling App Update Brings Quirk Books’ Shakespeare Star Wars Story
RainboWillis's insight:

It occurs to me that parody (though not only parody) is a perfect application of Tapestry's characteristics--especially if that parody is line by line. When I first heard of Tapestry, I thought the app would be best used for poetry, but having tried it out myself I don't like it for poetry very much at all. Most of the poetry I enjoy demands repeated returns to earlier lines, the establishment of new perspectives on foundational themes. I need to bounce around in poetry because, when it is done right, it establishes its own context by which the reader may understand it. Tapestry makes this difficult, because it goes out of its way to isolate certain lines/images from the context of the paragraphs which surround them, encouraging the reader to slowly digest each line on its own.


The context for parody, however, is external to the text. We recognize parody when we read a line or artifact in a book playing off of some cultural trope or meme. The Star Wars Shakespeare mashup is perfect for this.

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Digital Beards 3 – Gender through Comics MOOC w/ Christina Blanch | Digital Beards

Digital Beards 3 – Gender through Comics MOOC w/ Christina Blanch | Digital Beards | Narrative Tech | Scoop.it
RainboWillis's insight:

Latest Digital Beards podcast from us here at eLearning! Spoke with Christina Blanch; great conversation!

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