oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts
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oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts
An aggregator for (oAnth's) daily interests in humanities, arts, science, geography, economics, politics - academia, education - activism, advocacy - itec, free software, open source, open access, open knowledge - languages in use: mostly EN, FR, DE
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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from Chronique des Droits de l'Homme
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CADTM - Allemagne-Grèce : deux poids, deux mesures - Voici 60 ans, l’annulation de la dette allemande

CADTM - Allemagne-Grèce : deux poids, deux mesures - Voici 60 ans, l’annulation de la dette allemande | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

Voici 60 ans, en février 1953, à Londres était signé un accord historique sur la dette allemande. Les termes de l’accord signé tranchent radicalement avec la manière dont est aujourd’hui traitée la Grèce. Après la seconde guerre mondiale, de multiples conditions ont été réunies pour permettre à l’Allemagne de l’Ouest de se développer rapidement en permettant la reconstruction de son appareil industriel. Non seulement la dette contractée par l’Allemagne en-dehors des deux guerres mondiales a été réduite de plus de 60%, mais le règlement des dettes de guerre et le paiement des réparations aux victimes civiles et aux Etats ont été reportés à une date indéterminée : de fait, à la réunification allemande qui est intervenue en 1990 et au traité de paix qui a été signé à Moscou la même année entre les autorités des deux Allemagnes en cours d’unification, les Etats-Unis, l’URSS, le Royaume-Uni et la France. Le poids des réparations sur l’économie allemande a donc été longtemps différé. Et dans le cas des réparations dues à la Grèce, celles-ci n’ont pas représenté le moindre effort de la part de l’Allemagne puisque les autorités allemandes refusent de donner suite aux demandes grecques...

 

 


Via Alcofribas
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Rescooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide" from Muzibao
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Morton Feldman et John Cage in Conversation

Morton Feldman et John Cage in Conversation | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

 

via http://beyond-the-coda.blogspot.fr/2013/02/conversation.html


Via Florence Trocmé
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Climate change and water mismanagement parch Egypt

Climate change and water mismanagement parch Egypt | oAnth's day by day interests - via its scoop.it contacts | Scoop.it

Climate change, a fast growing population, ill-designed infrastructure, high levels of pollution and lack of law enforcement have made Egypt a country thirsty for water — both in terms of quantity and quality.

The River Nile, which is considered poor by many experts and hydrologists, lies at lower altitude than the rest of the country. Massive electric pumps extract the water from the river’s bed and canals and direct it to industry, agriculture and for individual water use.

A significant portion of the water contained in Lake Nasser’s 5,000 square kilometer basin is lost to evaporation, while old networks of leaking pipes also deprive the country of satisfactory access to its most important resource: water.

In order to debate water scarcity in Egypt, its causes, and how climate change makes the issue more pressing than ever, as well as looking to solutions, a panel of experts were invited to participate in the 13th Cairo Climate Talk last week entitled “Growing Thirst: Sustainable Water Solutions for Egypt.”

Tarek Kotb, the First Assistant Minister in the Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation, and a member of the panel discussion, talked about the dwindling water share per capita with a sense of urgency. “Every year, the Egyptian population grows by 1.8 million, while the annual quota of Nile water allocated to Egypt, 55 billion cubic meters, has remained unchanged since the 1959 Nile Water Agreement,” he says.

While Egyptians in the 1960s could enjoy a water share per capita of 2800 cubic meters for all purposes, the current share has dropped to 660 cubic meters today—below the international standard defining water poverty of 1000 cubic meters.

Kotb estimates that Egypt is gradually going to leave the stage of water scarcity and enter a phase of drastic water stress in the next 40 years, if no sustainable water management is put in place.

“By 2050, there will be about 160 million Egyptians and only 370 cubic meters of water per capita,” he says. While Egypt has other options for its water needs, such as tapping into groundwater basins and desalinating sea-water, the bulk of water is still extracted from the Nile, leading to longstanding tensions with the other Nile basin countries. (Louise Sarant/Egypt independent)

 

More : http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/climate-change-and-water-mismanagement-parch-egypt

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