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MXR Custom Badass Modified O.D. Pedal

MXR Custom Badass Modified O.D. Pedal | musical instrument | Scoop.it

Like many aspects of guitar-gear engineering, the pursuit of perfect overdrive stirs religious fervor and consumes intellectual assets typically allotted to papal edicts and nanophysics. But whether you consider the to and fro over overdrive nuance a righteous quest or a hopeless maze of obsession, there has never been a time when there were more paths to tone enlightenment.

With the introduction of the Custom Badass Modified O.D., MXR seems determined to stuff every conceivable shade of overdrive in a single pedal. And they damn near succeed. It’s a pedal that can walk the line between subtle boost and refined aggression, depending on your approach and amplifier of choice. But it won’t excessively color your guitar’s voice, and it lets you tailor the pedal to your rig in very specific and minute ways.

Golden Glow
For those of us who’ve had Dyna Comps and Distortion+ pedals that haven’t crapped out after 20 years of regular use, any MXR pedal tends to inspire confidence. And the Modified O.D., which looks especially deluxe in its brushed-metal enclosure, feels as sturdy as its forebears—even if the four small knobs and miniature bump button look a little less robust than the big rubber knobs that once graced MXR stomps.

Three of the knobs on the true-bypass Custom Badass Modified O.D.—tone, output, and gain—are practically de rigueur for any overdrive and need little explanation. However, the fourth, a 100 Hz boost/cut control, is a big part of what makes the Badass different. Another critical differentiator is the bump switch, which boosts low and mid frequencies together and can significantly transform this pedal’s voice.

Versed in Many Languages
Players look to overdrive for different reasons. Some like it to work nearly like a clean boost—adding barely perceptible dirt to a boosted signal. Metal players often use overdrives to kick an already raging amp into high gear without sacrificing harmonic richness and clarity the way you might with a distortion or fuzz pedal.

But while the Custom Badass Modified O.D. seems ever so slightly geared toward the latter camp and heavy rockin’ players in general, it’s quite comfortable lingering in cleaner, more cultivated settings. Setting the level to about one o’clock and the other controls at noon gives the combination of Fender single-coils and 6L6s or 6V6s a little more brawn and attitude—perfect for giving lean tones a little Heartbreakers/Big Star-style sass and swagger. It’s a great sound for electric 12-strings, too. And it can give harmonics a little more sustain, bloom, and presence.

The 100 Hz knob has remarkable shaping power through the whole range of gain levels. And it’s especially effective in roots-rock settings. Here, cranking it clockwise lends both buoyancy and weight to chord arpeggios that can transform a tune into something much meatier and lend bottom-end heft to a mix. A counterclockwise twist gives leads a cutting and nasty, laser-guided quality, and can take the muck out of the mix if you have a ham-fisted bass player on the opposite side of the stage. Get aggressive with the tone knob, too, and you’ll verge on Beck-/Page-like Telecaster sounds.

The 100 Hz boost is equally valuable in high-gain environs, and when used with generous gain settings, the pedal can get positively nasty. A Les Paul and Marshall Super Lead will go from big to fiery and ferocious. And cranking the tone along with the 100 Hz and level knobs turns neck humbuckers into flamethrowers—super hot but capable of great pick sensitivity.

If you’re interested in shaking buildings to their foundation, hitting the bump switch and switching to the neck humbucker will summon a throaty, cavernous roar from a 4x12. The bump switch is a less obvious match with clean settings, though when used in conjunction with doses of the pedal’s gain, tone, and 100 Hz knobs, it gives a Telecaster’s neck pickup through a Fender Twin a deep, smoky, and honking baritone-sax quality that adds a superheavyweight kind of authority to singing blues leads.

The Verdict
MXR pulls off an admirable balancing act with the Custom Badass Modified O.D. It’s a thoughtfully designed pedal—rangy, full of character, and capable of what at times seems like a thousand different voices. Lowgain settings make this pedal perfect for jangly roots rock that needs a kick, Stonsey chug, or lending a little dirt and boost to a clean 6L6 amp. Crank the gain, tone, and 100 Hz knobs and put it front of a hotter amp, and you have a pretty sizzling metal lead voice.

The Modified O.D. is not entirely transparent, but at low-gain settings it adds a few pounds of muscle without sacrificing your guitar’s voice. And though it isn’t the only overdrive out there with more expansive tone-shaping capabilities than your run-of-the-mill TS clone, you won’t find yourself chasing your tail in an EQ tweaking labyrinth. It’s pretty easy to find a tone, easy to get back to where you were when you move on, and a very tidy bit of engineering on that count. And at just around a hundred bucks, it’s a contender for the performance-to-value crown in the overdrive division. This is one pedal that’s badass in more than just name.

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MXR: ZW-38 Black Label Chorus | Reviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.com

MXR: ZW-38 Black Label Chorus  | Reviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.com | musical instrument | Scoop.it
Very easy to use, standard chorus controls plus a level control for the overall volume of the effect and two knobs for treble and bass. It achieves the most common chorus sounds, from ballads, "Come As You Are", etc.
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'78 Custom Badass Review | MXR | guitar effects | Reviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com

'78 Custom Badass Review | MXR | guitar effects | Reviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com | musical instrument | Scoop.it
'78 Custom Badass review / MXR / guitar effects / Unbiased reviews of guitar equipment, CD and DVD music at Ultimate-Guitar.Com...
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Wampler Pedals | Hand Made Boutique Guitar Effect Pedals | Reverb and Delay | Faux Spring Reverb

Wampler Pedals | Hand Made Boutique Guitar Effect Pedals | Reverb and Delay | Faux Spring Reverb | musical instrument | Scoop.it
Boutique Guitar Effect Pedals. Sinlge Unit high Quality Guitar Effects. Brent Mason Hot Wired. Brad Paisley Overdrive. True Bypass Guitar Effects.
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Wampler Pedals SLOstortion Pedal Review - Premier Guitar

Wampler Pedals SLOstortion Pedal Review - Premier Guitar | musical instrument | Scoop.it
Known for previous successes in the amp-in-a-box pedal market, Brian Wampler is back with his take on the venerable SLO-100.
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ME-70

ME-70 | musical instrument | Scoop.it

Ease of Use: The Boss ME-70 is exactly what it claims to be: Intuitive. It takes a bit to find how to get the kind of sound you want, but with a very small amount of practice, it comes naturally. It's especially nice for any of you Who are like me, and hate the menu-shifting multi-effects unit's that have become increasingly popular. Also, it's got tap-tempo for just about every effect.

To be honest, I don't work much with the patches, I just use it in Manual Mode (basically it works just like a board of stompboxes in this mode) but from what I've heard, the patch system is not great because once you have a patch set, you can't edit it on the fly. The manual is just fine and explains everything pretty well (in many languages!). And one final note: The built in patches are actually of some use, unlike most multi-effects of this price. // 8

Sound: I bought this unit expecting a simple, effective interface, and good sound quality, and I got both. I'm playing the ME-70 with a MIM Fender Telecaster, and a Washburn Idol 64 Deluxe, run through a Randall RG 75 hybrid combo. I've yet to play it through a PA, but I can say that through an amp, I'd recommend forgoing the amp modeling, and just using the excellent 4-band EQ setting. Through headphones, the amp modeling sounds really nice, and I wouldn't hesitate to play direct through a PA or record with this.

Through headphones, my Tele is a bit noisy on the higher-gain distortions, but I'll Live. The effects are very nice, just what I'd expect from Boss. If you're looking for crazy off-the-wall type effects for your music, you'll have a tough time here, but I play in an Indie-Electro band and an Ambiance-Visual band, and the effects work fine for those. At home, when I'm just jamming out the blues, or to my favorite songs, the overdrives and distortions are really great, with a bit of EQ-twiddling.

I don't really strive to get any sounds for my favorite artists (Led Zeppelin, BB King, Nine Inch Nails, Modwheelmood, Radiohead, etc) but from what I can tell, you can get just about any general tone you want with this thing. The only effects or sounds that struck me as a bit weak were the octave (I used to own an EHX Multiplexer, so maybe I'm spoiled) and the wah (but any Crybaby owner will say that). The chorus isn't necessarily weak, but it's nothing special. It can get nice n thick though, if you're into that. // 8

Reliability & Durability: I'd definitely depend on this, and though I haven't yet, I'd easily gig with this thing without a backup. Its made of sturdy metal and the only thing I'd fear is for the plastic stomp switches. Otherwise, the knobs, expression pedal, and everything else seem fine. // 8

Impression: Like I said, I play in an Ambiance-Visual band (Radioheadish, but different) and an Indie-Electro band. But at home, I play just about everything, from black metal, to Acoustic, to blues, to classic rock, etc. This pedal has been working just fine so far, you just have to work with the settings a bit (certainly less than the monstrous Line 6 and DigiTech boards I've played).

It's probably important to know that I used to be a die-hard stompbox player. I was all about individual analog effects. I still certainly see the advantage, but financial issues, as well as convenience led me to this board. For other stompbox users, I'd highly recommend it over any other multi-effects board. If it were stolen or lost, I'd definitely get a new one. Even if you're intent on playing with individual stompboxes, this would make a great backup, or practice untit. I used to hate multi-effects, but Boss really got the job done here. // 9

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OC-3 Super Octave

OC-3 Super Octave | musical instrument | Scoop.it

Ease of Use: It's not hard to use, but it IS easy to misuse! Tweaking any knob too far can result in absolutely horrible noises, and on certain settings a lot will depend on your dynamics. The instructions offer setting recommendations, very helpful in giving the musician a place to start. They suggest using the neck pickup alone when using the OC-3, and rolling back the guitar's tone knob if you get noise or incorrect signal processing. I have found that using the neck pickup is indeed usually a good idea, but following these recommendations will not substitute for attention to your dynamics (what your hands are doing on the strings in terms of sound control). This is not a pedal that does what you want all by itself once you set it: you have to constantly interact with it, as with your guitar. // 8

Sound: I use a Godin LG with Seymour Duncan P90 pickups, a Fryette Valvulator to keep my signal clear, several other effects, and a Fender Mustang I amp set like a '65 Twin Reverb. The OC-3 benefits a lot from the use of a Compressor ahead of it in the chain, and I use a Pigtronix Philosopher's Tone, my current favorite pedal, for this purpose.

Setting the "level" knob at 3:00 provides unity volume. I NEVER use the "drive" mode, which provides a very hard to handle, ugly and unpleasant variety of distortion and a lot of unintentional noise. When playing jam/jazz/rock type stuff, I usually have it set on "poly" mode, which is not as finicky a setting as "oct 2" in terms of accepting polyphonic signal. You still have to be a little careful: you CAN play chords, but I typically don't when using this pedal. Also, this setting only gives an octave sound part-way up the fretboard and down the strings, depending on where you have the "range" knob set.

"Oct 2", of course, provides a much more evident octave sound and the option of a second octave down as well as the first. You can't play any chords or double ANY notes on this setting or you get noise, so take care to muffle all strings but the one you're playing. I only find this setting useful when doing improv free-form jazz fusion type stuff myself, but I'm glad it's there to use when I want a little extra weirdness.

I usual have the "oct1" and "range/oct 2" knobs both at 2:00 for the rock I usually play, but this pedal comes in useful in a different format that I'd like to mention. I also play solo fingerstyle country blues, and for this I use the OC-3 on "poly" mode with "oct 1" and "range" set at about 10:30, giving me just a slight low octave on the lower notes only. It sounds like I have a partner playing washtub bass! Preceding the OC-3 in this case is the compressor, on a subtle setting. // 9

Reliability & Durability: My OC-3 seems very sturdy, as all Boss pedals are. // 10

Impression: This isn't one of my absolute favorite pedals, but I do like very much to use it for certain things. It's most useful in funky music, where my Crybaby Wah makes a good pairing. I have enough other distortion and Overdrive options that I don't have to touch the OC-3's horrible-sounding "drive" mode, the only feature on the pedal I find useless. I love the washtub bass sound I can get out of it, which I mentioned above. And I like that it makes me pay attention to how I'm playing, which helps me be a better musician.

Still, I will never replace it with another of its kind. It was the cheapest octave pedal I felt comfortable buying, and I got it used. Many higher-end pedals combine higher quality octave generation with lots of other functions, and at some point I intend to upgrade to the Electro-Harmonix POG2 Polyphonic Octave Generator or the Electro-Harmonix HOG Octave Generator/Synthesizer. But for an entry-level octave generator, the Boss pedal is great. It will definitely always have a home on my country blues effects board. // 8

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RV-5 Digital Reverb

RV-5 Digital Reverb | musical instrument | Scoop.it

Ease of Use: This reverb padel is very easy to use although it's many options. The effect has 6 diffrent reverb delay and modulation types which can by easily desigened into any need. // 8

Sound: The main adventage of this effect is it's sound. This effect has a great sound which fits great in all playing styles, from jazz to heavy metal. The effect provides all types of reverb, from the smallest and the most not heard to the most powerful delay. // 10

Reliability & Durability: This effect is no doubtly very dependable for few reasons:

01. It's a Boss, a well known dependable company which builds first class products for years.
02. This effect is simply very dependable. I had this effect for two years now, and it never made one problem!

It's important to add that sach as a lot other effect padels this pedal also uses lots of batteries. // 10

Impression: My overall impression of the effect is very very positive. This effect no doubtly supplys the goods. The effect is very useful and fits all styles of music. I would truly recommend this effect to who ever search for a reverb pedal, it's just the best combination of echo, reverb, delay and modulation there is. // 10

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GE-7 Equalizer

GE-7 Equalizer | musical instrument | Scoop.it

Ease of Use: The only flaw. Although it comes with an instruction manual, it really isn't any help. What you have to do is sit down for a while, work with it hooked up to your amp, and figure out how it works. After that initial process, though, it's very easy to use. // 6

Sound: I use this with an Ibanez Gio and a modified Cort Knock-off Stratocaster into a Crate GT212. It gives a very nice boost right where you tell it to. The controls work like a charm. My only greivance is that it gives off a slight hum when using the full boost. // 9

Reliability & Durability: It's a Boss. Nothing else to say. // 10

Impression: I play mostly grunge, punk, hardcore, and noise. It is great for a nice boost when needed. I often use it almost as a volume pedal. I dial in my lead tone on the equalizer and put the boost all the way up. I then put my rhythem sound into the amp. When playing an intro or solo, I turn on the equalizer with my lead tone. When singing, I turn off the equalizer for my softer rhythm sound. I also use it often to give a bass type pop sound to an intro. Overall very nice. This is the best equalizer I've seen, and I would buy it again. // 8

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Download Free MP3 Cutter and Editor - Free Download

Download Free MP3 Cutter and Editor - Free Download | musical instrument | Scoop.it
Official download page for Free MP3 Cutter and Editor. This is a simple and easy to use software for editing mp3 files.

Via Patty Ball
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DD-7 Digital Delay

DD-7 Digital Delay | musical instrument | Scoop.it

Ease of Use: This pedal seems to be an upgrade of the Boss DD-6, which has been extensively reviewed on this site. It shares a lot of similarities (number and function of the knobs) with this previous model, and adds longer delays and a couple of new features.

For instance, you can now go up to 6.4sec delay (mode 3200ms long), and record up to 40sec in Hold mode to do overdubs or solo rhythms. The Reverse and Warp modes are remnants of the aforementioned DD-6 pedal. New modes include Modulate, which is similar to a chorus effect, and Analog which emulates discontinued DM-2 (analog delay) pedal. One last thing the DD-6 didn't have and that is included here: the tap tempo can be set using an external foot Switch.

The first 3 knobs (Level, F'Back, and D'Time) are standard on pretty much any delay pedal, so it was very intuitive at first to use it straight out of the box. Reading the manual was really helpful to figure out what the 'Mode' knob does, especially regarding the new or unusual features. It even comes with a few recommended settings to get particular sounds. Overall, after reading the manual, you can get a good idea of what this pedal is capable of after a couple hours of playing around.

I haven't tweaked the electronics in any way, I guess the store technicians either, so it has all the stock specs. // 9

Sound: I play a Gibson LP Classic and a Schecter Damien through a Boss OS-2 (Overdrive/Distortion) and Line 6 Spider II 30W amp. I don't get any noise when using this pedal. The intensity of the effects can be readily tuned with the first 3 knobs, so the quality of the sound is easily adjusted.

My favorite feature is the Hold mode, which provides the ability of recording pretty long riffs, and playing them in loop. I tried recording a clean riff, then kicked in some distortion and soloed over it. It sounds pretty nice. The Reverse mode is really cool too; it creates crazy moods like from late 60's / early 70's psychedelic rock.

I just wish there were a tap tempo mode that would not require a separate foot Switch (e.g. Boss FS-5U) and/or expression pedal (e.g. Boss EV-5). // 9

Reliability & Durability: It's the usual Boss pedal design: reliable electronic enclosed in a sturdy metal casing. You can drop it, kick it,... (within reasonable limits, of course), and it's not going to suffer.

The only concern is the battery life. Make sure you unplug the input cable, or you'll run out of power within a couple of hours. Otherwise, if you play Live a lot, use the power adapter. // 9

Impression: I have been playing for about 5 years, anything from classic rock (Aerosmith, Black Sabbath) to modern-day metal (Mastodon, Lamb Of God). The pedal comes with so many modes, that after playing with the knobs a few seconds, you can get any delay. Again, my favorite feature is a the Hold mode

Before buying it, I asked a guitar tech to show me the new features, then I played a bit with it. I didn't really compare it to delay pedals from other manufacturers. I simply went for the Boss brand name, because it is so popular and gets great reviews. If it were stolen or lost, I would definitely by another one. The many built-in features and overall quality justify the price. I guess the only thing it needs is the tap tempo mode, but a simple foot Switch can take care of that. // 9

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OD-3 OverDrive

OD-3 OverDrive | musical instrument | Scoop.it

Ease of Use: I Purchased my Boss OD-3 OverDrive pedal last month and it was a great purchase. It’s a very simple pedal, with your basic controls (level, Drive, and Treble). The controls unfortunately the knobs aren’t push in, their permanently sticking out of the pedal, and when playing, it sometimes interferes with your playing. The Manual for it was extremely pointless. All that was included in it was a serial number, and basic instructions. // 8

Sound: With the pedal I use a Fender Frontman 15G amp, with a squire stratocaster. The sound is excellent, and there is not a lot of the feedback. The pedal does not sound good all the time, the middle and treble knobs on the amp itself have to be set to a specific level, or the quality of sound drops sufficiently, as well it makes the amp a lot louder than it is supposed to go, which may cause future problems. The pedal gets the same sound as bands such as The Strokes, The Hives, and Wolfmother. The overall sound of the pedal is good, but could be better. // 9

Reliability & Durability: The pedal itself is very reliable. The electronics are very secure inside it due to harnesses holding them from getting tangled or wrecked. There is also a rubber strip on the pedal to prevent the player’s foot from slipping, it’s a good feature when it works, but it doesn’t exactly work that well. I would definitely use it on a gig without a backup. // 10

Impression: I play Indie rock, and pop rock, and the pedal definitely suits that music style. I have been playing guitar for almost a year now, and the pedal is on of the best buys that I have made. I hope to buy some more of the Boss pedals, because I was very impressed with this pedal. The only thing I don’t like about this product is that the knobs aren’t push in and that when playing your foot sometimes messes up the settings, everything else I love. If it was stolen or I had lost it, I would definately go out and buy another one. // 9

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Dunlop: MXR Custom Shop GT-OD Overdrive | Reviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.com

Dunlop: MXR Custom Shop GT-OD Overdrive | Reviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.com | musical instrument | Scoop.it
Built from the ground up with the best available components, the MXR Custom Shop GT-OD Overdrive pedal creates smooth, warm, and classic overdrive without excess noise or tone coloring.
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MXR M-134 Stereo Chorus Review | Dunlop | Guitar Effects | Reviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com

MXR M-134 Stereo Chorus Review | Dunlop | Guitar Effects | Reviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com | musical instrument | Scoop.it
MXR M-134 Stereo Chorus review / Dunlop / Guitar Effects / Unbiased reviews of guitar equipment, CD and DVD music at Ultimate-Guitar.Com...
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MXR: M-116 Fullbore Metal | Reviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.com

MXR: M-116 Fullbore Metal | Reviews @ Ultimate-Guitar.com | musical instrument | Scoop.it
The MXR M-116 Fullbore Metal has many features but only one goal, to create to most punishing distortion know to man and pack it into a small bulletproof case.
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Wampler Pedals Super Plextortion and Pinnacle Pedal Review - Premier Guitar

Wampler Pedals Super Plextortion and Pinnacle Pedal Review - Premier Guitar | musical instrument | Scoop.it
The Super Plextortion and Pinnacle from Brian Wampler aim for two iconic rock sounds: Plexi Marshall and Van Halen's "Brown Sound."...
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ME-25

ME-25 | musical instrument | Scoop.it

Ease of Use: This Product is very good with sounds. There is a large array of Default sounds from clean, clean metal, distortions, crunch, flangers etc. I found a sound almost immediately and just tweaked a few things hear and there and got the sound I wanted. Editing patches is simple. I did not use the Manual at all for this product. Editing the patch is as simple as press 2 buttons at the same time and turning the knobs you want to change. I did take a quick look at the manual for one thing I wanted to look for and it was not in there, I had to search it on Youtube to find the answer. My unit has been upgraded. It comes with a program for you computer where you can input new sounds or output sounds you don't want. In that program you can also organize the sounds in the order you want them. This program is really cool and helpful an I highly recommend this product. // 9

Sound: For this product I use both my Ibanez guitars (ART100, SA260FM) they sounds great with all the patches. The Effects are great all of them can be used and all of them are bright and full. Although, I did notice that some of the clean patches had distortion on it which, if you ask me defeats the purpose of CLEAN. But, small adjustments and they were good to go. The first patch I tweaked I believe was #12. I just added a little distortion and Drive and it sounds almost identical to Trivium, the sound on the "In Waves" Album. I have arrange all of the patches so I can't say which number they were but I only use 2 distortions and 1 clean, but I have another clean with a little more delay just incase. // 7

Reliability & Durability: This Product I can depend on 100% I have been using it everyday since day 1 and its still running strong. The effect pedal is strong and durable. All the buttons and knobs are securely in place and without a doubt I step on them hard and fast and they are still at 100%. I have not used it live yet, but I would use it and I would not bring a back-up but, saying the least, I would strongly suggest that you get the AC adaptor rather than using batteries. On that note, I used this product with batteries and it lasted almost a week playing it for 6+ hours a day. // 9

Impression: I mainly play metal and there are a lot of metal patch some with high gain and some with low gain and more crunch. This product is very versatile and can be used for any genre of music. I have been playing this for about 2 months and I love it, I have not looked back to my Pandora PX4D box since. If this was stolen I would probably get the ME-70 just because it pretty much the same thing and then some. I only got the ME-25 cause I needed a new foot switch multi-effect pedal and the price was right. My favorite feature is the effects pedal, you can use it for Volume (which is what I use mainly) or you can use +1 Octave or -1 octave and a Wah pedal. I did compare it to other product, I wish I went for the Line 6 POD HD-500 but I couldn't afford it then and some time soon I will go out and get the HD-500 but will still use the ME-25. // 8

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FV-50H

FV-50H | musical instrument | Scoop.it

Ease of Use: This pedal is one of those "easy-to-use" pedals. It's as simple as it gets when coming to a volume pedal. There are 2 inputs, 2 outputs, and a tuner out jack as well. There is a "Minimum Volume" knob with a 0-10 range. The minimum volume, as self-explanitory as it is, determines the minimum volume when the rocker is in the heel position. Probably the most convenient feature is this foot volume does not require power, meaning a battery and or adapter isn't needed. // 9

Sound: At the time of purchase, an in-store PRS w/ P90's was run into the FV-50H and then into a Fender Twin amp. Currently this pedal is used with my Squier Affinity Strat into a Peavey Vypyr 30 amp. Even though the "Minimum Volume" knob has a range of 0-10, don't get too excited: The range of volume with the knob on 0 is about 0,1,2,3,7. Thus, the range could be disappointing. An example would be if someone wanted to set the minimum volume to 6 or 7, and then during a solo rock the pedal completely forward for a volume boost, the change in volume would be barely noticeable if even existent. // 6

Reliability & Durability: The Boss FV-50H, being a boss/roland pedal, isn't as durable as you might think. The entire pedal is mostly a hard plastic, not the greatest when it comes to durability. As far as battery life, there is none, no power required so no worries about the pedal dieing off during a gig. However, like stated earlier in this section, the casing isn't to sturdy and it just doesn't seem like it can hold up as long as most other pedals. In conclusion, I do not feel this pedal could hold up for gig after gig without a backup. // 6

Impression: A volume pedal could be used in any musical genre or situation. However, I don't think this exact pedal would be the one to go with. Compared to a Dunlop Volume pedal, I found this pedal better. Compared to a Morley Little Alligator, it was too hard to call in my opinion. If you're looking for a volume pedal I would suggest looking into an Ernie Ball volume pedal or one of the higher end Boss volumes such as the FV-500H. If you do decide to go with a Boss volume, make sure you know which one to get. If you have passive pickups go with a Boss volume marked with H after it's name such as the Boss FV-50H, h= high impedance. If you have active pickups go with a Boss volume marked with L, such as the Boss FV-50L, l= low impedance. // 8

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RC-2 Loop Station

RC-2 Loop Station | musical instrument | Scoop.it

Ease of Use: This pedal essentially has one purpose: to loop your riffs and dub over them for up to 16 minutes of recording. I found that after one day of tinkering with this pedal I was able to do just that, as well as save them and bring them back whenever I want. Beyond looping and dubbing, understanding this pedal has still not come to me after a month or two. The manual does a so-so good job of explaining it's other features, such as the percussion sounds you can add, or the "loop quantizing" feature, but the manual is so small-texted and bulky-paged that I find it hard to commit these features to memory. The fact that there is only one button and the pedal to perform all these other options is also overwhelming. // 7

Sound: The sound that the loop station projects is perfect, considering it only plays back what you play. It does not lose quality no matter how many times you dub over it. The volume for the loop can be changed via a knob, as can the percussion sound volume. It is quick and easy to build a nice loop, and even save it if you'd like. // 10

Reliability & Durability: This works well for someone such as myself Who likes to improvise over progressions at home, and I imagine it would work well during a gig as well. The body of the pedal seems solid enough to withstand a beating, but I'd be more worried about the mechanics if I were to use it in a gig. A person would need a great understanding of the pedal to use it Live, or they may find that they just erased the loop they were playing, or dubbed over it with some background noise. // 8

Impression: When I bought this pedal I was looking for something that I could loop a chord progression with and then solo over, and it works great for that! Sixteen minutes of recording is more than enough for people such as myself, and I recommend this pedal to anyone with the same pursuits. For someone looking to find a loop station to gig with several times a month, it may be good to invest in a more established station, or at least read the manual more than I have! // 9

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A Timeline of Spotify's Attempted Journey Toward Becoming the 'OS of Music'

A Timeline of Spotify's Attempted Journey Toward Becoming the 'OS of Music' | musical instrument | Scoop.it

A brief timeline of Spotify's journey from European streaming service to attempting to become the "OS of Music."...


Via Yvan Boudillet
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DS-1 Distortion

DS-1 Distortion | musical instrument | Scoop.it

Ease of Use: This pedal is simple to use. This is my first pedal and I got it brand-spankin' new. It comes with a manual and some sample settings to help unexperienced users. // 10

Sound: I use this with my Peavey Raptor and Backstage amp since I don't have alot of money. This pedal is never noisy, even when it's maxed out. The effects of this pedal are endless. You can get almost any sound you want from this baby. Yepperz' you can sure get the sound of some good artists, such as Kurt Cobain or James Hetfield, this baby swings with the best of em'. All effects on this baby are awesome. // 10

Reliability & Durability: Damn right you can depend on it, it's rock solid and is made entirely out of metal. Damn right I would use this on a gig without a backup. I'm playing to shows soon and I just got this so I can't wait to try it out. // 10

Impression: I mainly play rock or metal and this pedal suits my every need. I may use a Peavey Raptor but it sounds amazing even with beginners equipment. I have been playing for a few years on my friends old Marlin SG. If this pedal were stolen I would castrate the bastard who stole it. The thing I love about this pedal is the amount of sounds you can get with it. There is nothing I wish this thing had, it's a perfect distortion pedal. People complain about no Overdrive but thats just it, it's not an Overdrive pedal. Buy this thing. // 10

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