Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications
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Strange Biology Inspires the Best New Materials | Wired Science | Wired.com

Strange Biology Inspires the Best New Materials | Wired Science | Wired.com | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it

From the shiny, strong nacre that gives abalone shells an unbreakable, opaline sheen, to the goopy mix of proteins fired by a velvet worm that solidify and snare prey upon impact, nature is packed with inspiration for scientists designing new...


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Novel method to monitor material changes in fusion reactors developed - Science Recorder

Novel method to monitor material changes in fusion reactors developed - Science Recorder | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it
Science Recorder Novel method to monitor material changes in fusion reactors developed Science Recorder According to a November 13 news release from the American Physical Society, researchers at MIT's Plasma Science and Fusion Center have...
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Parasite Inspires Surgical Patch

Parasite Inspires Surgical Patch | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it

By mimicking a technique used by an intestinal parasite of fish, researchers have developed a flexible patch studded with microneedles that holds skin grafts in place more strongly than surgical staples do. After burrowing into the walls of a fish's intestines, the spiny-headed worm Pomphorhynchus laevis inflates its proboscis to better embed itself in the soft tissue. In the new patch (sample shown in main image), the stiff polystyrene core of the 700-micrometer-tall needles (inset) penetrates the tissue; then a thin hydrogel coating on the tip of each needle—a coating based on the material in disposable diapers that expands when it gets wet—swells to help anchor the patch in place. In tests using skin grafts, adhesion strength of the patch was more than three times higher than surgical staples, the researchers report online today in Nature Communications. Because the patch doesn't depend on chemical adhesives for its gripping power, there's less chance for patients to have an allergic reaction. And because the microneedles are about one-quarter the length of typical surgical staples, the patches cause less tissue damage when they're removed, the researchers contend. Besides holding grafts in place, the patch could be used to hold the sides of a wound or an incision together—even, in theory, ones inside the body if a slowly dissolving version of the patch can be developed. Moreover, the researchers say, the hydrogel coating holds promise as a way to deliver proteins, drugs, or other therapeutic substances to patients.


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The Science & Education team's curator insight, April 19, 2013 12:20 AM

As someone who has sat and removed surgical staples this is a nice piece of technology

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Nanoparticle disguised as blood cell fights bacterial infections

Nanoparticle disguised as blood cell fights bacterial infections | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it

A nanoparticle wrapped in a red blood cell membrane can remove toxins from the body and could be used to fight bacterial infections, according to research published today in Nature Nanotechnology.

 

The results demonstrate that the nanoparticles could be used to neutralize toxins produced by many bacteria, including some that are antibiotic-resistant, and could counteract the toxicity of venom from a snake or scorpion attack, says Liangfang Zhang, a professor of nanoengineering at the University of California, San Diego. Zhang led the research.

 

The “nanosponges” work by targeting so-called pore-forming toxins, which kill cells by poking holes in them. One of the most common classes of protein toxins in nature, pore-forming toxins are secreted by many types of bacteria, includingStaphylococcus aureus, of which antibiotic-resistant strains, called MRSA, are endemic in hospitals worldwide and cause tens of thousands of deaths annually. They are also present in many types of animal venom.

 

There are a range of existing therapies designed to target the molecular structure of pore-forming toxins and disable their cell-killing functions. But they must be customized for different diseases and conditions, and there are over 80 families of these harmful proteins, each with a different structure. Using the new nanosponge therapy, says Zhang, “we can neutralize every single one, regardless of their molecular structure.”

 

Zhang and his colleagues wrapped real red blood cell membranes around biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles. A single red blood cell supplies enough membrane material to produce over 3,000 nanosponges, each around 85 nanometers (a nanometer is a billionth of a meter) in diameter. Since red blood cells are a primary target of pore-forming toxins, the nanosponges act as decoys once in the bloodstream, absorbing the damaging proteins and neutralizing their toxicity. And because they are so small, the nanosponges will vastly outnumber the real red blood cells in the system, says Zhang. This means they have a much higher chance of interacting with and absorbing toxins, and thus can divert the toxins away from their natural targets.

 

In animal tests, the researchers showed that the new therapy greatly increased the survival rate of mice given a lethal dose of one of the most potent pore-forming toxins. Liver biopsies several days following the injection revealed no damage, indicating that the nanosponges, along with the sequestered toxins, were safely digested after accumulating in the liver.


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Black Nanoparticles Key to Clean Energy Photocatalysis - Laboratory Equipment

Black Nanoparticles Key to Clean Energy Photocatalysis - Laboratory Equipment | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it
Laboratory Equipment Black Nanoparticles Key to Clean Energy Photocatalysis Laboratory Equipment Berkeley Lab's Samuel Mao used disorder engineering to transform titanium nanocrystals into highly efficient solar hydrogen A unique atomic-scale...
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Advances in first-principles computational materials science

Advances in first-principles computational materials science Dr. Elif Ertekin, Mechanical Science & Engineering, University of Illinois Oct 24, 2012 12:00 pm...
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WO2013051895A2 METAL OXIDE SEMICONDUCTOR-NANOCARBON CONSOLIDATED CORE-SHELL QUANTUM DOTS AND ULTRAVIOLET PHOTOVOLTAIC CELL USING IT AND FABRICATION PROCESS THEREOF

WO2013051895A2 METAL OXIDE SEMICONDUCTOR-NANOCARBON CONSOLIDATED CORE-SHELL QUANTUM DOTS AND ULTRAVIOLET PHOTOVOLTAIC CELL USING IT AND FABRICATION PROCESS THEREOF | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it
WIPO patent: Disclosed is a method of preparing metal oxide semiconductor-nanocarbon core-shell consolidated quantum dots by chemically linking nanocarbon having superior electrical properties to a metal oxide semiconductor and a method of...
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Controlling Nanocrystals | April 15, 2013 Issue - Vol. 91 Issue 15 | Chemical & Engineering News

Controlling Nanocrystals | April 15, 2013 Issue - Vol. 91 Issue 15 | Chemical & Engineering News | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it
#UFO4UBlogTech Controlling Nanocrystals | Chemical & Engineering News http://t.co/ydLufpkNAJ
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Integration Of Photonic And Electronic Components

Integration Of Photonic And Electronic Components | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it
Better integration of photonic and electronic components in nanoscale devices may now become possible, thanks to work by Khuong Phuong Ong and Hong-Son Chu from the A*A*STAR Institute of High Perfo...
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10 Mind-Bending Materials You Won't Believe Exist Here And There

10 Mind-Bending Materials You Won't Believe Exist Here And There | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it
  10 Mind-Bending Materials You Won’t Believe Exist 10 Mind-Bending Materials You Won’t Believe Exist Whether it be gallium or self-healing concrete, there are even more mind-bending materials that actually exist today.
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Findings on Fullerenes Reported by Investigators at Institute of Materials Science - HispanicBusiness.com

Findings on Fullerenes Reported by Investigators at Institute of Materials Science
HispanicBusiness.com
By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Science Letter -- Research findings on Fullerenes are discussed in a new report.
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World’s smallest blood monitoring implant tells your smartphone when you’re about to have a heart attack

World’s smallest blood monitoring implant tells your smartphone when you’re about to have a heart attack | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it

A team of scientists Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, has developed the world's smallest medical implant to monitor critical chemicals in the blood, and communicates with a smartphone.


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NCB Materials Science News

NCB Materials Science News | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it
NCB Materials Science News, by Nicolas Clavijo B: Material Science News around the world. (NCB Materials Science News is out!
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Innovation & Materials Science Institute

Introduction to the mission of IMSI, with all major partners speaking. ([VIDEO] Innovation & Materials Science Institute #IMSI at Eastman Business Park.
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Quantum Dots « Futiquity

Quantum Dots « Futiquity | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it
An explanation of Quantum Dots WITHOUT math or diagrams. Honest. Impress your friends! This We Give The World. http://t.co/uRLBEXialj
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Evolving Soft Robots with Multiple Materials (muscle, bone, etc.)

More videos: http://jeffclune.com/videos.html Here we evolve the bodies of soft robots made of multiple materials (muscle, bone, & support tissue) to move qu...
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Nanotechnology explained: Nanowires and nanotubes

Nanotechnology explained: Nanowires and nanotubes | Nanoscale Assemblies and their Biomedical Applications | Scoop.it
Nanowerk News) Nanowires and nanotubes, slender structures that are  only a few billionths of a meter in diameter but many thousands or millions of  times longer, have become hot materials in recen...
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