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An aggregator for (oAnth's) daily interests in humanities, arts, science, geography, economics, politics - academia, education - activism, advocacy - itec, free software, open source, open access, open knowledge - languages in use: mostly EN, FR, DE
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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from Égypt-actus
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After droughts and flood, project aims to preserve Sinai mountain gardens

After droughts and flood, project aims to preserve Sinai mountain gardens | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

By Louise Sarant (Egypt independent) 

Around St. Catherine’s Monastery, encircled by the high South Sinai mountains, lie hundreds of Bedouin gardens nested in the nearby wadis, or valleys. These gardens, which were initially built during the Byzantine period by monks, hermits and settlers from around the Mediterranean, have been the responsibility of the Jabaleya Bedouins for more than a century.

A severe drought that lasted for years in the peninsula, coupled with an unprecedented amount of precipitation and snow that fell over the mountains early this year, has badly damaged some of these precious shrines to biodiversity.

Because the houses are built of stone and rooftops from a mix of rocks and sand, the continuous rainfall pushed against the roofs, which finally collapsed under the strain.

With many Bedouin families relying on these mountain orchards for their livelihood, the collapse of the buildings and fences, and the destruction of the trees was a disaster. To finance the rebuilding of these enclaves, members of the Jabaleya tribe have now launched an alternative tourism project inviting volunteers to participate in restoration efforts.

Entitled “Help Rebuild the Bedouin Gardens and Discover the Sinai High Mountains,” the project is still in its early stages but tribe members plan to bring visitors to the gardens to stay with local families and help with reconstruction work. They will also be asked to provide a donation directly to gardeners to hire workers, buy building materials and cover transportation costs.

“These gardens provide livelihoods for us, as there are no job opportunities in the city,” says Sayed Musa, the Bedouin man from the area in charge of the project, who has 10 years experience as a safari and trekking guide. “The situation for many families is now extremely tense. They have lost all their income and are no longer self-sufficient for food.”

More : http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/after-droughts-and-flood-project-aims-preserve-sinai-mountain-gardens


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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from Science and Global Education Trends
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An inconvenient truth: More polar bears alive today than 40 years ago

An inconvenient truth: More polar bears alive today than 40 years ago | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

 

[...]

 

Author Zac Unger was originally drawn to the arctic circle to write a “mournful elegy” about how global warming was decimating the polar bear populations. He was surprised to find that the polar bears were not in such dire straits after all.

“There are far more polar bears alive today than there were 40 years ago,” Unger told NPR in an interview about his new book, “Never Look a Polar Bear in The Eye.” “There are about 25,000 polar bears alive today worldwide. In 1973, there was a global hunting ban. So once hunting was dramatically reduced, the population exploded.”

 

[...]

 


Via Thomas Wentzel, Kathy Bosiak
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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from Amazing Science
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Fracking and Shale Oil Won’t Lead to U.S. Energy Independence

Fracking and Shale Oil Won’t Lead to U.S. Energy Independence | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

The United States could see a surge in oil production that could make it the world’s leading oil producer within a decade, according to a new report from the International Energy Agency. But that lead will likely be temporary, and it still won’t allow the United States to stop importing oil. Barring technological breakthroughs in oil production and major reductions in consumption, the United States will need to rely on oil from outside its borders for the foreseeable future.

 

This week’s IEA report predicts that a relatively new technology for extracting oil from shale rock could make the United States the world’s leading oil producer within a decade, beating the current leader, Saudi Arabia. The idea that the U.S. could overtake Saudi Arabia, even temporarily, is a stunning development after years of seemingly inexorable declines in domestic oil production. U.S. production had fallen from 10 million barrels a day in the 1980s to 6.9 barrels per day in 2008, even as consumption increased from 15.7 million barrels per day in 1985 to 19.5 million barrels per day in 2008. The IEA estimates that production could reach 11.1 million barrels per day by 2020, almost entirely because of increases in the production of shale oil, which is extracted using the same horizontal drilling and fracking techniques that have flooded the U.S. with cheap natural gas.

 

As of the end of 2011, production had already increased to 8.1 million barrels per day, almost entirely because of shale oil. Production from two major shale resources in the U.S.—the Bakken formation in North Dakota and Montana and the Eagle Ford shale in Texas, now total about 900,000 barrels per day. In comparison, Saudi Arabia is expected to produce 10.6 million barrels per day in 2020.The shale oil resource, however, is limited. The IEA expects production to start gradually declining by the mid-2020s, at which time Saudi Arabia will reclaim the top spot.

 

Shale oil is creating a surge in U.S. oil production in part because it’s easy to find, says David Houseknecht, a scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey. The oil is spread over large areas, compared to the relatively small pockets of more conventional oil deposits in the United States. So whereas wildcatters drilling for conventional oil might come up empty two-thirds of the time or more, over 95 percent of shale oil wells strike oil.

 

Just how much shale oil can be produced—and how fast—depends heavily on two factors: the price of oil, and how easy it is to overcome possible local objections to oil fracking, says Richard Sears, a former executive at Royal Dutch Shell and a visiting scientist at MIT. Oil shale costs significantly more to produce than oil in Saudi Arabia and many other parts of the world, so for oil companies to go after this resource, oil prices need to stay relatively high. It’s hard to put a firm number on it, but Sears estimates that $50 to $60 a barrel would be enough, compared to the $85 per barrel price of oil now. Houseknecht puts the cost of production at closer to $70 a barrel. Although costs for producing conventional oil in the Middle East also vary, they typically don’t change more than $10 per barrel.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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James Krall's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:42 AM

I really think the U.S. should stop importing so much oil from the middle-east because you never know when they could possibly cut us off due to political differences or something. At least if we were to produce some and import some they'd make the price at the pump go lower for us. Which would boost the economy. But I think that if we are to become a leading producer of oil in the world, I think we should make ourselfs independant in ways of producing energy for ourselves. I think it would just lead to less problems and make it easier for everybody. 

Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from The virtual life
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An automated ‘time machine’ to reconstruct ancient languages | KurzweilAI

An automated ‘time machine’ to reconstruct ancient languages | KurzweilAI | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
Computer scientists have reconstructed ancient Proto-Austronesian, which gave rise to languages spoken in Polynesia, among other places (credit: A.

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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from Philosophie en France
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Édouard Glissant entre Derrida et Khatibi, par Boniface Mongo-Mboussa

Édouard Glissant entre Derrida et Khatibi, par Boniface Mongo-Mboussa | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

Du 23 au 25 avril 1992, Édouard Glissant et David Wills organisent un colloque à l’université d’État de Louisiane aux États-Unis. Jacques Derrida est présent. Il prononce une communication, qui deviendra l’un de ses textes les plus célèbres : Le Monolinguisme de l’Autre.

 

à lire en plus: http://mondesfrancophones.com/espaces/afriques/edouard-glissant-entre-derrida-et-khatibi/


Via dm
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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from oAnth-miscellaneous
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Little Ice Age was caused by volcanism | newsblog - blogs.nature 2012-01-31| offene Ablage: nothing to hide

Little Ice Age was caused by volcanism | newsblog - blogs.nature 2012-01-31| offene Ablage: nothing to hide | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

orignial URL: http://feeds.nature.com/~r/news/rss/the_great_beyond/~3/5EBOBiRQRgg/little-ice-age-was-caused-by-volcanism.html

 

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Some of the iconic winter landscapes by Pieter Bruegel the Elder are more than just fine examples of sixteenth-century Dutch art. Paintings such as Bruegel’s Hunters in the Snow (1565) also serve as vivid evidence for the ‘Little Ice Age’, a period of cold climate conditions and glacier advances in Europe and elsewhere that lasted from the late Middle Ages until the nineteenth century.

 

There has been quite some debate over the years about the precise onset and the physical causes of this extended cold spell, with one school of thought favouring low solar activity during the ‘Maunder Minimum’ and another the cooling effect of big volcanic eruptions.

 

A paper published today in Geophysical Research Letters may put the solar-trigger hypothesis at rest. Gifford Miller of the University of Colorado in Boulder and his colleagues suggest that the Little Ice Age began abruptly between 1275 and 1300 AD following four large sulfur-rich explosive eruptions, most likely in the tropics, over a mere 50-year period.

 

[...]

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