Storybag
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Storybag
Organizational (or brand) narratives are open ended and kept alive by an ongoing (transmedial) exchange of (experience) stories
Curated by Peter Fruhmann
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A Lesson from the Oscars: Storytelling as a Tool for Healing and Sound Politics

A Lesson from the Oscars: Storytelling as a Tool for Healing and Sound Politics | Storybag | Scoop.it

On Sunday night, “Inocente” won an Oscar for Best Short Documentary Subject. The film is a moving coming-of-age story about an undocumented young woman inCalifornia, Inocente Izucar, who struggles with poverty and homelessness and finds resilience through art. As the trailer appeared on the big screen on the Oscar stage, it became crystal clear how infrequently we hear of the personal stories of undocumented youths or, dare I say it, of the healing power of storytelling. (You can watch the film here.)

 

[Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images]


Via Gregg Morris
Peter Fruhmann's insight:

Initiatives like that should be followed more. Storytelling leads to mutual understanding, compassion and respect.

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What Shape is Your Brand Story?

What Shape is Your Brand Story? | Storybag | Scoop.it

Some people talk about the “arc” of a story. Others talk about “coming full circle” and “forks in the road.” When we think about the emotional ups and downs inherent in a compelling story, our minds quickly form images of physical lines, curves, and other shapes.

 

Marketers and business owners would be wise to familiarize themselves with this infographic. Graphic designer Maya Eilam has given us all a gift by taking the time to beautifully render Kurt Vonnegut’s thinking into an illustrated model of 7 story archetypes.*  (Good-Bad-Good, etc.)  I’m already a big fan of how Vonnegut distills a story down to its essence, and have previously shared this video of him teaching story structures.


Via Gregg Morris
Peter Fruhmann's insight:

I like the drawings and the clear shapes, could be helpful when you want to explain story forms (essences) to impatient managers. Although I think that the arc (the change, the aha-moment and the insight / meaning) is in every story. I wonder, though, about the 'bad to worse' with 'metamorphosis' as example: a caterpillar cocooning (reflection) and becoming a butterfly does not seem such a bad thing, a business tycoon becoming world's greatest well-doer (Bill Gates) either... And talking about Brand Stories: same goes for Organisational Stories, I think. It's all about (and made by) human beings. Stories in every shape relate the human condition in the end, don't they?

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The 5 Levels of Digital Storytelling | Digital Play

The 5 Levels of Digital Storytelling | Digital Play | Storybag | Scoop.it

The 5 Levels of Digital Storytelling

When we think of introducing web-based tools into our classrooms, as teachers we often obsess over the technical side of things. We worry about setting everything up, about dealing with passwords, about computers crashing and our students not doing what they are supposed to do.


Via Hans Heesterbeek
Peter Fruhmann's insight:

Excellent post for all who want to work with digital storytelling on schools and/or adult learners. With an avalanche of resources to tap in!

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Peter Fruhmann's comment, February 8, 2013 4:53 AM
Excellent post on digital storytelling for schools and adult learners with rich resources to tap in.
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Social Media Marketing Funnel

Social Media Marketing Funnel | Storybag | Scoop.it

Via The Fish Firm II
Peter Fruhmann's insight:

Nice model, but it does not explain how you get to the engagement of the new advocates... My guess: Storytelling AND story listening, an insopiring and inspired CONVERSATION. So, what do I miss here? ;-)...

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stefano oldrati's comment, February 28, 2013 8:27 AM
I agree Denis that life is more complex than that yet models shouldn't be too much complicated even if complexity is to be embraced.
stefano oldrati's comment, February 28, 2013 8:34 AM
For sure as Marius says customisation is what can add value to this basic vision. There are industries, or consumer attitudes, where people can jump from awareness to purchase and engage in a medium term loyalty in a kind of shortcut because the variable to push or pull people there are different and elevate in quantity and quality they represent; example this could happen in high tech business when within the Spirit industry everything works at a slower pace even for unique performances in exceptional situations/environments. I personally witnessed some, and been responsible for, within my career... and maybe you are still enjoying some drinks I created.
Leslie Lilly's curator insight, March 20, 2013 7:07 AM

Worth a conversation that tests your own organizational theory about moving your audience and building your constituency

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The One Best Storytelling Tip

The One Best Storytelling Tip | Storybag | Scoop.it

The very best tip I’ve ever seen for good storytelling I wholeheartedly believe to be true. If you want to be a good writer and storyteller …read. I saw that admonition again most recently in my fourth time through “On Writing” by Stephen King.


Via Gregg Morris
Peter Fruhmann's insight:

Good article! Don't think too much of methods or rigid structures. Next to reading I would say: tell stories! Practice, practice, practice and you will find out what works and what not, which stories 'belong' to you and which not. Tell your children stores, try to make up stories for them by yourself (make them the hero in the stories). I can recommend that, they are a grateful (and critical!) audience if you want to learn to tell a compelling story...

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Judith van Praag's comment, February 8, 2013 1:16 PM
I can attest to that. Was an avid reader as a child, which came in handy keeping the bullies in elementary school at bay. I was the storyteller in the schoolyard, with the little jerks on the edge of the circle listening in on my tales.
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Six Tips to Improve Your Visual Storytelling (without design expertise)

Six Tips to Improve Your Visual Storytelling (without design expertise) | Storybag | Scoop.it

There’s a reason the line “a picture is worth a thousand words” became a cliché.

 

To debate whether it’s 1,000 words or 1,055 words misses the point. A visual pulls the reader into the narrative and enhances the storytelling.

 

Photo sites like Flickr make it easy to add photos into your blog posts.

 

You can do better.

 

Here are six tips to upgrade your visuals from the garden-variety photos available in the public domain. Equally important, they don’t require design expertise, just a pinch of cleverness.


Via Gregg Morris
Peter Fruhmann's insight:

Nothing new for me here, but certainly useful for starting bloggers and/or presenters

 

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Peter Fruhmann's comment, February 8, 2013 4:37 AM
Nothing new for me in here, but surely useful for starting bloggers and/or presenters...