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Nanotechnology & Health
a collection of articles about nanomaterials and health
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Are you eating toxic nanoparticles for lunch? - Futurity

Are you eating toxic nanoparticles for lunch? - Futurity | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"'The penetration of silver nanoparticles is dangerous to consumers because they have the ability to relocate in the human body after digestion,' Lin says. 'Therefore, smaller nanoparticles may be more harmful to consumers than larger counterparts.'

 

When ingested, nanoparticles pass into the blood and lymph system, circulate through the body and reach potentially sensitive sites such as the spleen, brain, liver, and heart.

 

The growing trend to use other types of nanoparticles has revolutionized the food industry by enhancing flavors, improving supplement delivery, keeping food fresh longer, and brightening the colors of food. However, researchers worry that the use of silver nanoparticles could harm the human body."

 

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EPA Lets Pesticides on the Market Untested | OnEarth Magazine

EPA Lets Pesticides on the Market Untested | OnEarth Magazine | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"The agency is abusing a legal loophole to let products like nanosilver be used in your clothing and baby blankets without ensuring their safety"

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Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » Nanoparticles Found To Be Toxic to Earthworms

Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » Nanoparticles Found To Be Toxic to Earthworms | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Earthworms are excellent indicators of soil health, and provide vitally important ecosystem services by aerating the soil, cycling nutrients, and increasing microbial activity. The Alterra study, led by Doctoral candidate Merel van der Ploeg, compared the health and growth of earthworms in soil containing carbon and silver nanoparticles at varying amounts with worms in regular soil. Mr. Van der Ploeg found the soil containing nanoparticles reduced reproduction, slowed growth, and increased the mortality rate of exposed earthworms. Young worms are particularly sensitive to the effects of the nanomaterial. Mr. Van der Ploeg notes, 'I also found damage to the skin tissue and intestinal wall, often accompanied by damage to the underlying muscle, but even though tissue damage is usually associated with inflammation, I did not observe this in the earthworms. There seemed to be a suppression of the immune system.'"

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Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » EPA Challenged Over Conditional Registration of Nanosilver Product

"The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently faced tough questioning from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit over its decision to conditionally approve a pesticide product containing nanosilver as the active ingredient. The antimicrobial pesticide product, HeiQ AGS-20, contains microscopic particles of silver and has been applied to textiles such as clothes, blankets, and pillowcases, in an attempt to suppress odor and bacterial growth... Because of their size, nanoparticles can be easily inhaled, absorbed by skin contact, or ingested. Little to no information is known about the fate or effects nanoparticles, specifically nanosilver, can have on the digestive tract, lung, or skin of those that are exposed to these particles. Research is still ongoing to investigate whether nanosize particles cause pulmonary inflammation as well as systemic effects, and whether they translocate from the lungs to other organs such as the liver, kidney or brain. Preliminary research with laboratory rats has found that nanosilver can traverse into the brain, and can induce neuronal degeneration and necrosis (death of cells or tissue) by accumulating in the brain over a long period of time. Low doses of nanosilver can also make bacteria stronger and more resistant."

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EHP – Nanosilver: Weighing the Risks and Benefits

EHP – Nanosilver: Weighing the Risks and Benefits | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"NRDC lawyer Catherine Rahm ... begged to differ with the [EPA's] methods. In the January hearing, she argued that the agency record shows infants are more likely than any other subset of children to chew on fabrics that could contain the pesticide, and that if the agency were to recalculate its risk assessment based on the body weight of a 1-year-old, nanosilver concentrations in HeiQ’s product could result in potentially harmful exposures."

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Is Your Workout Gear Ruining Farm Fields?

Is Your Workout Gear Ruining Farm Fields? | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
Bacteria-killing nano silver has turned up in all manner of consumer goods. And the EPA hasn't given it a full review.
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Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » EU Report: Precautionary Approach Beneficial to Avoid Environmental Disasters

"The report points out that nanotechnology development has occurred in the absence of “clear design rules for chemists and materials developers on how to integrate health, safety and environmental concerns into design.” While the emerging area of ‘green nanotechnology’ offers promise for the future with its focus on preventive design, it is important that research on the sustainability of materials is funded at levels significant enough to identify early warnings and potential harms, and that regulatory systems provide incentives for safer and sustainable materials.  Regulators and policy-makers have yet to address many of the shortcomings in legislation, research and development, and limitations in risk assessment. EEA concludes that as a result, “There remains a developmental environment that hinders the adoption of precautionary yet socially and economically responsive strategies in the field of nanotechnology. If left unresolved, this could hamper society’s ability to ensure responsible development of nanotechnologies.”

 

Recently, EPA announced plans to obtain information on nanoscale materials in pesticide products and to register nanoscale materials as new active pesticide ingredients. The agency stated it will gather information on nanoscale materials present in pesticide products to determine whether the registration of the pesticide product may cause unreasonable adverse effects on the environment and human health."

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