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Nanotechnology & Health
a collection of articles about nanomaterials and health
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Jagged graphene edges can slice and dice cell membranes | Brown University News and Events

Jagged graphene edges can slice and dice cell membranes | Brown University News and Events | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
A collaboration of biologists, engineers, and material scientists at Brown University has found that jagged edges of graphene can easily pierce cell membranes, allowing graphene to enter the cell and disrupt normal function.
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Could your 3D printer make you ill?

Could your 3D printer make you ill? | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Researchers have found that commercially available desktop 3D printers could emit potentially harmful particles into indoor air, which could lead to adverse health conditions.

The researchers, who have published their work in the journal Atmospheric Environment, say inhaling a high amount of these particles has been associated with adverse health conditions, such as asthma and cardiorespiratory illnesses, and studies have linked elevated ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations with increased hospital admissions for stroke."

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EHP – Nanosilver: Weighing the Risks and Benefits

EHP – Nanosilver: Weighing the Risks and Benefits | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"NRDC lawyer Catherine Rahm ... begged to differ with the [EPA's] methods. In the January hearing, she argued that the agency record shows infants are more likely than any other subset of children to chew on fabrics that could contain the pesticide, and that if the agency were to recalculate its risk assessment based on the body weight of a 1-year-old, nanosilver concentrations in HeiQ’s product could result in potentially harmful exposures."

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Germany publishes recommendations on nano workers' safety - Chemical Watch

Germany’s Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (Baua) has made recommendations aiming to protect the health and safety of workers handling substances containing nanomaterials.
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Nanoparticles In Athletic Apparel May Seep Into Sweat | Chemical & Engineering News

Nanoparticles In Athletic Apparel May Seep Into Sweat | Chemical & Engineering News | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"For some lines of clothing, nanoparticles are the new fashion accessory. Manufacturers add the materials to clothing to prevent stinky molds from growing on sweaty socks or to protect people from the sun’s ultraviolet light. However, some toxicologists worry that the intimate contact between the clothing and skin may expose people to nanoparticles. In a new study, researchers measured how much of the materials leach off clothing into simulated sweat. (Environ. Sci. Tech. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/es304329w). They found that some pieces of clothing released significant levels of silver nanoparticles."

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foodconsumer.org - Silica nanoparticles may cause cardiovascular disease

foodconsumer.org - Silica nanoparticles may cause cardiovascular disease | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"A new study published in the July 2013 issue of Biomaterials suggests that ingestion of silica nanoparticles which are commonly used in processed foods and dietary supplements can induce cardiovascular disease."

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Report warns 'healthier Europeans' of emerging chemical risks - Chemical Watch

"[N]anotechnology applications may be an emerging risk, as little is known about the effects of nanomaterials on the human body."

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Agricultural nanotechnology and the future of food - Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

Nanotechnology, a group of techniques for manufacturing and manipulating sub-molecular sized materials, is being applied to agriculture, food processing and food packaging. This webinar will discuss the effect of nanomaterials on soil health and the food chain.
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Chloride in water affects silver nanoparticle toxicity - Chemical Watch

"Scientists from Stanford University, US, have added to the understanding of how silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) oxidise and react with ubiquitous chloride ions in the environment to alter toxicity.

 

 

“Though chloride can strongly affect toxicity results for AgNPs, their interaction is rarely considered,” write the researchers in a paper to be published in Environmental Science and Technology."

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EHP – Interlaboratory Evaluation of in Vitro Cytotoxicity and Inflammatory Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials: The NIEHS NanoGo Consortium

"Results: The overall in vitro toxicity profiles of ENM were: ZnO was cytotoxic to all cell types at 50 μg/mL or higher, but did not induce IL-1β. TiO2 was not cytotoxic except for the nanobelt form, which was cytotoxic and induced significant IL-1β production in THP-1 cells. MWCNT did not produce cytotoxicity, but stimulated lower levels of IL-1β production in THP-1 cells, with the original MWCNT producing the most IL-1β.

Conclusions: The results provided justification for the inclusion of mechanism-linked bioactivity assays along with traditional cytotoxicity assays for in vitro screening. In addition, the results suggest that conducting studies with multiple relevant cell types to avoid false negative outcomes is critical for accurate evaluation of ENM bioactivity."

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EHP – Interlaboratory Evaluation of Rodent Pulmonary Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials: The NIEHS NanoGo Consortium

"Results: TiO2-A, TiO2-P25, and TiO2-NB caused significant neutrophilia in mice at 1 day in 3 out of 4 labs, respectively. TiO2-NB caused neutrophilia in rats at 1 day in 2 out of 3 labs, while TiO2-P25 or TiO2-A had no significant effect in any of the labs. Inflammation induced by TiO2 in mice and rats resolved by day 7. All MWCNT types caused neutrophilia at 1 day in 3 out of 4 mouse labs and all rat labs. Three out of 4 labs observed similar histopathology to O-MWCNT or TiO2-NB in mice.

Conclusions: ENMs produced similar patterns of neutrophilia and pathology in rats and mice. Although inter-laboratory variability was found in the degree of neutrophilia caused by the three types of TiO2 nanoparticles, similar findings of relative potency for the three types of MWCNTs were found across all laboratories, thus providing greater confidence in these inter-laboratory comparisons."

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Nanoparticles in our Food?

Nanoparticles in our Food? | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
If we didn’t have enough to worry about in the grocery aisles, with GMOs, toxic additives, and pesticide-soaked foods, we can now add a new concern:  nanoparticles.
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Nanomaterials In Soil: Our Future Food Chain? | Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

Nanomaterials In Soil: Our Future Food Chain? | Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Here we review a small part of the rapidly growing scientific literature that raises questions about how ENMs might affect soil health and soil biodiversity in field trials and subsequently the commercial and chronic application of ENMs in agricultural soil. The questions concern not only the intentional use of ENMs in fertilizers, but the incidental presence of ENMs in “biosolids,” defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as “treated residuals from wastewater treatment that can be used beneficially.”11 Biosolids are often used to fertilize agricultural fields. As a Purdue University researcher recently noted, “Land application of biosolids is standard procedure now [at least in the United States] . . . If any of that [biosolid] contains nanotubes, that could be a problem.”"

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Genotoxicity of metal nanoparticles. [Rev Environ Health. 2011] - PubMed - NCBI

Many metal nanoparticles were found to cause chromosomal aberrations, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage, and mutations.
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The Hidden Threat in Your Workout Gear | Rodale News

The Hidden Threat in Your Workout Gear | Rodale News | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

A lot of workout clothing advertised as "antibacterial" or "anti-odor" contains microscopic particles, or nanoparticles, of silver. ... Sounds great, right? Except that silver nanoparticles aren't bound to that antibacterial clothing, and the teeny particles slough off every time you wash your sweaty clothes. And, according to a new study in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, they get absorbed by your skin when you sweat, exposing you to untested, and potentially unhealthy, levels of this metal.

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Ingested nanoparticle toxicity - Phys.org

Ingestion of commonly encountered nanoparticles at typical environmental levels is unlikely to cause overt toxicity, according to US researchers. Nevertheless there is insufficient evidence to determine whether chronic exposures could lead to subtle alterations in intestinal immune function, protein profiles, or microbial balance.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-06-ingested-nanoparticle-toxicity.html#jCp

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'Self-cleaning' pollution-control technology could do more harm than good, study suggests

Environmental scientists shows that air-pollution-removal technology used in "self-cleaning" paints and building surfaces may actually cause more problems than they solve. The study finds that titanium dioxide coatings, seen as promising for their role in breaking down airborne pollutants on contact, are likely in real-world conditions to convert abundant ammonia to nitrogen oxide, the key precursor of harmful ozone pollution.
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EHP - Engineered Nanoparticles in Consumer Products: Understanding a New Ingredient

'[W]hile many critics say they are enthusiastic about some of those positive applications, they remain adamant that safety research and regulation must catch up and keep up with the technology’s proliferation. “I think we need to take a precautionary approach because we’ve learned the hard way over and over and over again,” says Hansen. “You’d think we would learn.”"

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New Chemicals: Sell First, Test for Safety Later? - Environmental Working Group

New Chemicals: Sell First, Test for Safety Later? - Environmental Working Group | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"And what about new nanomaterials?

The original Lautenberg proposal would have allowed EPA to regulate novel nanomaterials more rigorously. It contained language that would have updated the definition of “chemical substance” to reflect the new science of nanotechnology, which exploits changes in size and shape of materials to manipulate their behavior, but also may present new health risks.

The Lautenberg-Vitter bill would maintain the status quo. It would give EPA no more power to oversee nanotechnology, despite the rapid development of these materials. That’s a serious gap.  As a chemist specializing in nanotechnology, I know that certain nanomaterials can present greater hazards to health and the environment than ordinary ones. The EPA needs to have the ability to distinguish among different material forms to ensure that both new and existing nanomaterials are safe for us all."

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Graphene could have adverse environmental effects, study suggests - Chemical Watch

"The nanomaterial graphene has potentially adverse environmental and health risks, according to a Swedish review. ... “Considerable” emissions of graphene from electronic devices and composites are possible in future, write the researchers in Human and Ecological Risk Assessment. “There are many risk-related knowledge gaps to be filled,” they add."

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UAE to require labelling of nano cosmetic ingredients - Chemical Watch

"A United Arab Emirates draft cosmetics regulation, notified to the World Trade Organization (WTO), contains a requirement for companies to label cosmetic products containing nanomaterials. The requirement is similar to the one found in the EU cosmetics Regulation."

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Inhaling nanoparticles may injure lungs - Futurity: Research News

Inhaling nanoparticles may injure lungs - Futurity: Research News | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
Inhaling nanoparticles may injure lungs Futurity: Research News The current study used mice to examine the health effects of inhaling two types of nanomaterials, those made from titanium dioxide and those made from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, a...
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EHP – Nano GO Consortium—A Team Science Approach to Assess Engineered Nanomaterials: Reliable Assays and Methods

EHP – Nano GO Consortium—A Team Science Approach to Assess Engineered Nanomaterials: Reliable Assays and Methods | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"The physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of ENMs that make them useful for so many applications also make them potentially hazardous for living systems. The unique properties stemming from their small dimensions, such as high reactivity, large surface area, and the tunable nature of their optical, electrical, and magnetic properties, differentiate them from other materials in fundamental ways. The vast and expanding array of ENMs entering the environment could present health risks to researchers, workers, and consumers. Although researchers have made progress in understanding biological responses to nanomaterials, the risks of exposure are not sufficiently understood to allow development of science-based risk assessment guidelines to support regulatory decision making (Maynard et al. 2006). There is a need to examine nanomaterial exposure, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion and to relate ENM properties to biological responses at the cellular, tissue, and whole-organism level."

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Nanomaterials in fertilizer products could threaten soil health, agriculture | Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

Nanomaterials in fertilizer products could threaten soil health, agriculture | Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"“In light of published research, the Obama administration should institute an immediate moratorium on fertilizing with biosolids from sewage treatment plants near nanomaterial fabrication facilities. A moratorium would give researchers time to determine whether nanomaterials in soil can be made safe and to research alternatives to building soil heath, rather than depending on fertilization with biosolids.” says IATP’s Dr. Steve Suppan.

Over time, the report explains, nanomaterials in these agricultural inputs can accumulate and harm soil health. More research is urgently needed to adequately understand possible long-term impacts of nanotechnology.

“As agri-nanotechnology rapidly enters the market, can soil health and everything that depends on it can be sustained without regulation?” asks Suppan. “That’s the question regulators, researchers and anyone involved in our food system should be asking themselves.”

The report also details risks specific to farmers and farmworkers applying dried biosolids that incorporate nanomaterials, including inflammation of the lungs, fibrosis and other toxicological impacts."

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CDC - NIOSH Publications and Products - Current Intelligence Bulletin 65: Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers (2013-145)

CDC - NIOSH Publications and Products - Current Intelligence Bulletin 65: Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers (2013-145) | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"These results indicate that MWCNT can increase the risk of cancer in mice exposed to a known carcinogen. The study did not indicate that MWCNTs alone cause cancer in mice. This research is an important step in our understanding of the hazards associated with MWCNT, but before we can determine whether MWCNT pose an occupational cancer risk, we need more information about workplace exposures, the types and nature of MWCNT being used in the workplace, and how that compares to the material used in this study. Research is underway at NIOSH to learn more about worker exposures and the potential occupational health risks associated with exposure to MWCNT and other types of CNTs and CNFs. As results from ongoing research become available, NIOSH will reassess its recommendations for CNT and CNF and make appropriate revisions as needed. NIOSH urges employers to share this information with workers and customers. NIOSH also requests that professional and trade associations and labor organizations inform their members about the potential hazards of CNT and CNF."

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