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Xtranormal: The Person You Admire!

It is a conversation between two girls talking about the persons who admire.

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Amabile Pacios's curator insight, May 10, 2013 8:11 AM

The amounts recognized by the people, as respect, love and seriousness are the people we admire.

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MOOCs and Open Courses – what’s the difference? : JISC

MOOCs and Open Courses – what’s the difference? : JISC | my digital literacy | Scoop.it

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Karen Young's curator insight, March 13, 2013 3:10 PM

Nice breakdown of what the various terms mean

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Plagiarism and the link: How the web makes attribution easier -- and more complicated | paidContent

Plagiarism and the link: How the web makes attribution easier -- and more complicated | paidContent | my digital literacy | Scoop.it

Nate Thayer, the writer who touched off a debate this week about how freelancers are compensated, found himself embroiled in another controversy on Friday when he was accused of plagiarizing large parts of the piece that The Atlantic wanted him to re-work for free. In his defence, Thayer and his editor said links weren’t included in the original version due to an editing error, a mistake they later corrected. This failed to satisfy some of the writer’s critics, however, including the author of the piece that Thayer based some of his reporting on.

 

If nothing else, the incident helps reinforce just how blurry the line is between plagiarism and sloppy attribution — and also how the the web makes it easier to provide attribution via hyperlinks, but at the same time makes it harder to define what is plagiarism or content theft and what isn’t.

 

To Jeremy Duns, who first blew the whistle on what he said was Thayer’s plagiarism, the case seemed open and shut: chunks of the article about North Korea and basketball, including a number of quotes, appeared to have been lifted straight from a piece by San Diego Union-Tribune writer Mark Zeigler on the same topic in 2006. And there was virtually no attribution of any kind in the original version of Thayer’s story, which appeared at the NKNews.com site, apart from one oblique reference to the Union-Tribune — and no links.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Mary Clark's curator insight, March 16, 2013 6:00 PM

Great example for students, inclluding the comments in which mention is made of one commentor changing another's Wikipedia entry! 

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More Hack, Less Yack?: Modularity, Theory and Habitus in the Digital Humanities | Adeline Koh

More Hack, Less Yack?: Modularity, Theory and Habitus in the Digital Humanities | Adeline Koh | my digital literacy | Scoop.it
RT @adelinekoh: @patrick_mj @roopikarisam @eetempleton @tjowens @whkchun right, @tmcphers calls this 'lenticular logic' http://t.co/ei3lto5pXp

Via Andrea Naranjo
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Rescooped by Erin Luong from techined
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The Padagogy Wheel

The Padagogy Wheel | my digital literacy | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Shirley Moody, Gust MEES, GSeremetakis, Katharina Kulle, John Evans, Susan van Gelder
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Simon Vuillaume's curator insight, April 29, 2013 5:58 PM

Ipadagogy... 

Deborah Banker's curator insight, May 12, 2013 2:03 PM

WOW!!  How cool is this?!

Louise Lewis's curator insight, September 20, 2013 8:34 PM

Perfect for our research into Web 2.0 tools that we may include in our webmixes

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How Technologies Have Shaped Society and Vice Versa

How Technologies Have Shaped Society and Vice Versa | my digital literacy | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Erin Luong from Digital citizens in school
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A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: Let's Teach Our Students About Copyright: 15 Sites Which Can Assist You

A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: Let's Teach Our Students About Copyright: 15 Sites Which Can Assist You | my digital literacy | Scoop.it

Via Sam Boswell
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15 Digital Tools that Support Project-Based Learning | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies

15 Digital Tools that Support Project-Based Learning | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies | my digital literacy | Scoop.it
15 Digital Tools that Support Project-Based Learning | Check them out at Dr. Kimberly's Literacy Blog http://t.co/Z9Zq6Xidth #pblchat
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21 Literacy Resources For The Digital Teacher | Teaching Tools Today

21 Literacy Resources For The Digital Teacher | Teaching Tools Today | my digital literacy | Scoop.it
Ness Crouch's insight: Literacy is a keystone of education. Teachers must constantly stay ahead of digital tools to all them to teach students. This list of resources is an excellent way to help stay in front!
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On Legitimacy, Place and the Anthropology of the Internet

On Legitimacy, Place and the Anthropology of the Internet | my digital literacy | Scoop.it
Editor's note: In this thoughtful piece for February's Openness Edition, Sarah Kendzior (@sarahkendzior) discusses the ways in which the internet has transformed the relationship between the writer...

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Cyborg: From Science Fiction to Social Reality

Cyborg: From Science Fiction to Social Reality | my digital literacy | Scoop.it

The emerging technological developments across various scientificfields have brought about radical changes in the ways we perceive and define

what it means to be human in today‟s highlytechnologically oriented society.Advancements in robotics, AI research, molecular biology, genetic engineering,nanotechnology, medicine, etc., are mostly still in an experimental phase but itis likely that they will become a part of our daily experience


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luiy's curator insight, February 20, 2013 6:10 AM
In his novel Idoru, William Gibson entertained the idea of a hologram governed byan AI. Idoru or Idol is “a holographic personality -construct, a congeries of softwareagents, the creation of information- designers.” [9] It is an AI, a computer programmewhich simulates a female human being. It adapts and learns through interacting withhumans and manifests itself as a generated, animated, projected hologram. A person-alized version of Idoru named Rei Toei exists online in different forms that corre-spond to preferences of each user. Only when performing in public, her appearance isa result of consensual decision of users. Her effect on audiences is so strong thatLaney, a character hired to objectively analyze the information she generates, had toremind himself in her presence that “she is not flesh; she is information.” [10] Whatused to be science fiction in just over a decade ago in Gibson‟s novel is now realized in several different forms, i.e. several different holographic projected Idols such as vocaloids Hatsune Miku and Aimi Eguchi, for example. Hatsune Miku is Yamaha‟s synthetic sound generator popularized through Hatsune‟s visual iconography. As a holographic celebrity, she performs in concerts with live musicians. These virtualconstructs not only exist in physical space but the real people in the real world attrib-ute a status of personae and celebrities to them and treat them accordingly. The keycharacteristic of all Idoru characters is that they are “ both real and fictional: it is real in terms of having material effects on people‟s lives and playing a role in the formation of digital lifestyles, and it is fictional in insofar as it operates in conjunction with an elaborate fantasy narrative.” [20] Apart from being a materialization of what Gibson has conceptualized in fiction,Idoru constructs can also be observed as a materialization of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari‟s concept of “body without organs” [5] in both metaphorical and literal sense. On the one hand they are the hollow bodies but still bodies which inhabit thephysical realm and gain meaning through interactions with people and, on the otherhand, they are a fluid substrate caught in the process of endless self replication .....
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Make students curators

"...we could have students engage with artifacts, historic sites, landscapes, photographs, memorials, paintings, political cartoons, and actual people, as well as with more traditional documents. We could have them select a topic or theme to research as a class, and then create an online exhibition featuring these objects, places, documents, and more...."


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Deborah Arnold's curator insight, February 8, 2013 3:07 PM

Very practical advice on how curation can be used to develop critical and creative thinking, in particular the "cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections"

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How Teens Do Research in the Digital World | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

How Teens Do Research in the Digital World | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project | my digital literacy | Scoop.it
A survey of Advanced Placement and National Writing Project teachers finds that teens’ research habits are changing in the digital age...

Via Joyce Valenza, Susan van Gelder
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Rescooped by Erin Luong from Digital Literacy - Education
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Major Changes to Copyright On the Way!

Major Changes to Copyright On the Way! | my digital literacy | Scoop.it

The Intellectual Property Office (IPO) has published the government's intentions for 'modernising copyright' in a document, aptly called Modernising Copyright. It details many changes including some to the fundamental Education Exceptions to Copyright which are to be enacted through secondary legislation by October 2013.

 

Format shifting - moving data from one platform/device to another for personal or study purposes will be permitted.

Copyright Exceptions for education will be 'media neutral' - they will encompass all media - films, music, etc - not just text-based media.

Teachers will be permitted to use materials within the Exceptions for teaching to 'illustrate' their teaching.

The Exceptions will cover VLEs and institutionally managed authenticated services.

There are a number of new measures to assist archives and libraries perform their work of supporting learning and teaching in the digital age.

Further measures to support 'Disability' are also being introduced.


Via Anthony Beal
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Rescooped by Erin Luong from Etmooc
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Emerging Student Patterns in MOOCs: A Graphical View -

Emerging Student Patterns in MOOCs: A Graphical View - | my digital literacy | Scoop.it

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Karen Young's curator insight, March 13, 2013 5:02 PM

Comments at the base of the article highlight how MOOC participation is still trying to be defined and catalogued.

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AfroEdge - First digital literacy course launched in Trinidad to commemorate International Women's Day | World News | Latest News

AfroEdge - Live.Share.ConnectAfroEdge aims to bring you the latest news,gossip and business information.Get involved with our Bloggers and forum as well as our Magazine Articles.
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Rescooped by Erin Luong from Digital Literacy for my students
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What is digital literacy?

What is digital literacy? | my digital literacy | Scoop.it
Digital literacy is the topic that made the ETMOOC learning space so irresistible to me… I think as educators we spout off about wanting our students to be digitally literate, but not many of...

Via Pierre Levy
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Sally Tilley's curator insight, March 16, 2013 5:56 PM

An interesting summary of the challenges implementing digital literacy imposes on curriulum planning and teachers

Patricia Sánchez Marrou's curator insight, March 22, 2013 9:47 AM

Importante revisar...

Sidnei Campos Pinto's comment, May 3, 2013 12:11 PM
The work of teaching and learning in young and adult literacy, digital inclusion, education for the media, has the role of providing people in vulnerable conditions in the central region of São Paulo, in Brazil, the recovery of full citizenship and the practice of justice social.
Rescooped by Erin Luong from Media literacy, digital learning, active ageing and technologies
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Twitter / LearningCurve_: Elements of Literacy: not just ...

RT @LearningCurve_: Elements of Literacy: not just reading and writing! http://t.co/5T3dPP3sen


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Rescooped by Erin Luong from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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How Minecraft is Teaching a Generation About Teamwork & the Environment | Getting Smart

How Minecraft is Teaching a Generation About Teamwork & the Environment | Getting Smart | my digital literacy | Scoop.it

Minecraft, as it stands, has sold around twenty million copies across multiple platforms. It’s arguably one of the most successful games of all time, and a demonstration of the fact that videogames do not have to be sexually charged gore-fests in order to be accepted by gamers en masse. Summarily, it’s a game in which you are placed in a natural, procedurally-generated environment, and you must cut down trees, mine stone and ore, and generally manipulate your environment to build a home for yourself or go on a journey.

 

Its building mechanic is simple – break a block, and most of the time, you’ll get a block to place. Placing blocks becomes a LEGO-esque activity, and immediately the game’s appeal to the world’s youth is obvious. But it’s not just about allowing them to put things together however they like – Minecraft has the potential to teach children quite a considerable amount about interacting with others, and how to treat their environment.

 

In terms of interacting with other children, Minecraft sets down very clear rules – largely, that there are none, and just like in real life, these children must choose to work in teams, despite the fact that being aggressive or selfish may look like the immediately easier option. A house is built faster with four kids working together, and the game becomes a lot easier once night falls (when the monsters appear, furthering its appeal and relevance to an age bracket still scared of the dark) when those four are guarding each other, as well as themselves.

 

It’s also not a bad way to teach each child about how precious and finite the environment and its resources are. While Minecraft will extend to eight times the earth’s surface area (with each block seen as a metre cubed in real life), all resources are finite. Iron ore does not re-spawn, and neither does coal. Students have the choice of either going further and further out to get resources, or to create sustainable sources of energy and other blocks and items themselves.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by Erin Luong from Digital citizens in school
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A Bill of Rights and Principles for Learning in the Digital Age

A Bill of Rights and Principles for Learning in the Digital Age | my digital literacy | Scoop.it
PreambleWork
on this Bill of Rights & Principles began in Palo Alto, California,
on December 14, 2012

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Reflecting on Digital Literacy

Reflecting on Digital Literacy | my digital literacy | Scoop.it
In an effort to support my teachers in reflecting more deeply on their practice I've been using this teacher self-assessment tool since September. It is based on our provinces Teacher Quality Stand...
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From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism

From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism - Read book online.

Via Cathleen Nardi, luiy, Andrea Naranjo
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hybrids & subversives: the cyborg as teacher | theory.cribchronicles.com

teachers are instruments of the educational system. and in the 21st century, teachers are required to be instruments of technologies, too.

Via Andrea Naranjo
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luiy's curator insight, March 2, 2013 5:00 PM

I began teaching online in 1998, the same year I encountered Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto (1991) for the first time. Her cyborg – partial, ironic, always hybrid – offered a model for identity that helped me navigate that new environment. The cyborg’s emphasis on breaking down binaries enabled and encouraged me to grapple with some of the institutional and technocratic power relations that shaped our online learning context, in ways that have continued to influence my understanding of my educational practice and my research to this day.

 

The cyborg teacher is a hybrid, both an instrument of the schooling system and yet subversive to it: the cyborg teacher is a learner too. Teaching from the cyborg point of view helped me frame my digital classroom not as “less” or “more” than conventional learning spaces, but instead as a site for building ties of curiosity and affinity. It helped me escape the concept of the virtual and approach my online work very much as real; human and technological, both.

 

Now, fifteen years down the road, I see the cyborg particularly as a metaphor for networked identities. These are the kinds of selves cultivated when people integrate online social networks into their personal and professional practices not just as consumers but producers: when they blog, tweet, filter, curate, and share ideas within networks of shared interests.

In a time when our technological platforms are primarily corporate-owned and even mundane daily practices like bank card usage expose us to constant digital surveillance, the cyborg strikes me as a particularly important figure. A teacher by example, she collapses the binary distinctions our media narratives are so eager to create about social technologies.

The message of the cyborg, as I see it, is that we are complicit, part of this digital world. But we are not necessarily subject to its terms: in an age in which human agency can seem dwarfed by the innumerable invisible digital systems we interact with, the cyborg – illegitimate offspring of the very things she subverts – stands for me as a figure of hope.

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The need for media literacy in the digital age | The Blue Review

The need for media literacy in the digital age | The Blue Review | my digital literacy | Scoop.it

Today’s students are not being equipped with the critical thinking and analysis skills they need to successfully navigate our media-saturated environment. Time spent consuming media, now up to nearly eight hours a day, continues to increase, but students often are poorly versed in analyzing and understanding different media messages and formats. They prefer to see the world of media messages as simple and straightforward, to be taken at face value, according to recent research in the field of media literacy. While students express confidence that media messages have clear primary meanings and sources that can be easily identified, media literacy demands nuanced thinking about message creators as well as their goals and values.

 

As policymakers grapple over how to deploy technology in classrooms, they should beware of producing generations of students drowning in digital devices without enough good ideas about what to do with them.

 

Since the emergence of the modern media literacy movement in the early 1990s, scholars and educators have struggled to define the field and establish standards for what it means to be media literate. A growing body of research, including my own work with colleagues published in the Journal of Media Literacy Education and Journalism and Mass Communication Educator, finds support for the idea that young people, while sometimes fluent in technologies used in and out of the classroom, often struggle to decipher media messages. But what exactly should students learn and what are the best methods for teaching media literacy? How can teachers know when they have been effective? How can teachers help students become motivated and engaged rather than disaffected and cynical?

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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21 Literacy Resources For The Digital Teacher

21 Literacy Resources For The Digital Teacher http://t.co/OBXwUggk3h
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