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Natural nanocrystals shown to strengthen concrete

Natural nanocrystals shown to strengthen concrete | NanoCellulose | Scoop.it
Cellulose nanocrystals derived from industrial byproducts have been shown to increase the strength of concrete, representing a potential renewable additive to improve the ubiquitous construction material. The cellulose nanocrystals could be refined from byproducts generated in the paper, bioenergy, agriculture and pulp industries.
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Cellulose nanocrystals possible “green” wonder material

Cellulose nanocrystals possible “green” wonder material | NanoCellulose | Scoop.it

"This material is abundant, renewable and waste of the food industry" 

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The cellulose nanocrystals represent a potential green alternative to carbon nanotubes for reinforcing materials such as polymers and concrete. Applications for biomaterials made from the cellulose nanocrystals might include biodegradable plastic bags, textiles and wound dressings; flexible batteries made from electrically conductive paper; new drug-delivery technologies; transparent flexible displays for electronic devices; special filters for water purification; new types of sensors; and computer memory.


http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10570-013-0071-8

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A low cost way to turn wood into NANOCELLULOSE

A low cost way to turn wood into NANOCELLULOSE | NanoCellulose | Scoop.it

There is no expensive chemistry required and, most significantly, the chemicals used can be easily recycled and reused without generating large quantities of waste water

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

“Nanocellulose, extracted from wood fibres, has a number of unique optical, barrier and strength properties,” said project coordinator Math Jennekens, R&D Director at Sappi Europe. “Unlike other lightweight, high-strength materials based on fossil fuels it is completely sustainable, making it very desirable as a new material for various industrial and transport applications.”

The versatile material has previously been produced by intensively processing wood pulp to release ultra-small, or ‘nano’ cellulose fibers – each so small that 2,000 could fit inside the width of a single strand of human hair.

But the Edinburgh Napier research team say they have been able to drastically reduce the amount of energy needed to power the process, as well as the need for expensive chemicals.

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