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Nanotechnology & Health
a collection of articles about nanomaterials and health
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Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » Nanoparticles Found To Be Toxic to Earthworms

Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » Nanoparticles Found To Be Toxic to Earthworms | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Earthworms are excellent indicators of soil health, and provide vitally important ecosystem services by aerating the soil, cycling nutrients, and increasing microbial activity. The Alterra study, led by Doctoral candidate Merel van der Ploeg, compared the health and growth of earthworms in soil containing carbon and silver nanoparticles at varying amounts with worms in regular soil. Mr. Van der Ploeg found the soil containing nanoparticles reduced reproduction, slowed growth, and increased the mortality rate of exposed earthworms. Young worms are particularly sensitive to the effects of the nanomaterial. Mr. Van der Ploeg notes, 'I also found damage to the skin tissue and intestinal wall, often accompanied by damage to the underlying muscle, but even though tissue damage is usually associated with inflammation, I did not observe this in the earthworms. There seemed to be a suppression of the immune system.'"

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The comparative immunotoxicity of mesoporous silica nanoparticles and colloidal silica nanoparticles in mice

The comparative immunotoxicity of mesoporous silica nanoparticles and colloidal silica nanoparticles in mice | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
Results: There was no overt sign of clinical toxicity in either MPS- or Col-treated mice. However, MPS NPs led to significant increases in liver and spleen weight and splenocyte proliferation. Mice treated with MPS NPs showed altered lymphocyte populations (CD3+, CD45+, CD4+, and CD8+) in the spleen, increased serum IgG and IgM levels, and histological changes. Despite slight changes in lymphocyte populations in the spleen, Col NPs did not alter other immunological factors.
Conclusion: The results indicate that in vivo exposure to MPS NPs caused more damage to systemic immunity than that of Col NPs through the dysregulation of the spleen. The results for in vivo data are inconsistent with those for in vitro data, which show lower cytotoxicity for MPS NPs. These results suggest the importance of verifying biocompatibility both in vitro and in vivo during the design of new nanomaterials.
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