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Founder, Prof. Stephen Chou to Give Tutorial on Nanoimprint at IEEE Nano 2013 - San Francisco Chronicle (press release)

Founder, Prof. Stephen Chou to Give Tutorial on Nanoimprint at IEEE Nano 2013 - San Francisco Chronicle (press release) | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Founder, Prof. Stephen Chou to Give Tutorial on Nanoimprint at IEEE Nano 2013
San Francisco Chronicle (press release)
Nanoimprint is impacting both R&D and manufacturing in a broad range of industries, from ICs, nano/micro optical devices (e.g.
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Nanotechnology could lead to better quality of life for type 1 diabetes patients - Diabetes.co.uk

Nanotechnology could lead to better quality of life for type 1 diabetes patients - Diabetes.co.uk | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Nanotechnology could lead to better quality of life for type 1 diabetes patients
Diabetes.co.uk
Injectable nanoparticles developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are designed to replace the function of islet cells in the pancreas.
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Harvard researchers grow nano-landscape - Boston Globe

Harvard researchers grow nano-landscape - Boston Globe | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Boston Globe
Harvard researchers grow nano-landscape
Boston Globe
Scientists toiling in this invisible realm are putting their new techniques to aesthetically pleasing purposes to show they work -- and capture the public's imagination.

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‘Nanocable’ could be big boon for energy storage

‘Nanocable’ could be big boon for energy storage | Nano Technology | Scoop.it

Thanks to a little serendipity, Rice University scientists have created a tiny coaxial cable that is about a thousand times smaller than a human hair and has higher capacitance than previously reported microcapacitors. This nanocable was produced with techniques pioneered in the nascent graphene research field and could be used to build next-generation energy-storage systems. It could also find use in wiring up components of lab-on-a-chip processors, but its discovery is owed partly to chance. “We didn’t expect to create this when we started,” said study co-author Jun Lou, associate professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Rice. “At the outset, we were just curious to see what would happen electrically and mechanically if we took small copper wires known as interconnects and covered them with a thin layer of carbon.”

 

The tiny coaxial cable is remarkably similar in makeup to the ones that carry cable television signals into millions of homes and offices. The heart of the cable is a solid copper wire that is surrounded by a thin sheath of insulating copper oxide. A third layer, another conductor, surrounds that. In the case of TV cables, the third layer is copper again, but in the nanocable it is a thin layer of carbon measuring just a few atoms thick. The coax nanocable is about 100 nanometers, or 100 billionths of a meter, wide.

 

While the coaxial cable is a mainstay of broadband telecommunications, the three-layer, metal-insulator-metal structure can also be used to build energy-storage devices called capacitors. Unlike batteries, which rely on chemical reactions to both store and supply electricity, capacitors use electrical fields. A capacitor contains two electrical conductors, one negative and the other positive, that are separated by thin layer of insulation. Separating the oppositely charged conductors creates an electrical potential, and that potential increases as the separated charges increase and as the distance between them – occupied by the insulating layer — decreases. The proportion between the charge density and the separating distance is known as capacitance, and it’s the standard measure of efficiency of a capacitor.

 

Building entire multiple-component devices on single nanowires is a promising strategy for miniaturizing electronic applications. Here we demonstrate a single nanowire capacitor with a coaxial asymmetric Cu-Cu2O-C structure, fabricated using a two-step chemical reaction and vapour deposition method. The capacitance measured from a single nanowire device corresponds to ~140 μF cm−2, exceeding previous reported values for metal–insulator–metal micro-capacitors and is more than one order of magnitude higher than what is predicted by classical electrostatics. Quantum mechanical calculations indicate that this unusually high capacitance may be attributed to a negative quantum capacitance of the dielectric–metal interface, enhanced significantly at the nanoscale.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Andrew O'Rourke's curator insight, March 28, 2014 12:00 AM

Next-Generation energy storage utilizing nanotechnology. 

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New 3 Dimensional Tissue Matrices « EQALIX

New 3 Dimensional Tissue Matrices « EQALIX | Nano Technology | Scoop.it

Plant-protein based nano-fiber scaffolds for Wound Healing

This technology facilitates creation of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds (TTS) that can either be seeded with specific cells with the intent to form a particular target tissue (for instance liver tissue, lung tissue or nerve tissue), or can be implanted without cell seeding into a target tissue: for instance, connective tissue defects that need to be filled (e.g. in lung diseases leading to the formation of large connective tissue defects,) or in other uses, where augmentation of target tissues are desired.


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Injectable nano-network controls blood sugar in diabetics for days at a time

Injectable nano-network controls blood sugar in diabetics for days at a time | Nano Technology | Scoop.it

In a promising development for diabetes treatment, researchers have developed a network of nanoscale particles that can be injected into the body and release insulin when blood-sugar levels rise, maintaining normal blood sugar levels for more than a week in animal-based laboratory tests. The work was done by researchers at North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Children's Hospital Boston.

 

The new, injectable nano-network is composed of a mixture containing nanoparticles with a solid core of insulin, modified dextran and glucose oxidase enzymes. When the enzymes are exposed to high glucose levels they effectively convert glucose into gluconic acid, which breaks down the modified dextran and releases the insulin. The insulin then brings the glucose levels under control. The gluconic acid and dextran are fully biocompatible and dissolve in the body.

 

Each of these nanoparticle cores is given either a positively charged or negatively charged biocompatible coating. The positively charged coatings are made of chitosan (a material normally found in shrimp shells), while the negatively charged coatings are made of alginate (a material normally found in seaweed).

 

When the solution of coated nanoparticles is mixed together, the positively and negatively charged coatings are attracted to each other to form a "nano-network." Once injected into the subcutaneous layer of the skin, the nano-network holds the nanoparticles together and prevents them from dispersing throughout the body. Both the nano-network and the coatings are porous, allowing blood -- and blood sugar -- to reach the nanoparticle cores.

 

"This technology effectively creates a 'closed-loop' system that mimics the activity of the pancreas in a healthy person, releasing insulin in response to glucose level changes," Gu says. "This has the potential to improve the health and quality of life of diabetes patients."

Gu's research team is currently in discussions to move the technology into clinical trials for use in humans.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Masdar Institute to gather nanotechnology experts in Abu Dhabi - AME Info (press release)

Masdar Institute to gather nanotechnology experts in Abu Dhabi - AME Info (press release) | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Masdar Institute to gather nanotechnology experts in Abu Dhabi AME Info (press release) Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, an independent, research-driven graduate-level university focused on advanced energy and sustainable technologies,...
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NanoMarkets newest analysis of smart lighting sees significant long-term opportunity

NanoMarkets newest analysis of smart lighting sees significant long-term opportunity | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Global LEDs/OLEDs - the industry publication dedicated to manufacturing with LEDs and OLEDs

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Scientists see nanoparticles form larger structures in real time

Scientists see nanoparticles form larger structures in real time | Nano Technology | Scoop.it

The scientists exposed a tiny liquid “cell” or pouch that contained gold nanoparticles covered with a positively charged coating to an intense beam of electrons generated with a transmission electron microscope. Some of the electrons that penetrated the outside of the cell became trapped in the fluid medium in the cell. These “hydrated” electrons attracted the positively charged nanoparticles, which in time reduced the intensity of charge of the positive coating.


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Andrew O'Rourke's curator insight, March 28, 2014 12:15 AM

Scientists witness the behavior of nano particles in real time. Furthering knowledge of basic functionality will greatly assist researchers with incorporating the technology in a range of applications for the future.

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Nanotechnology could help fight diabetes - MIT News

Nanotechnology could help fight diabetes - MIT News | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Nanotechnology could help fight diabetes
MIT News
Anderson is the senior author of a paper describing the new system in a recent issue of the journal ACS Nano. Lead author of the paper is Zhen Gu, a former postdoc in Anderson's lab.
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Phys.Org Mobile: Researchers report first fully integrated artificial photosynthesis nanosystem

Phys.Org Mobile: Researchers report first fully integrated artificial photosynthesis nanosystem | Nano Technology | Scoop.it

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Power Grab Trumps Nanotechnology in Putin's Russia - Bloomberg

Power Grab Trumps Nanotechnology in Putin's Russia
Bloomberg
The projects, known as Rusnano and Skolkovo, were meant to propel Russia's raw-material economy into the technology age.
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Cambridge Nanotherm heats up with £500k prototype manufacturing plant

Cambridge Nanotherm heats up with £500k prototype manufacturing plant | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
A company that has developed a technology it says can lengthen the lifespan of LEDs by up to four times at no extra cost is to invest over £500k into a prototype manufacturing plant in Cambridge.
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How nanotechnology could keep your heart healthy - News@Northeastern

How nanotechnology could keep your heart healthy - News@Northeastern | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
News@Northeastern
How nanotechnology could keep your heart healthy
News@Northeastern
Professor Thomas Webster's Northeastern Nanomedicine Lab covers a range of topics from cardiac disease to antimicrobial materials.
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Milton Jon's curator insight, March 18, 2015 5:44 AM

Herring, A. (2013). How nanotechnology could keep your heart healthy. news @ Northeastern. Retrieved 18 March 2015

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Carbon in a Twirl: The Science Behind a Self-Assembled Nano-Carbon Helix - Science Daily (press release)

Carbon in a Twirl: The Science Behind a Self-Assembled Nano-Carbon Helix - Science Daily (press release) | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Carbon in a Twirl: The Science Behind a Self-Assembled Nano-Carbon Helix
Science Daily (press release)
Their method might lead the way to the formation of more complex nano-networks.
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DNA-Guided Assembly Yields Novel Ribbon-Like Nanostructures

DNA-Guided Assembly Yields Novel Ribbon-Like Nanostructures | Nano Technology | Scoop.it

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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, May 17, 2013 6:21 PM

*New Mechanism of Self-Assembly from DNA-Tethered Nanorods*

by
Karen McNulty Walsh, Peter Genzer

"Approach could be useful in fabricating new kinds of materials with engineered properties

UPTON, NY—Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have discovered that DNA "linker" strands coax nano-sized rods to line up in a way unlike any other spontaneous arrangement of rod-shaped objects. The arrangement—with the rods forming "rungs" on ladder-like ribbons linked by multiple DNA strands—results from the collective interactions of the flexible DNA tethers and may be unique to the nanoscale. The research, described in a paper published online in ACS Nano, a journal of the American Chemical Society, could result in the fabrication of new nanostructured materials with desired properties. "This is a completely new mechanism of self-assembly that does not have direct analogs in the realm of molecular or microscale systems," said Brookhaven physicist Oleg Gang, lead author on the paper, who conducted the bulk of the research at the Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)...."


http://1.usa.gov/112nMrZ

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Nanotechnology Australia

Nanotechnology Australia | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Nanotechnology website with basics, issues, news and information. Here you can learn about the nanotechnology and develop the knowledge on Nanomedicine, Nanoelectronics, Nanotubes, Nanoscale Materials, Nanomechanics , Nanophotonics & Nanocrystal.
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Carbon-based nanotechnology materials for biomedical engineering

Carbon-based nanotechnology materials for biomedical engineering | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Carbon nanomaterials such as nanotubes or graphene not only are widely researched for their potential uses in industrial applications, they also are of great interest to biomedical engineers working on nanotechnology ...
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Andrew O'Rourke's curator insight, March 28, 2014 12:04 AM

Carbon-Based Nanomaterials (CBN) shaping the future of Biomedical Engineering. 

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Big drugmakers think small with nanomedicine deals

Big drugmakers think small with nanomedicine deals | Nano Technology | Scoop.it

Is nanomedicine the next big thing? A growing number of top drug companies seem to think so. The ability to encapsulate potent drugs in tiny particles measuring billionths of a metre in diameter is opening up new options for super-accurate drug delivery, increasing precision hits at the site of disease with, hopefully, fewer side effects.

 

Three deals struck this year by privately held Bind Therapeutics, together worth nearly $1 billion if experiments are successful, highlight a new interest in using such tiny carriers to deliver drug payloads to specific locations in the body.

 

U.S.-based Bind is one of several biotechnology firms that are luring large pharmaceutical makers with a range of smart drug nanotechnologies, notably against cancer.

 

And nanomedicine is also being put to work in diagnosis, with tiny particles used to improve imaging in scanners, as well as rapidly detecting some serious infections.

 

In future, researchers hope to combine both treatment and diagnostics in a new approach dubbed "theranostics" that would allow doctors to monitor patients via their medicines.

 

After much hype but limited clinical success, scientists in the nanotechnology field finally see a turning point. "We have been hearing about the promise of nanomedicine for a long time, but it is now really starting to move," said Dan Peer, who runs a nanomedicine laboratory at Tel Aviv University.

 

"There is a new level of confidence in this approach among the big pharmaceutical companies ... We will see more and more products in clinical testing over the next few years and I think that is very exciting."

Nanoparticles made of polymers, gold and even graphene - a newly-discovered form of carbon - are now in various stages of development. In cancer alone, 117 drugs are being assessed using nanoparticle formulations, though most have yet to be tried on patients, according to Thomson Reuters Pharma data.

 

Other potential applications include treatments for inflammatory disorders, heart and brain diseases, and pain.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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NanoFinder: explore nanotechnology applications in each industrial sector! - Nanotechnology News (press release)

NanoFinder: explore nanotechnology applications in each industrial sector! - Nanotechnology News (press release) | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Nanotechnology News (press release)
NanoFinder: explore nanotechnology applications in each industrial sector!
Nanotechnology News (press release)
As a Key Enabling Technology, nanotechnology is a source of growth and jobs in all industrial sectors.
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TP-Link TL-WN725N Nano WiFi Adapter v2.0 Raspberry Pi Driver » pi3g Blog

TP-Link TL-WN725N Nano WiFi Adapter v2.0 Raspberry Pi Driver » pi3g Blog | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Thanks TPLink for changing TL-WN725N's chip without changing the part #. Fortunately RPi hackers came to the rescue: http://t.co/7fKTPa1tk9

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Phys.Org Mobile: Scientists discovering new uses for tiny carbon nanotubes


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How nanotechnology could keep your heart healthy - Nanowerk - Nanowerk

How nanotechnology could keep your heart healthy - Nanowerk - Nanowerk | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
Nanowerk
How nanotechnology could keep your heart healthy - Nanowerk
Nanowerk
How nanotechnology could keep your heart healthy.
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Pictures: Nano "Flowers" Created in Lab - National Geographic News - National Geographic

Pictures: Nano "Flowers" Created in Lab - National Geographic News - National Geographic | Nano Technology | Scoop.it
National Geographic Pictures: Nano "Flowers" Created in Lab - National Geographic News National Geographic A flower fit for a Lilliputian maiden, this microscopic "rose" was grown in a laboratory at Harvard University using a solution of chemicals...
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Andrew O'Rourke's curator insight, March 28, 2014 12:09 AM

"Rose" grown on a molecular scale in a Harvard Lab. 

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Memristors: Nanoelectronic Components

Memristors: Nanoelectronic Components | Nano Technology | Scoop.it

Memristors, or memory resistors, are a kind of passive circuit element which can be used to create circuits which behave in a similar way to neurons in the brain.


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