Nanotechnology & ...
Follow
Find
658 views | +0 today
Nanotechnology & Health
a collection of articles about nanomaterials and health
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Futurity.org – Are those tiny gold particles bad for you?

Futurity.org – Are those tiny gold particles bad for you? | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Pure gold nanoparticles found in everyday items such as personal care products can inhibit fat storage, slow wound healing, and accelerate wrinkling. ... The most disturbing finding was that the particles interfered with genetic regulation, RNA expression and inhibited the ability to differentiate into mature adipocytes or fat cells."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota from NanoRegulation
Scoop.it!

Narrowing in on nanoparticles

Narrowing in on nanoparticles | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Workers in manufacturing can encounter a range of hazards on the job, but some of those dangers can pass unseen. Such is the case with nanoparticles, so tiny they can be inhaled and put workers at risk for various ailments, including lung cancer.

 

University of Iowa researchers, led by Tom Peters, associate professor of occupational and environmental health in the UI College of Public Health, have created a device that can detect certain nanoparticles, such as titanium dioxide, and workers’ exposure to them. The device is called the personal Nanoparticle Respiratory Deposition sampler."


Via Erik Janus
more...
Erik Janus's curator insight, April 3, 2013 3:28 PM

The upper range of this is 300 nm, but I am curious as to what the other two filters are sized at and if you could swap out different sized filters.  It appears as if material-specfiic analytical methods are needed to determine chemical composition, so hopefully the pipeline for those is full and moving...

Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

EPA Lets Pesticides on the Market Untested | OnEarth Magazine

EPA Lets Pesticides on the Market Untested | OnEarth Magazine | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"The agency is abusing a legal loophole to let products like nanosilver be used in your clothing and baby blankets without ensuring their safety"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Chemical Watch | Nanoparticles linked to reduced sperm counts and weight loss

"Prenatal exposure to nanoparticles may adversely affect sperm production in offspring, according to a Danish study on mice. ... Meanwhile, an Indian study on mice suggests a link between daily oral exposure to silver nanoparticles and weight loss. Scientists from Utter Pradesh used transmission electron microscopy to reveal that the nanoparticles may have damaged cells in the intestine as well as intestinal glands. The study is published in Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Tracking nano technology's environmental risks a tough task

Tracking nano technology's environmental risks a tough task | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"The most common way for nanoparticles to enter the environment is when they're washed down the drain, Diamond said. For example, the nano silver in socks, and the nano titanium in sunscreen or cosmetics ends up in sewage treatment plants. Diamond said it appears most of those particles are trapped in the sludge that remains after wastewater is treated. In that scenario, we would be more concerned about the application of sludge from wastewater treatment plants on crop lands which is a prevalent activity in the United States," he said. In Minnesota about 46,000 tons of dried sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants were spread on about 16,000 acres of farmland last year before farmers planted corn or soybeans. According to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, 91,000 tons are incinerated and 20,000 tons are put in landfills. There's no easy way to test that sludge for nanoparticles."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » Silver Nanoparticles in Sewage Sludge Found to Disrupt Ecosystems

Low concentrations of silver nanoparticles can cause significant disruptions to natural ecosystems, find scientists at Duke University. This research, published in the journal PLOS ONE, provides a “real-world” look at the effects of this increasingly ubiquitous material in our environment.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

foodconsumer.org - Silica in food, dietary supplements damages the liver

foodconsumer.org - Silica in food, dietary supplements damages the liver | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
Thursday Feb 14, 2013 (foodconsumer.org) -- A new study published in  Advanced Materials Research suggests that food consumers may be better off avoiding dietary supplements and processed foods that contain silica and other nanoparticles as the study found that silica which is also known as silicone dioxide can damage the liver.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Chemical Watch | Review warns insurers to check nanomaterial liability

"The review says that nanomaterials may be implicitly covered in insurance policies, and recommends that liability insurers check their portfolios to assess which kind of nano-related risks they covered."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Study Looks at Particles Used in Food

Study Looks at Particles Used in Food | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Their small size allows nanoparticles to go places in the body where larger particles cannot and enter cells. They have been found in the blood stream after ingestion and inhalation, and while research on their health effects is limited, studies have shown them to have deleterious effects on mice and cells."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » EU Report: Precautionary Approach Beneficial to Avoid Environmental Disasters

"The report points out that nanotechnology development has occurred in the absence of “clear design rules for chemists and materials developers on how to integrate health, safety and environmental concerns into design.” While the emerging area of ‘green nanotechnology’ offers promise for the future with its focus on preventive design, it is important that research on the sustainability of materials is funded at levels significant enough to identify early warnings and potential harms, and that regulatory systems provide incentives for safer and sustainable materials.  Regulators and policy-makers have yet to address many of the shortcomings in legislation, research and development, and limitations in risk assessment. EEA concludes that as a result, “There remains a developmental environment that hinders the adoption of precautionary yet socially and economically responsive strategies in the field of nanotechnology. If left unresolved, this could hamper society’s ability to ensure responsible development of nanotechnologies.”

 

Recently, EPA announced plans to obtain information on nanoscale materials in pesticide products and to register nanoscale materials as new active pesticide ingredients. The agency stated it will gather information on nanoscale materials present in pesticide products to determine whether the registration of the pesticide product may cause unreasonable adverse effects on the environment and human health."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Top scientists call for regulation of nano-particles in consumer goods

Top scientists call for regulation of nano-particles in consumer goods | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
Leading scientists are calling for the regulation of nano-particles in consumer goods until we better understand their longer-term impacts on human health and the environment.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Chemical Watch | News Item | Size matters for gold nanoparticle toxicity, says JRC

"The toxicity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) varies significantly with size according to studies at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy... The study showed the total gold content in the cells to increase steadily with exposure time, while nanoparticles did not reach the cell nucleus, but were confined in vesicles within the cell."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Chemical Watch | News Item | Rodent study suggests nanoparticles may affect sperm count

"The offspring of pregnant mice exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles may have reduced sperm counts and take longer to have their first litter, according to a Danish study."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Electronic Cigarettes Contain Higher Levels of Toxic Metal Nanopartices Than Tobacco Smoke

Electronic Cigarettes Contain Higher Levels of Toxic Metal Nanopartices Than Tobacco Smoke | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
A concerning new study found that the aerosol from electronic cigarettes contains higher levels of measurable nanoparticle heavy metals than conventional tobacco smoke.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Chemical Watch | News Item | Burning issue of waste nanomaterials

"Incinerating waste containing nanomaterials could increase emissions of some types of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), according to a US study.

 

Disposal of some waste containing nanomaterials through incineration is inevitable, says the research team, led by Linsey Marr from Virginia Tech. They incinerated paper and plastic waste containing a range of nanomaterials and monitored the chemicals released."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Is Your Workout Gear Ruining Farm Fields?

Is Your Workout Gear Ruining Farm Fields? | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
Bacteria-killing nano silver has turned up in all manner of consumer goods. And the EPA hasn't given it a full review.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Presence of Untested Nanoparticles in Food Raises Public Health Concerns | Cornucopia Institute

Presence of Untested Nanoparticles in Food Raises Public Health Concerns | Cornucopia Institute | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Because of their small size, nanoparticles can to go places in the body that larger particles cannot.  Nanoparticles in food or food packaging can gain access via ingestion, inhalation, or skin penetration.  Once inside our bodies, nanoparticles can penetrate cell walls and pass into the blood and lymph system.

 

From there, the particles can circulate through the body and reach potentially sensitive target sites such as the bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and heart, and may also cross the blood‐brain barrier.  As You Sow’s survey results indicate that food, food packaging, and supplement companies are not being transparent about their use of nanomaterials.

 

The survey was sent to 2,500 companies in the food industry, including the 100 largest food processing companies, the 50 largest food distributors, the 75 largest food retailers, the 25 top packaging companies, the 50 top fast food companies, and 187 supplement companies. It yielded only 26 responses and a third of those companies admitted they did not know if nanomaterials are present in their products or supply chains. Only two companies had formal policies on the use of this new food additive that has undergone little or no safety testing."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

AM - Safety concerns over nanoparticles in some sunscreens 05/03/2013

ROBERT SALMON: I think what we need to look at under these circumstances is the precautionary principle. If we want to introduce new technology into sun blocks, the people that are attempting to do that, or the manufacturers, need to prove that they don't cause problems.

I would want the labelling such that the people knew whether there were nanoparticles in these preparations or not so that the consumers could make some sort of informed choice by themselves.

...

 

Professor of toxicology at the Australian Catholic University, Chris Winder, says further studies are critical.

CHRIS WINDER: Well this is a major policy problem. We can't just say 'Well the big sized particles are okay and therefore the small ones are as well'. This needs work.

I think that the nanoparticles may have some toxicity that we've yet to find. So I think we should be prudent and at least warn people that cosmetic products contain nanoparticles."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Chemical Watch | News Item | Soya crops take up cerium nanoparticles

Cerium dioxide nanoparticles in soil can migrate into crop plants, according to a US study on soya bean plants funded by the National Science Foundation and the US EPA.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

EHP – ONE Nano: NIEHS’s Strategic Initiative on the Health and Safety Effects of Engineered Nanomaterials

"Currently, little is known about the health effects of human exposure to these materials.


Objectives: As part of its role in supporting the National Nanotechnology Initiative, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has developed an integrated, strategic research program—“ONE Nano”—to increase our fundamental understanding of how ENMs interact with living systems, develop predictive models for quantifying ENM exposure and assessing ENM health impacts, and guide the design of second-generation ENMs to minimize adverse health effects."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Little Blog Post About Little Particles

Little Blog Post About Little Particles | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"unlike most particles, nanoparticles are so little they can pass through otherwise impermeable membranes. There is concern that when you breathe in nanoparticles, they can go straight through your nasal passages into your brain; when you swallow them, they can cross the supposedly impermeable barrier between your digestive system and the rest of your body, entering your bloodsteam before being digested."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » Nanoparticles Found To Be Toxic to Earthworms

Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » Nanoparticles Found To Be Toxic to Earthworms | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Earthworms are excellent indicators of soil health, and provide vitally important ecosystem services by aerating the soil, cycling nutrients, and increasing microbial activity. The Alterra study, led by Doctoral candidate Merel van der Ploeg, compared the health and growth of earthworms in soil containing carbon and silver nanoparticles at varying amounts with worms in regular soil. Mr. Van der Ploeg found the soil containing nanoparticles reduced reproduction, slowed growth, and increased the mortality rate of exposed earthworms. Young worms are particularly sensitive to the effects of the nanomaterial. Mr. Van der Ploeg notes, 'I also found damage to the skin tissue and intestinal wall, often accompanied by damage to the underlying muscle, but even though tissue damage is usually associated with inflammation, I did not observe this in the earthworms. There seemed to be a suppression of the immune system.'"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Chemical Watch | News Item | Zinc oxide nanoparticles toxic to marine algae

"Zinc oxide nanoparticles are more toxic to marine algae than bulk zinc oxide, according to an Italian study... The nanoparticles affected algal growth more than the bulk compound, say the researchers, most likely because of 'peculiar physicochemical properties of the nanostate'."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

The tiniest particles that may be a threat as bad as asbestos

The tiniest particles that may be a threat as bad as asbestos | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

Europe is failing to control a burgeoning industry in microscopic materials, prompting claims that it has failed to heed the lessons from millions of asbestos deaths, according to a hard-hitting new report... A major study published by the European Environment Agency (EEA) last week says European governments – including the UK's – are "paralysed by analysis" and failing to act: "Twenty years have elapsed since first indications of nanomaterial harm were published", it said, "and in the intervening time an increasing body of literature has been developed on how nanomaterials interact with cells, mammals and aquatic organisms. Yet many governments still call for more information as a substitute for action."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » EPA Challenged Over Conditional Registration of Nanosilver Product

"The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently faced tough questioning from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit over its decision to conditionally approve a pesticide product containing nanosilver as the active ingredient. The antimicrobial pesticide product, HeiQ AGS-20, contains microscopic particles of silver and has been applied to textiles such as clothes, blankets, and pillowcases, in an attempt to suppress odor and bacterial growth... Because of their size, nanoparticles can be easily inhaled, absorbed by skin contact, or ingested. Little to no information is known about the fate or effects nanoparticles, specifically nanosilver, can have on the digestive tract, lung, or skin of those that are exposed to these particles. Research is still ongoing to investigate whether nanosize particles cause pulmonary inflammation as well as systemic effects, and whether they translocate from the lungs to other organs such as the liver, kidney or brain. Preliminary research with laboratory rats has found that nanosilver can traverse into the brain, and can induce neuronal degeneration and necrosis (death of cells or tissue) by accumulating in the brain over a long period of time. Low doses of nanosilver can also make bacteria stronger and more resistant."

more...
No comment yet.