Nanotechnology
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Nanotechnology Could Help Detect Cancer Cells

Nanotechnology Could Help Detect Cancer Cells | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it
"Nano-flares" may make it easier for doctors to diagnose breast cancer before it spreads to neighboring tissue.
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Researchers at Northwestern University express that physicians are able to spot cancerous red flags on an early cellular level using the new Nanotechnology 'Nano-Flares'.

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Daryl Nazareth's curator insight, March 28, 2014 7:46 AM

Using Nanotechnology in Medical procedures.

 

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Stanford's touch-sensitive plastic skin heals itself

Stanford's touch-sensitive plastic skin heals itself | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it

The winner advance could lead to new smarter prosthetics or resilient personal electronics that repair themselves.


Via Luís Bastos
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Stanford chemists working with engineers have successfully created the first synthetic materials that is capable of both healing itself and is sensitive to touch. The outlook on this new technology aims for smart electronics that can repair themselves. 

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Nanotube-based sensors can be implanted under the skin for a year

Nanotube-based sensors can be implanted under the skin for a year | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it
Nanotube-based sensors can be implanted under the skin for a year (RT @Nanowerk: Nanotube-based sensors can be implanted under the skin for a year http://t.co/f55ijF7jWV #nanotechnology)...

Via Centro de Quimica
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By allowing researchers to monitor Nitric Oxide (NO) molecules in living animals it will provide us with better understanding of cancerous cells, all of which can now be achieved with a Nanotube-based sensor. 

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Carbon nanotubes could be hiding bits of the universe

Carbon nanotubes could be hiding bits of the universe | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it
Carbon nanotubes can create a 'perfect black' that visually wipes out a dimension, making 3D objects look 2D. When draped over a substance, a thin coat of them renders the object invisible by absorbing all the light coming in.

Via Sakis Koukouvis, Laura Sanchez
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Carbon Nanotubes are being created that can visually wipe out a dimension and create a 'perfect black'. Minor invisibility may not be a thing of science fiction for much longer. Similar substances are suspected to account for "missing matter" in the universe. 

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Nanotechnology Leaps Forward With New Cancer Drug - WebProNews

Nanotechnology Leaps Forward With New Cancer Drug - WebProNews | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it
AFPNanotechnology Leaps Forward With New Cancer DrugWebProNewsBy Mike Tuttle · 13 hours ago · Leave a Comment A team of scientists, engineers and physicians have found promising effects of a first-in-class targeted cancer drug called BIND-014 in...

Via Ricardo Abreu
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Nano medicine taking steps to potentially revolutionise  cancer treatment technologies. 

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Laboratory Equipment - Are Nanomaterials Safe or Not?

Laboratory Equipment - Are Nanomaterials Safe or Not? | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it
Man-made nanomaterials have been researched for the past thirty years and increasingly used in commercial manufactured products over the past decade.

Via Ricardo Abreu
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Engineered Nanomaterial safety concerns becoming a central point of discussion.

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Pictures: Nano "Flowers" Created in Lab - National Geographic News - National Geographic

Pictures: Nano "Flowers" Created in Lab - National Geographic News - National Geographic | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it
National Geographic Pictures: Nano "Flowers" Created in Lab - National Geographic News National Geographic A flower fit for a Lilliputian maiden, this microscopic "rose" was grown in a laboratory at Harvard University using a solution of chemicals...

Via CloudScope
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"Rose" grown on a molecular scale in a Harvard Lab. 

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‘Nanocable’ could be big boon for energy storage

‘Nanocable’ could be big boon for energy storage | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it

Thanks to a little serendipity, Rice University scientists have created a tiny coaxial cable that is about a thousand times smaller than a human hair and has higher capacitance than previously reported microcapacitors. This nanocable was produced with techniques pioneered in the nascent graphene research field and could be used to build next-generation energy-storage systems. It could also find use in wiring up components of lab-on-a-chip processors, but its discovery is owed partly to chance. “We didn’t expect to create this when we started,” said study co-author Jun Lou, associate professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Rice. “At the outset, we were just curious to see what would happen electrically and mechanically if we took small copper wires known as interconnects and covered them with a thin layer of carbon.”

 

The tiny coaxial cable is remarkably similar in makeup to the ones that carry cable television signals into millions of homes and offices. The heart of the cable is a solid copper wire that is surrounded by a thin sheath of insulating copper oxide. A third layer, another conductor, surrounds that. In the case of TV cables, the third layer is copper again, but in the nanocable it is a thin layer of carbon measuring just a few atoms thick. The coax nanocable is about 100 nanometers, or 100 billionths of a meter, wide.

 

While the coaxial cable is a mainstay of broadband telecommunications, the three-layer, metal-insulator-metal structure can also be used to build energy-storage devices called capacitors. Unlike batteries, which rely on chemical reactions to both store and supply electricity, capacitors use electrical fields. A capacitor contains two electrical conductors, one negative and the other positive, that are separated by thin layer of insulation. Separating the oppositely charged conductors creates an electrical potential, and that potential increases as the separated charges increase and as the distance between them – occupied by the insulating layer — decreases. The proportion between the charge density and the separating distance is known as capacitance, and it’s the standard measure of efficiency of a capacitor.

 

Building entire multiple-component devices on single nanowires is a promising strategy for miniaturizing electronic applications. Here we demonstrate a single nanowire capacitor with a coaxial asymmetric Cu-Cu2O-C structure, fabricated using a two-step chemical reaction and vapour deposition method. The capacitance measured from a single nanowire device corresponds to ~140 μF cm−2, exceeding previous reported values for metal–insulator–metal micro-capacitors and is more than one order of magnitude higher than what is predicted by classical electrostatics. Quantum mechanical calculations indicate that this unusually high capacitance may be attributed to a negative quantum capacitance of the dielectric–metal interface, enhanced significantly at the nanoscale.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, CloudScope
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Next-Generation energy storage utilizing nanotechnology. 

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'Cyborg Tissue' Created - Harvard Crimson

'Cyborg Tissue' Created - Harvard Crimson | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it

Cyborg tissue is becoming more than fiction thanks to research by a team of Harvard and MIT scientists who have engineered nano-sized electrical wire scaffolds that can be placed inside living tissue. It’s a technology they hope will become a fundamental part of drug development and aid in replacing damaged tissue in the human body.


Via Luís Bastos
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Science Fiction is being transformed into reality as a research team out of Harvard & MIT creates nano-sized electrical wires capable of being placed inside living tissues. 

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Advancements in Nanotechnology herald new industrial revolution - nation.lk - The Nation Newspaper

Advancements in Nanotechnology herald new industrial revolution - nation.lk - The Nation Newspaper | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it
nation.lk - The Nation Newspaper Advancements in Nanotechnology herald new industrial revolution nation.lk - The Nation Newspaper A new wave of industrial revolution is being created at the labs at Sri Lanka's first Nanotechnology and Science Park...

Via Centro de Quimica
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Nanotechnology set to become a powerhouse industry. 

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New Material Allows Electronics to Stretch - Mashable

New Material Allows Electronics to Stretch - Mashable | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it
New Material Allows Electronics to StretchMashableSeokwoo Jeon, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, led the research, which appears in the June 26 issue of Nature...

Via Razvan Liviu, Laura Sanchez
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By combining a three dimensional polymer nanostructure with metal, many electronics are not far from being able to stretch and become flexible thanks to South Korean researchers.   

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Peripheral Nerve Repair: Use of Nanotechnology and Tissue engineering

Peripheral Nerve Repair: Use of Nanotechnology and Tissue engineering | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it
Author: Tilda Barliya PhD Peripheral nerve lacerations are common injuries and often cause long lasting disability (1a) due to pain, paralyzed muscles and loss of adequate sensory feedback from the...

Via Luís Bastos
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Nanotechnology and Tissue engineering pairing up to combat leading nerve damages and assisting to make recovery from said injuries all the more swift and effective. 

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Carlos Garcia Pando's curator insight, April 6, 2013 6:42 AM

Peripheral nerve repair is a growing field with substantial progress being made in more effective repairs. Nanotechnology and biomedical engineering have made significant contributions; from surgical instrumentation to the development of tissue engineered grafting substitutes. 

Rescooped by Andrew O'Rourke from NanoScience
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Nanotechnology-equipped cell phones detect harmful airborne substances - Nanowerk LLC

Nanotechnology-equipped cell phones detect harmful airborne substances - Nanowerk LLC | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it
Nanowerk LLCNanotechnology-equipped cell phones detect harmful airborne substancesNanowerk LLC(Nanowerk News) The lab of a University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering professor was named on Tuesday, April 3 after Innovation Economy...

Via Ricardo Abreu
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Nanotechnology commercialised as professor equips a mobile phone to detect airborne substances. Agriculture and the Military are being seen as large target industries. 

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Rescooped by Andrew O'Rourke from Nano Technology
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Scientists see nanoparticles form larger structures in real time

Scientists see nanoparticles form larger structures in real time | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it

The scientists exposed a tiny liquid “cell” or pouch that contained gold nanoparticles covered with a positively charged coating to an intense beam of electrons generated with a transmission electron microscope. Some of the electrons that penetrated the outside of the cell became trapped in the fluid medium in the cell. These “hydrated” electrons attracted the positively charged nanoparticles, which in time reduced the intensity of charge of the positive coating.


Via Michele Diodati, CloudScope
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Scientists witness the behavior of nano particles in real time. Furthering knowledge of basic functionality will greatly assist researchers with incorporating the technology in a range of applications for the future.

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Carbon-based nanotechnology materials for biomedical engineering

Carbon-based nanotechnology materials for biomedical engineering | Nanotechnology | Scoop.it
Carbon nanomaterials such as nanotubes or graphene not only are widely researched for their potential uses in industrial applications, they also are of great interest to biomedical engineers working on nanotechnology ...

Via CloudScope
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Carbon-Based Nanomaterials (CBN) shaping the future of Biomedical Engineering. 

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