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Must Read articles: Apps and eBooks for kids
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Apps & Oranges: The App Store vs. Google Play (infographic)

Apps & Oranges: The App Store vs. Google Play (infographic) | Must Read articles: Apps and eBooks for kids | Scoop.it

Apple owns only 18 percent of the app universe, but it banks almost 500 percent more than Google, pulling in a sweet $5.1 million in revenue each and every day. Meanwhile, Google owns 75 percent of all app downloads, but it only takes in $1.1 million per day.

(...) 

Not shockingly, Google Play has better search, showing apps even when people misspell the name or category.


Read more at http://venturebeat.com/2013/07/17/comparing-apples-and-googles-the-app-store-vs-google-play-infographic/#2MjMPel0xM1Rtf0p.99 ;

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In a digital age, parents value printed books for their kids

In a digital age, parents value printed books for their kids | Must Read articles: Apps and eBooks for kids | Scoop.it
Parents who have young children at home are a relatively tech-savvy group. They are more likely than other adults to have computers, internet access, smartphones, and tablet computers.

Via Carisa Kluver, Nathalie van Ee
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Carisa Kluver's curator insight, May 29, 2013 12:01 PM

Great info about how print and eBooks are evolving side-by-side ...

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It’s a book… or is it? | Feature | Computer Arts magazine

It’s a book… or is it? | Feature | Computer Arts magazine | Must Read articles: Apps and eBooks for kids | Scoop.it
Books are changing, and the publishing world itself is taking on a new form where designers, animators and technologists will be essential, says Sophie Rochester
In 2013 we’re likely to see much more experimental participation from the writers themselves, and we expect to see many more teaming up directly with technologists to create new kinds of work. (...) Authors will want to collaborate directly with designers, animators and technologists, and vice versa. And we’ll see many projects initiated by designers, animators and technologists bringing their creative instincts and experience to the storytelling arena. These innovative approaches to content are what we’ll be looking to cover with the most interest through 2013.
@CotCotCotApps's insight:
love this article! experimental projects, innovative approach to content and storytelling, collaboration is the only way forward for apps and ebooks!!!
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Apple's iOS 7 App Store will let you search for apps by age-range | Apps Playground

Apple's iOS 7 App Store will let you search for apps by age-range | Apps Playground | Must Read articles: Apps and eBooks for kids | Scoop.it
If you're a parent with an iPhone or iPad, you'll know how hard it can be to find great children's apps on the cluttered App Store.
@CotCotCotApps's insight:

HOORAY!! 

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Bibliotech: 6 concerns about trends in digital collection development

Bibliotech: 6 concerns about trends in digital collection development | Must Read articles: Apps and eBooks for kids | Scoop.it

I have concerns about the way eCollections are developing – particularly the following emerging trends in K-12 library programs. 

 

The following statements are based on conversations I've had in edWeb.net/emergingtech, and on the conference circuit with fellow school librarians in other districts. 

(1) Administrators/Board of Education members confuse owning eContent with technology integration.

(2) Administrators/Board of Education members “gift” libraries with iPads/Kindles/Nooks, but fail to provide additional funding for eContent/apps, or tech support to manage them.

(3) Libraries replace print with eContent, without making curricular adjustments to their instructional program to teach students and teachers how to access eContent.

(4) Librarians feel compelled to acquire eContent from only one distributor because it is too confusing – for them, for students, for teachers, for business managers - to purchase eContent from a variety of distributors, thus materials selection is driven by who they buy from, not what aligns with the curriculum.

(5) Distributors are “packaging” eContent, and marketing these packages as Common Core aligned, or standards aligned. (...) It is our job to develop our collections, aligning them with our school/district’s curriculum – not to buy ready-made packages from vendors. 

(6) eContent requires meticulous, patron-aware (rather than traditional) cataloging.  It is virtually (no pun intended) impossible to “display” eContent. There is no way to physically put it in the hands of students, if students are using their own technology.

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Don't Burn Your Books---Print Is Here to Stay

Don't Burn Your Books---Print Is Here to Stay | Must Read articles: Apps and eBooks for kids | Scoop.it
The e-book had its moment, but sales are slowing. Readers still want to turn those crisp, bound pages, writes Nicholas Carr.

 

" The growth in e-book sales is slowing markedly. And purchases of e-readers are actually shrinking, as consumers opt instead for multipurpose tablets. It may be that e-books, rather than replacing printed books, will ultimately serve a role more like that of audio books—a complement to traditional reading, not a substitute."

@CotCotCotApps's insight:

Nicholas Carr, a 2010 Pulitzer finalist with “The Shallows,” (exploring the distracting nature of digital culture), writes here an interesting piece about ebooks and the unexpected resilience of traditional books! 

 

... which is not contradictory to our core belief that ebooks and apps are no direct competitors to pbooks but rather co-exist with other reading format, complement or extend the reading experience. 

 

eBooks and apps are no revolution per se but an evolution: "E-books, in other words, may turn out to be just another format—an even lighter-weight, more disposable paperback. That would fit with the discovery that once people start buying digital books, they don't necessarily stop buying printed ones."

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