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Nanotechnology & Health
a collection of articles about nanomaterials and health
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Nanotech labels for food wanted and the public are prepared to pay for it - Medical News Today

"New research from North Carolina State University and the University of Minnesota finds that people in the United States want labels on food products that use nanotechnology - whether the nanotechnology is in the food or is used in food packaging. The research also shows that many people are willing to pay more for the labeling."

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Photosensitivity and photodynamic events in black, red and blue tattoos are common: A 'Beach Study' [J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

"Complaints such as swelling, itching, stinging, pain and redness are common, predominantly in black and red tattoos, but also frequent in blue tattoos, thus, not confined to one specific colour or chemical entity or class of pigment. Symptoms may switch on and off in seconds, typically not of the weal-and-flare type. Photochemical reactions to pigment or pigment-breakdown products in situ in the skin with induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is presumed to be one causative mechanism. Another possible mechanism especially relevant in black may be induction of ROS due to effects of aggregation of carbon black nanoparticles."

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Nanotech innovation high, but 'playing catch-up' on health and safety - Nanotechnology: Harmful or Benign? | Investigative Reporting Workshop

Nanotech innovation high, but 'playing catch-up' on health and safety - Nanotechnology: Harmful or Benign? | Investigative Reporting Workshop | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"The businesses and trade groups lobbying against proposed action on nanotechnology by the EPA, the Food and Drug Administration and other federal agencies include the American Chemistry Council and its nanotechnology business panel. Among the panel’s members are Procter & Gamble, BASF Corp., Dow Chemical Co., DuPont, Lockheed Martin Corp. and 3M, all of which use nanomaterial in making at least some of their products or processes. Other key lobbying groups are the NanoBusiness Commercialization Association and the Nanotechnology Industries Association. Nanotechnology practices have sprung up in law and lobby firms, among them Steptoe & Johnson LLP, Foley & Lardner LLP and Bergeson & Campbell PC. The combined amount of money spent on lobbying by these firms last year was more than $200 million, and their campaign contributions to federal candidates during the 2011-2012 election cycle exceeded $120 million.

 

One of the best-known scientist-lobbyists, Rosalind Volpe, made a name for herself defending another industry with a public health and environmental public relations problem: lead. Volpe runs the Silver Nanotechnology Working Group and remains a consultant to the International Lead Zinc Research Organization.

 

“She knows how to lobby for difficult chemicals,” said Jaydee Hanson, a senior policy analyst at the Center for Food Safety, which studies the impact of nanotechnology on food. “She works for five little companies, but they’ve managed to hold up regulations over at the OMB,” a reference to the White House Office of Management and Budget."

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Jake Donald's curator insight, February 18, 5:27 PM

Nanotechnology is a topic on the rise.  This technology deals with the manipulation of nanoparticles on a microscopic level.  Nanotechnology has lead to advancements in agriculture, medicine, electronics, and almost every sector of commerce.  The world market is expected to purchase $2.6 trillion in nanomaterials by the year 2015.

 

Interviews with professionals and regulators showed no result in whether nanotechnology was harmful to health.  Public health officials are troubled by this because many companies can market this technology without knowing that it is harmful.  Many big businesses already use nanotechnology in their products.

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Changes in neurotransmitter levels and proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expressions in the mice olfactory bulb following nanoparticle exposure. [Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2008] - PubMed - NCBI

Recently, there have been increasing reports that nano-sized component of particulate matter can reach the brain and may be associated with neurodegenerative diseases.
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Nanoparticles Could Disrupt Immune Cell Function | Chemical & Engineering News

Nanoparticles Could Disrupt Immune Cell Function | Chemical & Engineering News | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"A new study suggests there’s more to nanoparticle toxicology than cell life and death. Although immune cells treated with iron oxide particles appeared healthy in standard toxicology tests, they struggled to perform one of their key jobs: engulfing pathogenic bacteria (ACS Nano 2013, DOI: 10.1021/nn402145t). The researchers wonder if exposure to significant levels of the nanoparticles could lead to dysfunction in people’s immune systems."

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Could your 3D printer make you ill?

Could your 3D printer make you ill? | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Researchers have found that commercially available desktop 3D printers could emit potentially harmful particles into indoor air, which could lead to adverse health conditions.

The researchers, who have published their work in the journal Atmospheric Environment, say inhaling a high amount of these particles has been associated with adverse health conditions, such as asthma and cardiorespiratory illnesses, and studies have linked elevated ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations with increased hospital admissions for stroke."

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EHP – Nanosilver: Weighing the Risks and Benefits

EHP – Nanosilver: Weighing the Risks and Benefits | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"NRDC lawyer Catherine Rahm ... begged to differ with the [EPA's] methods. In the January hearing, she argued that the agency record shows infants are more likely than any other subset of children to chew on fabrics that could contain the pesticide, and that if the agency were to recalculate its risk assessment based on the body weight of a 1-year-old, nanosilver concentrations in HeiQ’s product could result in potentially harmful exposures."

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Nanoparticles In Athletic Apparel May Seep Into Sweat | Chemical & Engineering News

Nanoparticles In Athletic Apparel May Seep Into Sweat | Chemical & Engineering News | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"For some lines of clothing, nanoparticles are the new fashion accessory. Manufacturers add the materials to clothing to prevent stinky molds from growing on sweaty socks or to protect people from the sun’s ultraviolet light. However, some toxicologists worry that the intimate contact between the clothing and skin may expose people to nanoparticles. In a new study, researchers measured how much of the materials leach off clothing into simulated sweat. (Environ. Sci. Tech. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/es304329w). They found that some pieces of clothing released significant levels of silver nanoparticles."

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Inhaling nanoparticles may injure lungs - Futurity: Research News

Inhaling nanoparticles may injure lungs - Futurity: Research News | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
Inhaling nanoparticles may injure lungs Futurity: Research News The current study used mice to examine the health effects of inhaling two types of nanomaterials, those made from titanium dioxide and those made from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, a...
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Futurity.org – Are those tiny gold particles bad for you?

Futurity.org – Are those tiny gold particles bad for you? | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Pure gold nanoparticles found in everyday items such as personal care products can inhibit fat storage, slow wound healing, and accelerate wrinkling. ... The most disturbing finding was that the particles interfered with genetic regulation, RNA expression and inhibited the ability to differentiate into mature adipocytes or fat cells."

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EHP – ONE Nano: NIEHS’s Strategic Initiative on the Health and Safety Effects of Engineered Nanomaterials

"Currently, little is known about the health effects of human exposure to these materials.


Objectives: As part of its role in supporting the National Nanotechnology Initiative, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has developed an integrated, strategic research program—“ONE Nano”—to increase our fundamental understanding of how ENMs interact with living systems, develop predictive models for quantifying ENM exposure and assessing ENM health impacts, and guide the design of second-generation ENMs to minimize adverse health effects."

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The tiniest particles that may be a threat as bad as asbestos

The tiniest particles that may be a threat as bad as asbestos | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

Europe is failing to control a burgeoning industry in microscopic materials, prompting claims that it has failed to heed the lessons from millions of asbestos deaths, according to a hard-hitting new report... A major study published by the European Environment Agency (EEA) last week says European governments – including the UK's – are "paralysed by analysis" and failing to act: "Twenty years have elapsed since first indications of nanomaterial harm were published", it said, "and in the intervening time an increasing body of literature has been developed on how nanomaterials interact with cells, mammals and aquatic organisms. Yet many governments still call for more information as a substitute for action."

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Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » Nanotechnology Database Launched in Denmark

Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » Nanotechnology Database Launched in Denmark | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Currently, USDA organic certified products are the last refuge for consumers wanting to [avoid] nanomaterials... Overall, little is being done to review, regulate, or safety test nanotechnology that is currently being used in agriculture and food processing, ingredients and packaging."

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Are you eating toxic nanoparticles for lunch? - Futurity

Are you eating toxic nanoparticles for lunch? - Futurity | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"'The penetration of silver nanoparticles is dangerous to consumers because they have the ability to relocate in the human body after digestion,' Lin says. 'Therefore, smaller nanoparticles may be more harmful to consumers than larger counterparts.'

 

When ingested, nanoparticles pass into the blood and lymph system, circulate through the body and reach potentially sensitive sites such as the spleen, brain, liver, and heart.

 

The growing trend to use other types of nanoparticles has revolutionized the food industry by enhancing flavors, improving supplement delivery, keeping food fresh longer, and brightening the colors of food. However, researchers worry that the use of silver nanoparticles could harm the human body."

 

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The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics : Nanotechnology

The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics : Nanotechnology | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Beware personal care products that tout use of nanoparticles, nanomaterials or nanotechnology. This emerging technology is almost entirely untested for its health effects, and no requirements exist for either testing or labeling these products to make sure consumers are both safe and informed. That means that you might be getting a dose of nano without even knowing it."

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Analysis of the occupational, consumer and environmental exposure to engineered nanomaterials used in 10 technology sectors - Informa Healthcare

"Based on the likelihood of exposure, it appears that in general most attention should be paid to the agrifood, chemistry/materials, textiles and health sectors; and less to the information and communication technology (ICT), security and energy sectors. Toxicity and exposure are both important; however, the EHS impact of nanomaterials is always dependent on their particular use."
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EHP – Size-Fractionated Particle Number Concentrations and Daily Mortality in a Chinese City

"Our findings suggest that particles < 0.5 µm in diameter may be most responsible for adverse health effects of particulate air pollution, and that adverse health effects may increase with decreasing particle size."

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Jagged graphene edges can slice and dice cell membranes | Brown University News and Events

Jagged graphene edges can slice and dice cell membranes | Brown University News and Events | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
A collaboration of biologists, engineers, and material scientists at Brown University has found that jagged edges of graphene can easily pierce cell membranes, allowing graphene to enter the cell and disrupt normal function.
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The Hidden Threat in Your Workout Gear | Rodale News

The Hidden Threat in Your Workout Gear | Rodale News | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

A lot of workout clothing advertised as "antibacterial" or "anti-odor" contains microscopic particles, or nanoparticles, of silver. ... Sounds great, right? Except that silver nanoparticles aren't bound to that antibacterial clothing, and the teeny particles slough off every time you wash your sweaty clothes. And, according to a new study in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, they get absorbed by your skin when you sweat, exposing you to untested, and potentially unhealthy, levels of this metal.

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Ingested nanoparticle toxicity - Phys.org

Ingestion of commonly encountered nanoparticles at typical environmental levels is unlikely to cause overt toxicity, according to US researchers. Nevertheless there is insufficient evidence to determine whether chronic exposures could lead to subtle alterations in intestinal immune function, protein profiles, or microbial balance.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-06-ingested-nanoparticle-toxicity.html#jCp

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foodconsumer.org - Silica nanoparticles may cause cardiovascular disease

foodconsumer.org - Silica nanoparticles may cause cardiovascular disease | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"A new study published in the July 2013 issue of Biomaterials suggests that ingestion of silica nanoparticles which are commonly used in processed foods and dietary supplements can induce cardiovascular disease."

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CDC - NIOSH Publications and Products - Current Intelligence Bulletin 65: Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers (2013-145)

CDC - NIOSH Publications and Products - Current Intelligence Bulletin 65: Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers (2013-145) | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"These results indicate that MWCNT can increase the risk of cancer in mice exposed to a known carcinogen. The study did not indicate that MWCNTs alone cause cancer in mice. This research is an important step in our understanding of the hazards associated with MWCNT, but before we can determine whether MWCNT pose an occupational cancer risk, we need more information about workplace exposures, the types and nature of MWCNT being used in the workplace, and how that compares to the material used in this study. Research is underway at NIOSH to learn more about worker exposures and the potential occupational health risks associated with exposure to MWCNT and other types of CNTs and CNFs. As results from ongoing research become available, NIOSH will reassess its recommendations for CNT and CNF and make appropriate revisions as needed. NIOSH urges employers to share this information with workers and customers. NIOSH also requests that professional and trade associations and labor organizations inform their members about the potential hazards of CNT and CNF."

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Electronic Cigarettes Contain Higher Levels of Toxic Metal Nanopartices Than Tobacco Smoke

Electronic Cigarettes Contain Higher Levels of Toxic Metal Nanopartices Than Tobacco Smoke | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it
A concerning new study found that the aerosol from electronic cigarettes contains higher levels of measurable nanoparticle heavy metals than conventional tobacco smoke.
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Study Looks at Particles Used in Food

Study Looks at Particles Used in Food | Nanotechnology & Health | Scoop.it

"Their small size allows nanoparticles to go places in the body where larger particles cannot and enter cells. They have been found in the blood stream after ingestion and inhalation, and while research on their health effects is limited, studies have shown them to have deleterious effects on mice and cells."

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CAMS used to determine biological effects of silica nanoparticles

"However, as the potential uses of SiNPs have increased, research looking into the biological effects and toxicity has not kept up to speed. Studies have shown that inhalation of microcrystalline silica may be linked with the pulmonary disease silicosis in humans. Chronic inhalation studies in rats have been associated with pulmonary fibrosis and cancer, and exposure to microscale amporphous silica has been linked to inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema. A complete understanding of the size, shape, and composition-dependent interactions of SiNPs with biological systems is lacking, largely due to suitable analytical methods.

 

The Livermore PK analysis showed that SiNPs were rapidly cleared from the circulatory system (the "central compartment" in PK models) and were distributed to various body tissues, where they persisted over the eight-week time course of the study, raising questions about the potential for bioaccumulation and associated long-term effects."

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