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Nanotechnology & Health
a collection of articles about nanomaterials and health
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Genotoxicity of metal nanoparticles. [Rev Environ Health. 2011] - PubMed - NCBI

Many metal nanoparticles were found to cause chromosomal aberrations, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage, and mutations.
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EHP – Interlaboratory Evaluation of in Vitro Cytotoxicity and Inflammatory Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials: The NIEHS NanoGo Consortium

"Results: The overall in vitro toxicity profiles of ENM were: ZnO was cytotoxic to all cell types at 50 μg/mL or higher, but did not induce IL-1β. TiO2 was not cytotoxic except for the nanobelt form, which was cytotoxic and induced significant IL-1β production in THP-1 cells. MWCNT did not produce cytotoxicity, but stimulated lower levels of IL-1β production in THP-1 cells, with the original MWCNT producing the most IL-1β.

Conclusions: The results provided justification for the inclusion of mechanism-linked bioactivity assays along with traditional cytotoxicity assays for in vitro screening. In addition, the results suggest that conducting studies with multiple relevant cell types to avoid false negative outcomes is critical for accurate evaluation of ENM bioactivity."

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Do Nanomaterials Pose Health Risks? What Science Has to Say | Food Safety News

Do Nanomaterials Pose Health Risks? What Science Has to Say | Food Safety News | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

The toxicity of ENMs can be significantly different from that of conventional materials, even when the two materials have the same chemical composition.

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Super-strong, high-tech material found to be toxic to aquatic animals

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have potential uses in everything from medicine to electronics to construction. However, CNTs are not without risks. A new study found that they can be toxic to aquatic animals.
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Scientists: Nanotech-based products offer great potential but unknown risks

Scientists: Nanotech-based products offer great potential but unknown risks | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Improved sunscreens are just one of the many innovative uses of nanotechnology, which involves drastically shrinking and fundamentally changing the structure of chemical compounds. But products made with nanomaterials also raise largely unanswered safety questions — such as whether the particles that make them effective can be absorbed into the bloodstream and are toxic to living cells."

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Chloride in water affects silver nanoparticle toxicity - Chemical Watch

"Scientists from Stanford University, US, have added to the understanding of how silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) oxidise and react with ubiquitous chloride ions in the environment to alter toxicity.

 

 

“Though chloride can strongly affect toxicity results for AgNPs, their interaction is rarely considered,” write the researchers in a paper to be published in Environmental Science and Technology."

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AM - Safety concerns over nanoparticles in some sunscreens 05/03/2013

ROBERT SALMON: I think what we need to look at under these circumstances is the precautionary principle. If we want to introduce new technology into sun blocks, the people that are attempting to do that, or the manufacturers, need to prove that they don't cause problems.

I would want the labelling such that the people knew whether there were nanoparticles in these preparations or not so that the consumers could make some sort of informed choice by themselves.

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Professor of toxicology at the Australian Catholic University, Chris Winder, says further studies are critical.

CHRIS WINDER: Well this is a major policy problem. We can't just say 'Well the big sized particles are okay and therefore the small ones are as well'. This needs work.

I think that the nanoparticles may have some toxicity that we've yet to find. So I think we should be prudent and at least warn people that cosmetic products contain nanoparticles."

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Chemical Watch | News| Australia releases health risk assessment and classification of carbon nanotubes

Nicnas found that nanotubes should be classified as having “specific target organ toxicity following repeated exposure Category 2” and carry the warning “May cause damage to lungs/respiratory system through prolonged or repeated inhalation exposure” as well as Carcinogen Category 2, “suspected of causing cancer”.
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Ions, not particles, make silver toxic to bacteria: Too small a dose may enhance microbes' immunity

Ions, not particles, make silver toxic to bacteria: Too small a dose may enhance microbes' immunity | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Researchers have settled a long-standing controversy over the mechanism by which silver nanoparticles, the most widely used nanomaterial in the world, kill bacteria. Their work comes with a Nietzsche-esque warning: Use enough. If you don't kill them, you make them stronger."

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Quantum Dots May Be Toxic To Cells And Environment Under Certain Conditions

Researchers in Texas are reporting that quantum dots (QDs) -- a product of the revolution in nanotechnology increasingly used in electronics, solar cells, and medical imaging devices -- may be toxic to cells under acidic or alkaline conditions.
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