A Random Collection of sites
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A Random Collection of sites
Places I like to shop, search for ideas, recipes and designs
Curated by Kim Flintoff
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Are ATARs useless?

Are ATARs useless? | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
What timing! Yesterday HW reminded readers about some of the commentary around ATARs, including Swinburne vice-chancellor Linda Kristjanson and La Trobe vice-chancellor John Dewar, who both — in various ways — called the entry scheme pointless.

But look what’s turned up today. A submission to the Productivity Commission from the esteemed National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education, which says: “That research also confirmed that the ATAR is a very robust statistical predictor of later academic success, something that is commonly challenged.”

Not so, according to Deakin’s Jane den Hollander, who wrote in the Geelong Advertiser that “focusing on such an artificial indicator of a person’s ability to teach well, such as an ATAR result, assumes universities cannot harness potential. There is no evidence this is the case.”
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Teachers Like Technology in the Classroom, But Few Think It's Well Integrated

Teachers Like Technology in the Classroom, But Few Think It's Well Integrated | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
Ninety-one percent of teachers agree that technology gives them more ability to tailor lessons and homework assignments to the individual needs of each student, but only 16 percent of teachers give their schools an 'A' grade for incorporating it into their classrooms, according to a new national survey.

The 'Teachers' Dream Classroom Survey,' sponsored by online education resources provider Edgenuity, was conducted to better understand technology use in the classroom and how it impacts the educational experience. The findings are based on responses to an online survey given in March to a random sample of 400 middle and high school teachers in grades 6 through 12.

"Technology can be an incredible force multiplier for teachers," said Sari Factor, CEO of Edgenuity, in a statement. "Good teachers are already doing so much to personalize learning for their students. Educators are now beginning to focus on how to integrate technology to improve student outcomes."
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This non-speaking teen wrote an incredibly profound letter explaining autism - Lifestyle - NZ Herald News

This non-speaking teen wrote an incredibly profound letter explaining autism - Lifestyle - NZ Herald News | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
For the first 14 and a half years of Gordy's life, Evan and Dara Baylinson had no reason to believe their son could comprehend anything they said: He had never spoken, and he couldn't - New Zealand Herald
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Elsevier Stirs Up Controversy with SSRN Acquisition -- Campus Technology

Elsevier Stirs Up Controversy with SSRN Acquisition -- Campus Technology | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
Response to the purchase was immediate and fierce, but Elsevier maintains it will keep SSRN's "freemium" model.

Elsevier revealed yesterday it has purchased the open access Social Science Research Network (SSRN) for an undisclosed amount. Reactions to the deal have been less than positive, to say the least.

 

Elsevier, the largest publisher of academic journals in the world, with more than 2,000 titles and more than $3 billion in revenue in 2015, has been widely criticized for what some characterize as exorbitant subscription rates for many of its academic journals. Annual subscriptions for libraries can cost thousands of dollars for a single journal, with several surpassing the $10,000 mark for combined or multi-volume licenses. (Many annual subscriptions, though, are less than $1,000.)

 

Critics argue that these rates would be justified if the costs to produce the journals were high for Elsevier. However, as several pointed out yesterday, Elsevier (and other scholarly publishers) don’t pay for the research, don’t compensate researchers and are under no obligation to pay reviewers. And in the case of digital subscriptions, they don’t even have to pay mechanical costs for printing.

 

Elsevier has also been criticized for being a “copyright maximalist,” targeting academic institutions and researchers alike for copyright infringement (as when the company demanded researchers at the University of Calgary remove papers they’d authored from their site) and lobbying for greater takedown powers. And just this month, Elsevier’s actions cost Sci-Hub its domain name, though the service continues to be available through Telegram.

 

All that in the overarching context that much of what Elsevier publishes is publicly funded research ... to which the public has no free access once Elsevier gets its hands on it.

These perceptions prompted several choice headlines among academic and technology writers, including:

Kim Flintoff's insight:

It seems that academic publishing is simply paywalling everything available... stymies research efforts, withholds pubic access, and serves no greater good.

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Personalize Learning: Personalized Learning Through the Eyes of a Child

Personalize Learning: Personalized Learning Through the Eyes of a Child | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
We’re learners even before the moment we are born. Nearly every observation made as babies is tucked away as a memory of a lesson learned. We all begin as learners naturally making our own discoveries. We are curious about how things work, and experiment with our own ideas. Our inner spirited learner says, “Get out of my way!” as we yearn to take command of our learning.
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5 tips to engage parents using technology they already use

5 tips to engage parents using technology they already use | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
The trick to getting more parents involved in what’s going on in the classroom: stick to video, social media, and other familiar tech
Teachers have become pretty adept at doing more with less, but in our efforts to offset funding cuts, we often overlook a very important, and inexpensive, resource: parents. In fact, parents can make such a big impact that researchers have found that schools would need to increase per-pupil spending by more than $1,000 in order to achieve the same results gained by parental involvement.
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Study in prison reduces recidivism and welfare dependence: A case study from Western Australia 2005–2010

Study in prison reduces recidivism and welfare dependence: A case study from Western Australia 2005–2010 | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
Abstract | Using a longitudinal dataset of prisoners in Western Australia, this paper describes the effectiveness of correctional education in improving post-release outcomes. The report shows that the more classes completed by prisoners the lower the rate of re-incarceration and the less likely they are to increase the seriousness of their offending. These, and other personal and societal benefits such as a reduction in welfare dependence, were positively associated with the number of classes prisoners successfully completed—that is, the more classes the inmate successfully completes, the less likely they are to reoffend and to access unemployment benefits.

Much has been written about how correctional education contributes to post-release outcomes for ex-prisoners. In their systematic review of 50 studies of the effectiveness of correctional education, Davis et al. (2013) found that study in prison unequivocally reduces post-release recidivism and, on average, increases post-release employment. Unlike most earlier studies of the impact of correctional education on recidivism and employment, including the primary studies included in the Davis et al. (2013) meta-analysis, this study uses five years of linked prison history, correctional education and income support payments data.

Improved employment and offending outcomes may better enable offenders to successfully reintegrate into their communities, and could produce cost savings into the future for justice authorities and social welfare services. This paper reports on the contribution of correctional education to reducing recidivism and welfare dependence (as a proxy for unemployment) for ex-prisoners in Western Australia.
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globalmakerspaces #globalmakerday

globalmakerspaces #globalmakerday | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it

#GLOBALMAKERDAY

LEARN
Connect virtually and watch makers discuss on a live Google Hangout about different projects, learning spaces, creations, coding, 3D designs, art lessons, etc. There will be a session each hour within the four categories: Designer, Entrepreneur, Re-Creator and Global Problem Solver. When you arrive to the landing page, you will select a category and watch the live presentation.  
SHARE
We will spotlight those that have amazing things to share.
PLAY
One part of the event is participating in challenges with opportunity for your class to solve problems, be creative and PLAY. Some activities will be posted on the website in early March for long-term projects, but challenges will be given in the sessions and during the day of the event to play during #GlobalMakerDay!

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JCU researcher deems ADHD a real medical condition

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a real medical condition, not merely poor behaviour. That’s the message from Dr Helen Boon, a researcher at James Cook University. Whether ADHD is caused by nature or nurture, or a bit of both, is still to be determined, but having this neurological starting point drains the issue of dogmatic speculation and gives it a scientific framework.

ADHD manifests in children aged 6 to 12. Symptoms include problems paying attention, excessive activity and impulsivity. It is diagnosed three times more frequently in boys than girls, and affects between 5 and 7 per cent of children. Management includes behavioural therapies, changes to diet and medication.

“International surveys indicate that many teachers are ambivalent about recognising ADHD as a real disease,” Boon said. “They don’t know how to approach it and they get frustrated. In addition, school resources and support staff such as teacher aides are not automatically provided to children with ADHD unless they have major cognitive impairments or additional disabilities, like autism.”

Boon said she perused 174 neuroimaging studies involving MRI scans, comparing them against a control group, and found differences.

“The brain circuitry in someone with ADHD is different from someone without – no question,” she surmised.

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Curtin Arcade - Staff News | Curtin University, Perth, Australia

Curtin Arcade - Staff News | Curtin University, Perth, Australia | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it

Do you consider yourself a gamer? Staff can come and play some local arcade games for free at Curtin Arcade.

Curtin Arcade will run on Wednesday 4 and 11 of May from 12.00pm to 2.00pm.

The games will be set-up on the grassed area outside the Vege Patch Café so take a break from work and come and have a play.

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Forward Government Learning 2016 - ARK GROUP AUSTRALIA

Forward Government Learning 2016 - ARK GROUP AUSTRALIA | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it

This forum is designed to deliver outstanding content, strategies, best practice and valuable tools to bring the most powerful forms of professional learning back to their organisations.

There are no sales presentations, but this forum specifically designed so that delegates learn through every presentation. New ways of learning have been tested and implemented across the Australian public sector, some successfully, some not. Done
effectively the benefits become apparent due to its time and cost efficiency and flexible way of getting knowledge across to the targeted people.

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Nature Index determines Curtin’s research is most collaborative

Nature Index determines Curtin’s research is most collaborative | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
Curtin University has been announced as the most collaborative of the Australian universities and the biggest Australian mover in the Nature Index results for 2016.
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Online tool to combat schoolyard bullying

Online tool to combat schoolyard bullying | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
  • Online tool to help teachers stamp out bullying in primary school-aged kids
  • Curtin research is focusing on bullying peaks from ages 8-12
  • Listening and talking to kids and using online resources can already address bullying

 

TEACHERS may soon have a way to pinpoint and measure the seriousness of covert bullying incidents at school and how it affects primary school-aged kids.

Curtin University researchers are developing the online tool which they hope will one day improve bullying intervention and prevention strategies in WA schools.

Covert bullying happens when children purposely hide their bullying from adults, Curtin School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine PhD student Helen Nelson says.

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Everyone Loves Tynker!

Kids, parents, and teachers love Tynker. "I thought a game would be extremely hard to make but Tynker made it easy."
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Grayson Perry creates huge phallus to represent bankers' worldview

Grayson Perry creates huge phallus to represent bankers' worldview | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
Artist says latest work, which is covered in banknotes and George Osborne’s image, was inspired by industry’s self-denial about gender bias
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Education focus necessary beyond elections: McGraw-Hill boss

Education focus necessary beyond elections: McGraw-Hill boss | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it

Focus on education must last beyond federal elections, the chief executive of a multinational educational publisher has argued.

David Levin, from McGraw-Hill Education – one of the ‘big three’ educational publishers – said education, unlike elections, is always around. It shouldn’t be pandered about as a cheap way of getting more votes, but examined through a long-term lens, Levin said.

Reform should be considered similarly, he argued.

Always a little cautious of edcuation“Education is going to be with us forever, so you’ve got to have a perspective that says, ‘I’ve got to make the right long-term decisions, which are about bedding in systems and processes and all of those things,’ because one product will come and go, but you invest in teachers over a long period of time,” Levin told Campus Review.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
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How To Teach Children That Failure Is The Secret To Success

How To Teach Children That Failure Is The Secret To Success | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
Is failure a positive opportunity to learn and grow, or is it a negative experience that hinders success? How parents answer that question has a big influence on how much children think they can improve their intelligence through hard work, a study says.

"Parents are a really critical force in child development when you think about how motivation and mindsets develop," says Kyla Haimovitz, a professor of psychology at Stanford University. She coauthored the study, published in Psychological Science with colleague Carol Dweck, who pioneered research on mindsets. "Parents have this powerful effect really early on and throughout childhood to send messages about what is failure, how to respond to it."
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Prison Program Turns Inmates Into Intellectuals

In nearly every instance, when the men read from their own compositions, the writing was absorbing, learned and impeccable. All of the men had gained admission, through a competitive application process, to a program initiated by John Jay three years ago that allows prisoners who have high school diplomas or G.E.D.s, and who are eligible for release within five years, to amass college credits, and then when they leave, to complete degrees in the City University system. Ms. Dreisinger is the program’s academic director and founder, overseeing the teaching of art history, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Toni Morrison and so on. She is adamant about the instruction of grammar, which is why the men’s writing stands out even beside what you might find among students at elite high schools where a warning about dangling modifiers is often considered a benighted waste of time.
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We Have Personalization Backwards -

We Have Personalization Backwards - | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it

With the right system of connected explanations and examples we could serve students the individual content they need on numerous dimensions:

  • The”traditional” student could get the explanation that taps into dorm life and high school drama, while the older student could get an example that resonates more with their life and doesn’t make them feel unwelcome every time they read the textbook.
  • Students who find one example too difficult could “dial-down” to something more introductory.
  • Students with a special area of expertise would have opportunities to leverage that expertise to understand new things.
  • Students with accessibility issues could get accessible content, and rather than universal design meaning the best possible path for everybody it could mean the material and platform out of which anyone could construct a viable and unique path, regardless of strengths and challenges.
  • As students came to understand things, they would write their own explanations and examples which could be fed back into the system to be used by others.

 

If we in the OER community were pursuing this dream, here’s some things we’d be working on:

  • Modular content instead of textbooks. Tons of the stuff.
  • Massively varied content instead massively generic content.
  • Recommendation engines that track what sort of content works for individual people.
  • Technology that allows individual students to share and curate the material that works for them.
  • Systems for students and faculty to create, fork, and improve content they use.
  • Pedagogy that allows multiple approaches to (and ultimately multiple interpretations of) course goals.

 

Now, here’s what we seem to be working on instead:

  • Textbooks (but open).
  • End-to-end courseware (but free).
  • Personalization technologies that map the thin content of textbooks and courseware to testable student needs.
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Autism

Autism | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it

Introduction


Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder whose symptoms include a lack of social skills, difficulties with language and communication, and repetitive behavioral patterns.[i] ASD diagnoses have increased significantly over the past several decades and currently affect 1 in 68 children.[ii] The condition is about 4.5 times more common in boys, and can affect boys and girls differently.[iii]

ASD starts in early childhood (ages two to four) and lasts throughout life.[iv] While there is no known cure, there are therapies and strategies that can build skills and increase functioning. Because people with ASD behave, interact, and perceive the world in unique ways, they often learn differently than other children. They also need special support aimed at addressing the deficits caused by their ASD.


The section below highlights key findings from the research on Autism Spectrum Disorder.

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Few teachers give schools an ‘A’ for classroom technology

Few teachers give schools an ‘A’ for classroom technology | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
New survey reveals less than one-fifth of teachers give their school top marks for incorporating technology into the classroom
Only 16 percent of teachers in a recent survey give their schools an ‘A’ for incorporating technology into their classroom, and 48 percent of all surveyed teachers consider the technology they do have to be outdated.

Teachers’ Dream Classroom Survey, sponsored by Edgenuity, reveals that of teachers who did give their schools an ‘A’ for classroom technology integration, 80 percent said they feel technology helps them achieve learning objectives.

Eighty-six percent of teachers said they are either somewhat satisfied (64 percent) or very satisfied (22 percent) with how well the tools and technology in their classrooms facilitate learning.
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Sugar Tax: a health sweetener, or just a bitter pill?

“We can start with a tax on sugary drinks,” says Curtin research fellow Martin Caraher.
But what do YOU think?
It’s been done in Mexico, parts of the US and elsewhere around the world, and experts like Professor Caraher say the health damage sugar causes leave no doubt.
More about studying Public Health at Curtin:
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Pop-up Skate Park - Staff News | Curtin University, Perth, Australia

Pop-up Skate Park - Staff News | Curtin University, Perth, Australia | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it

A skate park is popping up at Lower Henderson on Friday 6 May from 11.00am to 6.00pm. Staff who are keen skateboarders, scooter and BMX riders bring your equipment and go for it. All staff are welcome so even if you don’t have any experience just bring yourself, borrow a skateboard and a helmet and give it a go. 

 

 A DJ will be providing the tunes and there will be skills clinics for the more beginner users.


Staff who are keen skateboarders, scooter and BMX riders bring your equipment and go for it.

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Excessive copyright costs Australia billions, says Productivity Commission

Excessive copyright costs Australia billions, says Productivity Commission | A Random Collection of sites | Scoop.it
The Productivity Commission has recommended the free import of books, the free use of copyrighted material under new so-called "fair use" rules, a leglislated guarantee that consumers have the right to defeat internet geoblockers and much tighter restrictions on the granting and use of patents, under reforms it says could save consumers up to $1 billion a year.

Consumers should also have a legislated right to defeat internet geoblocks set by such companies as Amazon, it says.

Subtitled Copy(not)right, the draft report of the commission's nine-month inquiry into intellectual property finds copyright terms are way in excess of what is needed, offering more than 100 years of protection for works that ought to be protected for 15 to 20 years.
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