Nanotechnology & ...
Follow
Find tag "immunity"
707 views | +1 today
Nanotechnology & Health
a collection of articles about nanomaterials and health
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Nanoparticles Could Disrupt Immune Cell Function | Chemical & Engineering News

Nanoparticles Could Disrupt Immune Cell Function | Chemical & Engineering News | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"A new study suggests there’s more to nanoparticle toxicology than cell life and death. Although immune cells treated with iron oxide particles appeared healthy in standard toxicology tests, they struggled to perform one of their key jobs: engulfing pathogenic bacteria (ACS Nano 2013, DOI: 10.1021/nn402145t). The researchers wonder if exposure to significant levels of the nanoparticles could lead to dysfunction in people’s immune systems."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

Ions, not particles, make silver toxic to bacteria: Too small a dose may enhance microbes' immunity

Ions, not particles, make silver toxic to bacteria: Too small a dose may enhance microbes' immunity | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Researchers have settled a long-standing controversy over the mechanism by which silver nanoparticles, the most widely used nanomaterial in the world, kill bacteria. Their work comes with a Nietzsche-esque warning: Use enough. If you don't kill them, you make them stronger."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Environmental Illness Network Minnesota
Scoop.it!

The comparative immunotoxicity of mesoporous silica nanoparticles and colloidal silica nanoparticles in mice

The comparative immunotoxicity of mesoporous silica nanoparticles and colloidal silica nanoparticles in mice | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
Results: There was no overt sign of clinical toxicity in either MPS- or Col-treated mice. However, MPS NPs led to significant increases in liver and spleen weight and splenocyte proliferation. Mice treated with MPS NPs showed altered lymphocyte populations (CD3+, CD45+, CD4+, and CD8+) in the spleen, increased serum IgG and IgM levels, and histological changes. Despite slight changes in lymphocyte populations in the spleen, Col NPs did not alter other immunological factors.
Conclusion: The results indicate that in vivo exposure to MPS NPs caused more damage to systemic immunity than that of Col NPs through the dysregulation of the spleen. The results for in vivo data are inconsistent with those for in vitro data, which show lower cytotoxicity for MPS NPs. These results suggest the importance of verifying biocompatibility both in vitro and in vivo during the design of new nanomaterials.
more...
No comment yet.