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An aggregator for (oAnth's) daily interests in humanities, arts, science, geography, economics, politics - academia, education - activism, advocacy - itec, free software, open source, open access, open knowledge - languages in use: mostly EN, FR, DE
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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from Cinéma et immigration
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Les Petits Pas- Lardux Films - Film documentaire 2009

Les Petits Pas- Lardux Films - Film documentaire 2009 | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

Long métrage / documentaires /

64 minutes, Vidéo Numérique 16/9eme,

un film de Agnes Nassery

une production Lardux Films en partenariat avec TVM Cinéplume, avec le soutien du CNC Cosip.

/ 2009

La Cité des Francs-Moisins à Saint Denis, pendant un stage d’alphabétisation et de couture. Rencontre avec Mariama, Mariam, Sougandi, Zaïna, Diarrah, et ... Françoise.

Elles veulent apprendre à lire et à écrire. Elles veulent devenir autonomes, travailler, exister enfin, et aider leurs enfants à réussir. Petits pas en avant imperceptibles à nos yeux, immenses pour elles. A la fin du stage qu’auront-elles acquis ? Seront elles plus confiantes, mieux armées ?


Via Médiathèque Abdelmalek Sayad
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Google-Informed Pattern-Hunting and Pattern-Defining: Implication for Language Pedagogy


Via Pascual Pérez-Paredes
oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"'s insight:

 

 

 

 

 

Keywords: GIPH, GIPD, GALL, concordancer, web corpus, DL, DDL, natural

 

[...]

 

Abstract


The use of the Web as a corpus and Google as a concordancer, has been regarded as one of the promising areas that has a potential for revolutionizing language pedagogy in general, and second language (L2) writing, in particular. More specifically, it is believed that the functions of Google-Informed Pattern-Hunting (GIPH) and Google-Informed Pattern-Defining (GIPD) can promote natural L2 writing through Discovery Learning (DL) and Data Driven Learning (DDL), however, these advantages have mostly been given lip services than tested with first hand empirical studies, and only more recently some studies have been undertaken in this vein. Focusing on L2, this article explored how and to what extent this great potential of GIPH and GIPD has been recognized by reviewing the related studies, thereby some factors and themes (such as Learning Style, Training, Naturalness, Tidiness, Speed, Number of Retrieval, and Proficiency) have been extracted and elaborated on. However, due to the novelty of the area, the themes are mostly the outcome of researchers’ descriptions and interpretations than empirical studies. The inclusion criteria for the present review were studies that focus on the application of the Web as a corpus and Google as a concordance for language learning and L2 writing based on researchers’ and learners’ evaluation of it. Seven studies included in the present review show that learners’ use of GIPH and GIPD champions the promotion of their language learning and L2 writing, providing that proper training and scaffolding are provided. Future studies are also recommended based on the gaps and deficiencies identified in the reviewed researches.

 

[...]

 

 

// open access - cc licence - source URL: http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ass/article/view/25295

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Secrets of human speech uncovered | KurzweilAI

Secrets of human speech uncovered | KurzweilAI | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
Top: vocal tract schematics for three consonants (/b/, /d/, /g/), produced by occlusion at the lips, tongue tip, and tongue body, respectively (red arrow).

Via Apmel
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A short intro to Corpus Linguistics

A short intro to Corpus Linguistics | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
What is Corpus Linguistics? Corpus linguistics is the use of digitalized text (corpus) or texts, usually naturally occurring material, in the analysis of language (linguistics). Techniques used inc...

Via Pascual Pérez-Paredes
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An automated ‘time machine’ to reconstruct ancient languages | KurzweilAI

An automated ‘time machine’ to reconstruct ancient languages | KurzweilAI | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
Computer scientists have reconstructed ancient Proto-Austronesian, which gave rise to languages spoken in Polynesia, among other places (credit: A.

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Language Is a Virus: How Loanwords Move the...

Language Is a Virus: How Loanwords Move the World’s Tongues There are an estimated 6,700 to 6,900 languages in the world today, and they drift through the air like a meteorological echo — Hello!... (#Linguistics FTW.

Via Athanasios Karavasilis
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Charles Sanders Peirce: La sémiotique

Charles Sanders Peirce: La sémiotique | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
La sémiotique de Peirce : une théorie sémiotique de Peirce. Résumé, Théorie, Application, Références et Exercices.

Via René Z., yves deligne
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Voyant Tools: Reveal Your Texts

Voyant Tools: Reveal Your Texts | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

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Pascual Pérez-Paredes's curator insight, January 25, 2013 5:44 AM

Easy to use, powerful visualizing tools and highly cuestomizable.

Shona Whyte's curator insight, January 27, 2013 1:52 AM

This tool provides a Wordle-style cloud to illustrate the frequency of words in a text, plus word and word frequency counts.  Paste in one or more urls.

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subrealism: the biological origin of linguistic diversity

subrealism: the biological origin of linguistic diversity | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
Just as reading relies on neural mechanisms that pre-date the emergence of writing [17], so perhaps language has evolved to rely on pre-existing brain systems. However, there is more agreement about the origin of linguistic ...

Via Athanasios Karavasilis
oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"'s insight:

[...]

 

plosone - http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0048029

 

(Abstract) In contrast with animal communication systems, diversity is characteristic of almost every aspect of human language. Languages variously employ tones, clicks, or manual signs to signal differences in meaning; some languages lack the noun-verb distinction (e.g., Straits Salish), whereas others have a proliferation of fine-grained syntactic categories (e.g., Tzeltal); and some languages do without morphology (e.g., Mandarin), while others pack a whole sentence into a single word (e.g., Cayuga). A challenge for evolutionary biology is to reconcile the diversity of languages with the high degree of biological uniformity of their speakers. Here, we model processes of language change and geographical dispersion and find a consistent pressure for flexible learning, irrespective of the language being spoken. This pressure arises because flexible learners can best cope with the observed high rates of linguistic change associated with divergent cultural evolution following human migration. Thus, rather than genetic adaptations for specific aspects of language, such as recursion, the coevolution of genes and fast-changing linguistic structure provides the biological basis for linguistic diversity. Only biological adaptations for flexible learning combined with cultural evolution can explain how each child has the potential to learn any human language.

 

[...]

 

http://subrealism.blogspot.de/2013/03/the-biological-origin-of-linguistic.html

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Institut für Softwaretechnik und Theoretische Informatik: 2013_04_22


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Pascual Pérez-Paredes's curator insight, March 3, 2013 5:21 AM
Opinion mining and lexical affect sensing
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La lettre et/ou l'image : ce qui est premier ?

Entendant Michel Serres, parcourant le livre de Raffaele Simone (Pris dans la Toile, L’esprit au temps du web, le débat Gallimard trad., 2012), après avoir lu l’entretien entre Boris Cyrulnik et Denis Peschanski (Mémoire et traumatisme : l’individu et la fabrique des grands récits, INA 2012), une question vient à l’esprit : la lettre ou l’image, Qu’est-ce qui est premier ? Autrement dit on parle d’une civilisation de l’oral, une de l’écrit et une troisième du numérique, mais quelle est la place de l’image ? Autrement dit l’image a-t-elle autant de force civilisatrice que l’écrit, le mot, la lettre. Dans la même ligne, Pierre Babin et Marie France Kouloumdjian s’interrogeaient en 1980 sur « les nouveaux modes de comprendre » (Le Centurion, 1983), nous montrent combien nous avons négligé l’image au cours de notre histoire et combien sa mise en avant, via les écrans de cinéma, de télévision et d’ordinateur, nous invite à en mesurer l’importance.


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Verb Phrase book published

Verb Phrase book published | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

The grammar of English is often thought to be stable over time. However a new book, edited by Bas Aarts, Joanne Close, Geoffrey Leech and Sean Wallis, The Verb Phrase in English: investigating recent language change with corpora (Cambridge University Press, 2013) presents a body of research from linguists that shows that using natural language corpora one can find changes within a core element of grammar, the Verb Phrase, over a span of decades rather than centuries.

 

The book draws from papers first presented at a symposium on the verb phrase organised for the Survey of English Usage’s 50th anniversary and on research from the Changing English Verb Phrase project.

 
Via Pascual Pérez-Paredes
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Pascual Pérez-Paredes's curator insight, February 19, 2013 2:20 PM

Thanks to Costas Gabrielatos.

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Corpus colossal

Corpus colossal | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
LINGUISTS must often correct lay people's misconceptions of what they do. Their job is not to be experts in “correct” grammar, ready at any moment to smack your...

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Pascual Pérez-Paredes's curator insight, February 13, 2013 1:15 AM

Raw material is surprisingly elusive. Getting people to speak naturally in a controlled study is hard. Eavesdropping is difficult, time-consuming and invasive of privacy. For these reasons, linguists often rely on a “corpus” of language, a body of recorded speech and writing, nowadays usually computerised.

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When physicists do linguistics

When physicists do linguistics | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
When physicists look at language, what do they see? For the five experts in physics who authored a recent paper in the journal Scientific Reports, language looks very much like a gas, with words bouncing around like particles.

Via Athanasios Karavasilis
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World Maps of Language Families

World Maps of Language Families | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
For teaching a class on the history and geography of the world’s major language families, good linguistic maps are essential. Unfortunately, serviceable maps that depict only language families are difficult to find.

 

 


Via Athanasios Karavasilis, oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"
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Pense-t-on en mots ou en images ?

Pense-t-on en mots ou en images ? | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

On a souvent affirmé que c’est le langage qui fait la pensée. Et si cette idée était tout simplement fausse ?

 

 

// ajouté par oAnth, même source:

 

[...]

 

Que se passe-t-il dans la tête d’un sourd-muet en train de se masturber ? Voilà la curieuse question que le vénérable George Steiner pose dans son essai Les Livres que je n’ai pas écrits (2008). Cette question semble revêtir pour lui une importance capitale. « Il serait extrêmement difficile d’obtenir sur ce point des informations fiables. Je n’ai connaissance d’aucune enquête systématique. Pourtant, la question est d’une importance cruciale. » Pourquoi s’intéresser à une question aussi saugrenue ? Parce que, selon l’auteur, la réponse pourrait éclairer la nature des liens entre émotions, langage et pensée. Si la pensée est le fruit du langage, qu’advient-il pour un sourd-muet qui ne possède pas de langage ?

Ici, G. Steiner commet une double erreur. La première est de considérer qu’un sourd-muet est privé de langage. Or, chacun sait que les sourds-muets utilisent un langage de signes qui n’a rien à envier en finesse, en rigueur et en richesse au langage parlé. De plus, les sourds-muets peuvent parfaitement lire, écrire ou raconter leurs expériences comme vous et moi. Ce que fit par exemple Pierre Desloges, un artisan relieur qui publia en 1779 ses Observations d’un sourd-muet. D’autres le feront après lui (A. Peletier et Y. Delaporte, Moi, Armand, né sourd et muet, 2002).

La seconde erreur est plus fondamentale. Elle porte sur les liens entre langage et pensée. G. Steiner reprend cette idée largement répandue selon laquelle la pensée et le langage sont une seule et même chose. « On s’accorde à reconnaître que les capacités du langage à faire de la réalité un objet de classification, d’abstraction, de métaphore – si tant est qu’il existe un langage “extérieur” – constituent non seulement l’essence de l’homme mais sa séparation primordiale d’avec l’animalité (à nouveau, le cas du sourd-muet incarne ce qui est peut-être une énigme essentielle). Nous parlons donc nous pensons, nous pensons donc nous parlons (…). Le “verbe” qui était au commencement (…) fut le début de l’humanité. » (ibid.)

 

[...]


Via carol s. (caravan café), Vincent Mignerot, Dominique Demartini
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Marco Bertolini's curator insight, January 17, 2013 4:09 AM

Une question plus essentielle et moins simple qu'il n'y paraît.

 

Pour les sciences humaines, l'équivalence langage-pensée est une idée reçue qui ne se discute guère.   Et pourtant, les indices sont nombreux qui remettent cette évidence en question.

 

"Le langage ne servirait donc qu’à jeter des ponts entre les univers mentaux. Mais il ne permettra jamais de les rendre totalement transparents les uns aux autres."

Dominique Demartini's comment, January 17, 2013 3:56 PM
"L'intuition philosophique" de Bergson est à mon avis indispensable pour aborder la question. Bergson pensait par images et il faisait tout son possible pour que son discours les relaie et suscite chez le lecteur une "intuition" équivalente à la sienne. Voir aussi les textes que Deleuze lui a consacré...
Katia Duchateau's curator insight, January 17, 2013 4:16 PM

Intérêts pour l'expression "images véhiculées"!