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An aggregator for (oAnth's) daily interests in humanities, arts, science, geography, economics, politics - academia, education - activism, advocacy - itec, free software, open source, open access, open knowledge - languages in use: mostly EN, FR, DE
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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from Politics economics and society
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From Contagion to Incoherence: Toward a model of the unfolding Eurozone Crisis

From Contagion to Incoherence: Toward a model of the unfolding Eurozone Crisis | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

 

 

 

 

 

 

This post offers readers a fully-fledged analytical model of the unfolding Eurozone Crisis. It begins with a macro-economic analysis of the Crisis’ causes and then, importantly, models the feedback between Europe’s institutional and policy responses and the contagion process that began with Greece. For the fully-fledged (wonkish) version of the paper,

 

 

 

click here ( http://varoufakis.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/from-contagion-to-incoherence-a-simple-macroeconomic-model-of-the-eurozone-crisis1.pdf ). What follows below is a maths-free summary of each of the paper’s sections.

 

[...]

 

 


Via Ioannis
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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from Applied linguistics and knowledge engineering
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Google-Informed Pattern-Hunting and Pattern-Defining: Implication for Language Pedagogy


Via Pascual Pérez-Paredes
oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"'s insight:

 

 

 

 

 

Keywords: GIPH, GIPD, GALL, concordancer, web corpus, DL, DDL, natural

 

[...]

 

Abstract


The use of the Web as a corpus and Google as a concordancer, has been regarded as one of the promising areas that has a potential for revolutionizing language pedagogy in general, and second language (L2) writing, in particular. More specifically, it is believed that the functions of Google-Informed Pattern-Hunting (GIPH) and Google-Informed Pattern-Defining (GIPD) can promote natural L2 writing through Discovery Learning (DL) and Data Driven Learning (DDL), however, these advantages have mostly been given lip services than tested with first hand empirical studies, and only more recently some studies have been undertaken in this vein. Focusing on L2, this article explored how and to what extent this great potential of GIPH and GIPD has been recognized by reviewing the related studies, thereby some factors and themes (such as Learning Style, Training, Naturalness, Tidiness, Speed, Number of Retrieval, and Proficiency) have been extracted and elaborated on. However, due to the novelty of the area, the themes are mostly the outcome of researchers’ descriptions and interpretations than empirical studies. The inclusion criteria for the present review were studies that focus on the application of the Web as a corpus and Google as a concordance for language learning and L2 writing based on researchers’ and learners’ evaluation of it. Seven studies included in the present review show that learners’ use of GIPH and GIPD champions the promotion of their language learning and L2 writing, providing that proper training and scaffolding are provided. Future studies are also recommended based on the gaps and deficiencies identified in the reviewed researches.

 

[...]

 

 

// open access - cc licence - source URL: http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ass/article/view/25295

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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from oAnth-miscellaneous
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Little Ice Age was caused by volcanism | newsblog - blogs.nature 2012-01-31| offene Ablage: nothing to hide

Little Ice Age was caused by volcanism | newsblog - blogs.nature 2012-01-31| offene Ablage: nothing to hide | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

orignial URL: http://feeds.nature.com/~r/news/rss/the_great_beyond/~3/5EBOBiRQRgg/little-ice-age-was-caused-by-volcanism.html

 

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Some of the iconic winter landscapes by Pieter Bruegel the Elder are more than just fine examples of sixteenth-century Dutch art. Paintings such as Bruegel’s Hunters in the Snow (1565) also serve as vivid evidence for the ‘Little Ice Age’, a period of cold climate conditions and glacier advances in Europe and elsewhere that lasted from the late Middle Ages until the nineteenth century.

 

There has been quite some debate over the years about the precise onset and the physical causes of this extended cold spell, with one school of thought favouring low solar activity during the ‘Maunder Minimum’ and another the cooling effect of big volcanic eruptions.

 

A paper published today in Geophysical Research Letters may put the solar-trigger hypothesis at rest. Gifford Miller of the University of Colorado in Boulder and his colleagues suggest that the Little Ice Age began abruptly between 1275 and 1300 AD following four large sulfur-rich explosive eruptions, most likely in the tropics, over a mere 50-year period.

 

[...]

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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from Economics: Its History and Politics
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The Boom Not The Slump: The Right Time for Austerity?


Via pdeppisch
oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"'s insight:

 

[...]

 

A recent paper by Alberto F. Alesina and Silvia Ardagna
(2009), “Large Changes in Fiscal Policy: Taxes Versus
Spending” (henceforth A & A), looks at a cross section of
deficit reduction policies among different countries. It
examines examples where large-scale deficit reduction is
associated with economic expansion and where the
debt-to-GDP ratio falls in the medium-term (3 years
a#er the adjustment). Based on this research, many
popular commentators suggest that the U.S. can adopt
such a policy and grow.1


However, upon a further examination of the data such a
conclusion is unmerited. The overwhelming majority of
the episodes used by A & A did not see deficit reduction
in the middle of a slump. Where they did, it o#en
resulted in a decline in the subsequent growth rate or an
increase in the debt-to-GDP ratio. Of the 26 episodes
that they identify as ‘expansionary’, in virtually none did
the country a) reduce the deficit when the economy was
in a slump and b) increase growth rates while reducing
the debt-to-GDP ratio. The sole example not covered
by those two qualifiers can be explained by a
combination of two policy maneuvers that are not easily
available to the U.S. at the moment: currency
depreciation and interest rate reduction.

 

[...]

 

open access: http://www.rooseveltinstitute.org/sites/all/files/not_the_time_for_austerity.pdf

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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from Public Datasets - Open Data -
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Error and attack tolerance of complex networks : Article : Nature

Error and attack tolerance of complex networks : Article : Nature | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it
Nature is the international weekly journal of science: a magazine style journal that publishes full-length research papers in all disciplines of science, as well as News and Views, reviews, news, features, commentaries, web focuses and more,...

Via luiy
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luiy's curator insight, March 4, 2013 7:07 AM

Many complex systems display a surprising degree of tolerance against errors. For example, relatively simple organisms grow, persist and reproduce despite drastic pharmaceutical or environmental interventions, an error tolerance attributed to the robustness of the underlying metabolic network1. Complex communication networks2display a surprising degree of robustness: although key components regularly malfunction, local failures rarely lead to the loss of the global information-carrying ability of the network. The stability of these and other complex systems is often attributed to the redundant wiring of the functional web defined by the systems' components. Here we demonstrate that error tolerance is not shared by all redundant systems: it is displayed only by a class of inhomogeneously wired networks, called scale-free networks, which include the World-Wide Web3, 4, 5, the Internet6, social networks7 and cells8. We find that such networks display an unexpected degree of robustness, the ability of their nodes to communicate being unaffected even by unrealistically high failure rates. However, error tolerance comes at a high price in that these networks are extremely vulnerable to attacks (that is, to the selection and removal of a few nodes that play a vital role in maintaining the network's connectivity). Such error tolerance and attack vulnerability are generic properties of communication networks.