oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts
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oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts
An aggregator for (oAnth's) daily interests in humanities, arts, science, geography, economics, politics - academia, education - activism, advocacy - itec, free software, open source, open access, open knowledge - languages in use: mostly EN, FR, DE
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Climate change and water mismanagement parch Egypt

Climate change and water mismanagement parch Egypt | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

Climate change, a fast growing population, ill-designed infrastructure, high levels of pollution and lack of law enforcement have made Egypt a country thirsty for water — both in terms of quantity and quality.

The River Nile, which is considered poor by many experts and hydrologists, lies at lower altitude than the rest of the country. Massive electric pumps extract the water from the river’s bed and canals and direct it to industry, agriculture and for individual water use.

A significant portion of the water contained in Lake Nasser’s 5,000 square kilometer basin is lost to evaporation, while old networks of leaking pipes also deprive the country of satisfactory access to its most important resource: water.

In order to debate water scarcity in Egypt, its causes, and how climate change makes the issue more pressing than ever, as well as looking to solutions, a panel of experts were invited to participate in the 13th Cairo Climate Talk last week entitled “Growing Thirst: Sustainable Water Solutions for Egypt.”

Tarek Kotb, the First Assistant Minister in the Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation, and a member of the panel discussion, talked about the dwindling water share per capita with a sense of urgency. “Every year, the Egyptian population grows by 1.8 million, while the annual quota of Nile water allocated to Egypt, 55 billion cubic meters, has remained unchanged since the 1959 Nile Water Agreement,” he says.

While Egyptians in the 1960s could enjoy a water share per capita of 2800 cubic meters for all purposes, the current share has dropped to 660 cubic meters today—below the international standard defining water poverty of 1000 cubic meters.

Kotb estimates that Egypt is gradually going to leave the stage of water scarcity and enter a phase of drastic water stress in the next 40 years, if no sustainable water management is put in place.

“By 2050, there will be about 160 million Egyptians and only 370 cubic meters of water per capita,” he says. While Egypt has other options for its water needs, such as tapping into groundwater basins and desalinating sea-water, the bulk of water is still extracted from the Nile, leading to longstanding tensions with the other Nile basin countries. (Louise Sarant/Egypt independent)

 

More : http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/climate-change-and-water-mismanagement-parch-egypt

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An inconvenient truth: More polar bears alive today than 40 years ago

An inconvenient truth: More polar bears alive today than 40 years ago | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

 

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Author Zac Unger was originally drawn to the arctic circle to write a “mournful elegy” about how global warming was decimating the polar bear populations. He was surprised to find that the polar bears were not in such dire straits after all.

“There are far more polar bears alive today than there were 40 years ago,” Unger told NPR in an interview about his new book, “Never Look a Polar Bear in The Eye.” “There are about 25,000 polar bears alive today worldwide. In 1973, there was a global hunting ban. So once hunting was dramatically reduced, the population exploded.”

 

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Via Thomas Wentzel, Kathy Bosiak
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LIFE in the Snow: Photos From the Great Blizzard of 1947 - New York | offene Ablage: nothing to hide

LIFE in the Snow: Photos From the Great Blizzard of 1947 - New York | offene Ablage: nothing to hide | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

 

Andreas Feininger—Time & Life Pictures, via

http://life.time.com/history/life-in-the-snow-photos-from-the-great-blizzard-of-1947

 

 

 

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Little Ice Age was caused by volcanism | newsblog - blogs.nature 2012-01-31| offene Ablage: nothing to hide

Little Ice Age was caused by volcanism | newsblog - blogs.nature 2012-01-31| offene Ablage: nothing to hide | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

orignial URL: http://feeds.nature.com/~r/news/rss/the_great_beyond/~3/5EBOBiRQRgg/little-ice-age-was-caused-by-volcanism.html

 

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Some of the iconic winter landscapes by Pieter Bruegel the Elder are more than just fine examples of sixteenth-century Dutch art. Paintings such as Bruegel’s Hunters in the Snow (1565) also serve as vivid evidence for the ‘Little Ice Age’, a period of cold climate conditions and glacier advances in Europe and elsewhere that lasted from the late Middle Ages until the nineteenth century.

 

There has been quite some debate over the years about the precise onset and the physical causes of this extended cold spell, with one school of thought favouring low solar activity during the ‘Maunder Minimum’ and another the cooling effect of big volcanic eruptions.

 

A paper published today in Geophysical Research Letters may put the solar-trigger hypothesis at rest. Gifford Miller of the University of Colorado in Boulder and his colleagues suggest that the Little Ice Age began abruptly between 1275 and 1300 AD following four large sulfur-rich explosive eruptions, most likely in the tropics, over a mere 50-year period.

 

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