my universe
1.6K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Norman Warthmann from Food and Nutrition
onto my universe
Scoop.it!

India's grain mountain grows despite push for exports

* June 1 wheat, rice stocks seen at 100 mln tonnes* India only has space to store 47 mln tonnes* Government to push for more wheat exports, facesbottlenecks* Bumper harvest risks rotting when stored

Via Jeremy Cherfas
more...
Jeremy Cherfas's curator insight, March 5, 2013 6:24 AM

This is simply staggering. While rich countries worry about wasting mis-shapen cucumbers or ugly apples, India is facing the waste of another record year's harvest of wheat and rice.

my universe
Snippets on life, science, politics and other interactions
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

Associations among Wine Grape Microbiome, Metabolome, and Fermentation Behavior Suggest Microbial Contribution to Regional Wine Characteristics

Norman Warthmann's insight:
Finally!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Norman Warthmann from Plants and Microbes
Scoop.it!

bioRxiv: Emergence of wheat blast in Bangladesh was caused by a South American lineage of Magnaporthe oryzae (2016)

bioRxiv: Emergence of wheat blast in Bangladesh was caused by a South American lineage of Magnaporthe oryzae (2016) | my universe | Scoop.it

In February 2016, a new fungal disease was spotted in wheat fields across eight districts in Bangladesh. The epidemic spread to an estimated 15,741 hectares, about 16% of cultivated wheat area in Bangladesh, with yield losses reaching up to 100%. Within weeks of the onset of the epidemic, we performed transcriptome sequencing of symptomatic leaf samples collected directly from Bangladeshi fields. Population genomics analyses revealed that the outbreak was caused by a wheat-infecting South American lineage of the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. We show that genomic surveillance can be rapidly applied to monitor plant disease outbreaks and provide valuable information regarding the identity and origin of the infectious agent.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
more...
Lynne Reuber's curator insight, June 20, 10:53 AM
Molecular epidemiology for plant pathology
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

Biden unveiling public database for clinical data on cancer

Biden unveiling public database for clinical data on cancer | my universe | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Joe Biden unveiled a public database for clinical data on cancer on Monday that aims to help researchers and doctors better tailor new treatments to individuals. Since taking on the cancer issue last year, Biden has repeatedly argued that confining data within institutions has hampered cancer research, with scientists and medical companies reluctant to share proprietary information. [...] cancer research institutions have significant data-sharing arrangements in place, although Biden and other critics say it's too limited and not happening early enough in the process.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Norman Warthmann from Sustainable agriculture
Scoop.it!

Modern Industrial Agriculture Is Incompatible With Nature—We Need a New Paradigm Based on Ecology

Modern Industrial Agriculture Is Incompatible With Nature—We Need a New Paradigm Based on Ecology | my universe | Scoop.it
Annual monocultures—corn, wheat, rice—abuse the soil. What if we mimicked nature and grew perennial grains in mixtures instead?

Via CIMMYT, Int.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

The Plan to Rescue Hawaii’s Birds with Genetic Engineering

The Plan to Rescue Hawaii’s Birds with Genetic Engineering | my universe | Scoop.it
There’s a chance to use cutting-edge technology to save native Hawaiian birds from the mosquitoes that are driving them to extinction.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

Parent, carer… #AndAScientist : Naturejobs Blog

Parent, carer… #AndAScientist : Naturejobs Blog | my universe | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

Siemens and Airbus to push electric aviation engines

Siemens and Airbus to push electric aviation engines | my universe | Scoop.it
Siemens and Airbus teamed up today to develop electric and hybrid electric/combustion engines for commercial and private aircraft.
The companies said they would amass a joint development team of about 200 employees that would jointly develop prototypes for various propulsion systems with power classes ranging from a few 100 kilowatts up to 10 and more megawatts, for short, local trips with aircraft below 100 seats, helicopters or unmanned aircraft up to classic short and medium-range flights.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

The ‘Human Computer’ Behind the Moon Landing Was a Black Woman

The ‘Human Computer’ Behind the Moon Landing Was a Black Woman | my universe | Scoop.it
In an age of racism and sexism, Katherine Johnson broke both barriers at NASA.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

Thirsty Land - Will there be enough water to survive?

Thirsty Land is a documentary film Will there be enough water to survive?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

Slaughter at the bridge: uncovering a colossal Bronze Age battle

Slaughter at the bridge: uncovering a colossal Bronze Age battle | my universe | Scoop.it
Grisly find suggests Bronze Age northern Europe was more organized—and violent—than thought
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Norman Warthmann from Rice Blast
Scoop.it!

PLOS Pathogens: Cooperation and Conflict in the Plant Immune System

PLOS Pathogens: Cooperation and Conflict in the Plant Immune System | my universe | Scoop.it
Plants have a sophisticated innate immune system with which they defend themselves against a myriad of pathogens. During the past two decades, work in a range of species has advanced our knowledge of the molecular and biochemical details of plant immunity. Many of these studies have focused on the action of nucleotide-binding domain/leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR or NLR) immune receptors. NLR genes constitute the most diverse gene family in plants, reflecting their role in perceiving a very diverse set of molecules that are released by pathogens. There has also been progress in unraveling the forces that drive diversification of NLR and non-NLR immune receptors in wild species. A major recent insight from mechanistic and evolutionary studies is that there is both cooperation and conflict in the plant immune system. Here, we propose that these two antagonistic forces are inherently entangled, and that they are potentially fundamental to our understanding of growth-defense trade-offs.

Via Elsa Ballini
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

23andMe to Share DNA Data with Researchers Using Apple iPhone

Consumers with iPhones can click to contribute their genetic information to medical studies.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

Rates and mechanisms of bacterial mutagenesis from maximum-depth sequencing : Nature : Nature Publishing Group

Rates and mechanisms of bacterial mutagenesis from maximum-depth sequencing : Nature : Nature Publishing Group | my universe | Scoop.it
In 1943, Luria and Delbrück used a phage-resistance assay to establish spontaneous mutation as a driving force of microbial diversity. Mutation rates are still studied using such assays, but these can only be used to examine the small minority of mutations conferring survival in a particular condition. Newer approaches, such as long-term evolution followed by whole-genome sequencing, may be skewed by mutational ‘hot’ or ‘cold’ spots. Both approaches are affected by numerous caveats. Here we devise a method, maximum-depth sequencing (MDS), to detect extremely rare variants in a population of cells through error-corrected, high-throughput sequencing. We directly measure locus-specific mutation rates in Escherichia coli and show that they vary across the genome by at least an order of magnitude. Our data suggest that certain types of nucleotide misincorporation occur 104-fold more frequently than the basal rate of mutations, but are repaired in vivo. Our data also suggest specific mechanisms of antibiotic-induced mutagenesis, including downregulation of mismatch repair via oxidative stress, transcription–replication conflicts, and, in the case of fluoroquinolones, direct damage to DNA.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Norman Warthmann from Ag Biotech News
Scoop.it!

New plant engineering method could help fill demand for crucial malaria drug - Max Planck (2016) 

New plant engineering method could help fill demand for crucial malaria drug - Max Planck (2016)  | my universe | Scoop.it

A new and inexpensive technique for mass-producing the main ingredient in the most effective treatment for malaria, artemisinin, could help meet global demands for the drug... Artemisinin is produced in low yields by a herb called Artemisia annua (A. annua)... Researchers... discovered a new way to produce artemisinic acid, the molecule from which artemisinin is derived, in high yields. Their method involves transferring its metabolic pathway... into tobacco, a high-biomass crop.

“Malaria is a devastating tropical disease that kills almost half a million people every year... For the foreseeable future, artemisinin will be the most powerful weapon in the battle against malaria but, due to its extraction from low-yielding plants, it is currently too expensive to be widely accessible to patients in poorer countries. Producing artemisinic acid in a crop such as tobacco, which yields large amounts of leafy biomass, could provide a sustainable and inexpensive source of the drug, making it more readily available for those who need it most”...  

Although further increases in these production levels will be needed if global demand for artemisinin is to be met, the study lays the foundation for much cheaper production of this life-saving therapy in a high-biomass crop, in contrast to a single medicinal plant. It also provides a new tool for engineering many other complex pathways, with the potential to increase production of other essential therapeutic ingredients.


http://www.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/2069723/rbock-malaria-drug-in-tobacco


Underlying article: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13664



Via Alexander J. Stein
more...
Alexander J. Stein's curator insight, June 15, 5:32 PM
Tobacco is a good target plant: Not a food crop, high yielding, and offering tobacco farmers an alternative source of income than supplying the tobacco industry... 
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

The pressure to publish pushes down quality

The pressure to publish pushes down quality | my universe | Scoop.it
Scientists must publish less, says Daniel Sarewitz, or good research will be swamped by the ever-increasing volume of poor work.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

‘Do Not Privatize the Giant's Shoulders’: Rethinking Patents in Plant Breeding: Trends in Biotechnology

‘Do Not Privatize the Giant's Shoulders’: Rethinking Patents in Plant Breeding: Trends in Biotechnology | my universe | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

Comparative metagenomics reveals a diverse range of antimicrobial resistance genes in effluents entering a river catchment

Comparative metagenomics reveals a diverse range of antimicrobial resistance genes in effluents entering a river catchment | my universe | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

A Proposal Regarding Best Practices for Validating the Identity of Genetic Stocks and the Effects of Genetic Variants

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

NASA: Global Warming Is Now Changing How Earth Wobbles

NASA: Global Warming Is Now Changing How Earth Wobbles | my universe | Scoop.it
NASA: Global Warming Is Now Changing How Earth Wobbles
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Norman Warthmann from Plants and Microbes
Scoop.it!

Nature Biotechnology: Plant immunity switched from bacteria to virus (2016)

Nature Biotechnology: Plant immunity switched from bacteria to virus (2016) | my universe | Scoop.it

Each year, staple crops around the world suffer massive losses in yield owing to the destruc- tive effects of pathogens. Improving the disease resistance of crops by boosting their immunity has been a key objective of agricultural bio- tech ever since the discovery of plant immune receptors in the 1990s. Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins, a family of intracellular immune receptors that recog- nize pathogen molecules, are promising targets for enhancing pathogen resistance. In a recent paper in Science, Kim et al.1 describe a clever twist on this approach in which the host target protein for the pathogen effector is engineered rather than the NLR protein itself (Fig. 1).


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

A safe operating space for humanity : Article : Nature

A safe operating space for humanity : Article : Nature | my universe | Scoop.it

"Identifying and quantifying planetary boundaries that must not be transgressed could help prevent human activities from causing unacceptable environmental change, argue Johan Rockström and colleagues."

Norman Warthmann's insight:
a good read, every time.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

Farming in 2050: storing carbon could help meet Australia's climate goals

Farming in 2050: storing carbon could help meet Australia's climate goals | my universe | Scoop.it
Growing population, growing demand for food, climate change: Australia's rural lands are facing a number of pressures. So how can we sustainably use them in the future?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Norman Warthmann
Scoop.it!

Scientists Warn of Perilous Climate Shift Within Decades, Not Centuries

Scientists Warn of Perilous Climate Shift Within Decades, Not Centuries | my universe | Scoop.it
Findings published on Tuesday are likely to replay a debate among climate scientists that started when a draft version of the paper came out last year.
more...
No comment yet.