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Farmer’s use of genetically modified soybeans grows into Supreme Court case - Washington Post (2013)

Farmer’s use of genetically modified soybeans grows into Supreme Court case - Washington Post (2013) | my universe | Scoop.it

Bowman’s unorthodox soybean farming techniques have landed him at the center of a national battle over genetically modified crops. His legal battle, now at the Supreme Court, raises questions about whether the right to patent living things extends to their progeny, and how companies that engage in cutting-edge research can recoup their investments.

 

What Bowman did was to take commodity grain from the local elevator, which is usually used for feed, and plant it. But that grain was mostly progeny of Monsanto’s Roundup Ready beans because that’s what most Indiana soybean farmers grow. Those soybeans are genetically modified to survive the weedkiller Roundup, and Monsanto claims that Bowman’s planting violated the company’s restrictions.

 

Those supporting Bowman hope the court uses the case, which is scheduled for oral arguments later this month, to hit the reset button on corporate domination of agribusiness and what they call Monsanto’s “legal assault” on farmers who don’t toe the line. Monsanto’s supporters say advances in health and environmental research are endangered.

 

And the case raises questions about the traditional role of farmers. For instance: When a farmer grows Monsanto’s genetically modified soybean seeds, has he simply “used” the seed to create a crop to sell, or has he “made” untold replicas of Monsanto’s invention that remain subject to the company’s restrictions? ...

 

Farmers who buy seeds with the Roundup Ready trait sign an agreement that says they may be used for one planting only. Even though the gene exists in the new beans they grow, farmers cannot save them for a second planting, nor sell them to others for that purpose. But they are allowed to sell the beans to giant grain elevators, like those that are the most prominent feature on the flat landscape in Bowman’s corner of southern Indiana. 

 

From 1999 to 2007, Bowman purchased Roundup Ready seeds for his first planting of soybeans and abided by Monsanto’s restrictions. But like some farmers, he also plants a second crop later in the growing season; such crops are highly dependent on the weather, which makes them more hit-or-miss.

It is too risky to pay the high price of Monsanto’s Roundup-resistant seeds for the second crop of the season, Bowman said, so instead he purchased cheaper commodity grain from the local elevator, which is usually used for feed. He planted it, and when he sprayed the crop with the herbicide, almost all survived. That wasn’t surprising, because 94 percent of Indiana soybean farmers grow Roundup Ready beans. 

 

Bowman told Monsanto exactly what he was doing, and Monsanto told him to stop. The farmer was in effect “soybean laundering,” according to some of the companies supporting Monsanto at the Supreme Court — selling Roundup Ready progeny beans to the grain elevator and hoping other farmers were too, then buying them back and planting them...


Via Alexander J. Stein
Norman Warthmann's insight:

this will be an interesting lawsuit to follow :)

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Why Today’s Automobile Industry Looks A Lot Like IBM in 1985

Why Today’s Automobile Industry Looks A Lot Like IBM in 1985 | my universe | Scoop.it
With the number of mobile phone subscriptions shortly expected to exceed the total global population, what is the next great connected device going to look..
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Resistance to antibiotics found in isolated Amazonian tribe

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Villagers evolved antibiotic resistance without being exposed to Western medicine
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Study suggests STEM faculty hiring favors women over men | InsideHigherEd

Study suggests STEM faculty hiring favors women over men | InsideHigherEd | my universe | Scoop.it

Many studies suggest that women scientists aspiring to careers in academe face roadblocks, including bias -- implicit or overt -- in hiring. But a new study is throwing a curveball into the literature, suggesting that women candidates are favored 2 to 1 over men for tenure-track positions in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. Could it be that STEM gender diversity and bias awareness efforts are working, or even creating a preference for female candidates -- or is something more nuanced going on? Experts say it’s probably both....

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Cannabis smokers warned they risk poorer exam grades

Cannabis smokers warned they risk poorer exam grades | my universe | Scoop.it
Dutch study finds mathematics results suffer most from dope consumption – findings sure to fuel debate over steps towards legalisation
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A new website shows how global warming could change your town

A new website shows how global warming could change your town | my universe | Scoop.it
Melbourne to Adelaide, Sydney to Brisbane: climate change could move the climate of Australia's towns and cities, as revealed by a new website.
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Is Climate Change Causing the Seasons to Change? Citizen Science Helps Find Out

Is Climate Change Causing the Seasons to Change? Citizen Science Helps Find Out | my universe | Scoop.it
In 1998 Tim Sparks, a research biologist at Britain’s Centre for Ecology and Hydrology in Cambridge started a pilot project designed to record the first blush of spring.
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Learning to See Data - NYTimes.com

FOR the past year or so genetic scientists at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York have been collaborating with a specialist from another universe: Daniel Kohn, a Brooklyn-based painter and conceptual artist. 
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Rescooped by Norman Warthmann from applied genomics
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One thousand genes you could live without

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First study of a nation’s genomes reveals intriguing insights into Icelandic people
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United Nations urged to ensure open plant genomes

United Nations urged to ensure open plant genomes | my universe | Scoop.it
A plant scientist from The Australian National University (ANU) has called for the United Nations to guarantee free and open access to plant DNA sequences to enable scientists to continue work to sustainably intensify world food production. Dr Norman Warthmann, a plant geneticist at the ANU Research School of Biology, has lodged a submission with the UN, which is currently considering issues to include in its 2015 Global Sustainable Development Report.
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Aspiring to something magnificent with science in Australia

Aspiring to something magnificent with science in Australia | my universe | Scoop.it
Science matters and is important for Australia's future but there is evidence mounting that we are falling behind the rest of the world.
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Scientists Seek Ban on Method of Editing the Human Genome

Scientists Seek Ban on Method of Editing the Human Genome | my universe | Scoop.it
A group of biologists, including the scientist who developed the technique, has called for a worldwide moratorium on using the method to change human DNA.
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Do We Stop Caring About Popular Music in Our 30s? — Cuepoint — Medium

Do We Stop Caring About Popular Music in Our 30s? - Cuepoint - Medium
A new study shows our taste in chart-toppers thrives until age 25, then quickly gets unhip
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Improved genome inference in the MHC using a population reference graph : Nature Genetics : Nature Publishing Group

Improved genome inference in the MHC using a population reference graph : Nature Genetics : Nature Publishing Group | my universe | Scoop.it
Gil McVean, Alexander Dilthey and colleagues present a graphical model-based method for accurate genomic assembly that uses the diversity present in multiple reference sequences, as represented by a population reference graph. The method is applied to simulated and empirical data from the human MHC region to demonstrate the improved accuracy of genomic inference.
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Genomic breeding for food, environment and livelihoods - Rivers &al (2015) - Food Sec

Genomic breeding for food, environment and livelihoods - Rivers &al (2015) - Food Sec | my universe | Scoop.it

Land use management is a central challenge for the 21st century with unprecedented and competing demands to produce food, feed/fodder, fibre, fuel, and essential ecosystem services which sustain life. Global change requires rapid adaptation in current and emerging crops as well as in the foundation species of natural ecosystems.

 

Revolutions in genomics and high throughput experimentation are transforming breeding so that adaptive traits in new environments can be predicted and selected more directly from germplasm collections of crops and wild species. This genomic breeding is now feasible in almost any species and has promise to help meet the need to feed and nourish over 9 billion people by 2050.

 

Genomic techniques can accelerate our response to food security challenges of yield, quality and resilience and also address environmental security challenges. To achieve its potential there will need to be widespread and ongoing investments in the human capital to promote genomic breeding... 

 

Advanced plant science and genomics have revolutionised breeding and crop improvement, and will continue to do so. Innovation in collecting genotypes, phenotypes, and intermediate characteristics, is allowing new crop varieties to be selected faster and more accurately than ever before.

 

With genomic techniques researchers can help address food security challenges of yield, quality, resilience, and other environmental and social needs. Investing in the human capital to perform genomic breeding is needed to improve food security, environments and livelihoods.

 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12571-015-0431-3

 


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It Takes a Party

It Takes a Party | my universe | Scoop.it

How did the parties get this far apart? Political scientists suggest that it has a lot to do with income inequality.....

Norman Warthmann's insight:

Krugman on why, for the upcoming US elections, the candidate does not matter

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The World’s Most Lucrative Crops | Big Picture Agriculture

The World’s Most Lucrative Crops | Big Picture Agriculture | my universe | Scoop.it
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No turnover in lens lipids for the entire human lifespan

No turnover in lens lipids for the entire human lifespan | my universe | Scoop.it
The carbon in lens membrane lipids correlates to the year of birth of an individual, a phenomenon that is unprecedented in the current body of literature.
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Australia is in one of the worst housing bubbles we have ever seen

Australia is in one of the worst housing bubbles we have ever seen | my universe | Scoop.it
COMMENT: Housing prices and mortgage debt have significantly outpaced economic fundamentals for almost two decades.
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Heinz And Kraft: Before They Were Food Giants, They Were Men

Heinz And Kraft: Before They Were Food Giants, They Were Men | my universe | Scoop.it
Henry Heinz was big into pickles before ketchup came along. James Kraft gave the world American cheese. (Ironically, he was Canadian.) Now, two companies that revamped how we eat will become one.
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Paris 2015 climate summit: countries' targets beyond 2020

Paris 2015 climate summit: countries' targets beyond 2020 | my universe | Scoop.it
In the lead up to climate meetings in Paris at the end of the year, countries will release draft targets - the framework of a possible global climate deal. Follow our interactive map as we track these targets.
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BioTechniques - The Epigenetics of Exercise

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Exercise is good for our health, improving everything from metabolism to lung capacity. But what brings about these changes on a molecular level? Find out...
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Rescooped by Norman Warthmann from Food Security
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Peak food? Can food tech supercharge crop yields and address global food security?

Peak food? Can food tech supercharge crop yields and address global food security? | my universe | Scoop.it
Globally, humanity has reached “peak food,” according to a recent study by Ecology and Society. Peak rice was back in 1988, causing some worry about the long-term food security of this global staple crop. Peak chicken was in 2006. Peak milk and wheat were in 2004.

Via CIMMYT, Int.
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Do TV Cooking Shows Make Us Fat?

Do TV Cooking Shows Make Us Fat? | my universe | Scoop.it
Women who cooked the meals they saw prepared on television weighed more, on average, than those who simply watched, a study shows. The findings challenge the notion that home cooking is always best.

Via Cathryn Wellner
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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, March 19, 2:06 PM

Interesting proposition, but the link is pretty tenuous.