Music Streaming
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Streaming music might be the future, but it's a way off yet

Streaming music might be the future, but it's a way off yet | Music Streaming | Scoop.it
The cloud; not just for work, but also for play. Music from the cloud has been steadily growing in popularity in recent years, to the point now where even Apple is getting in on it with iTunes Radio.
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This article focuses on both the large scale and personal pros and cons of the online streaming industry.  The large scale con referenced is the obvious stalemate between labels and artists vis a vis royalties with these outlets, potentially halting the growth of the industry. Small scale drawbacks include the practicality of mobile streaming. Accessing your library over a network on smartphones and tablets is not universally easy and depends on outside factors, unlike an iPod.  However, the benefits of streaming seem to outweigh the negatives, referencing the overall convenience, organization, and consolidation of one's library.  Additionally, the variety of streaming services is looked upon as a positive here, as differnent styles such as streaming libraries and online radio cater to the different personality types of the listener.  It is evident that the primary aspect that has furthered the music streaming industry is it's user-friendliness, and consumers are difinitely taking note.

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Zeadrea Jones's curator insight, September 12, 2015 9:33 AM

This article is about the difficulty to get the rights to music to have it streamed. It talks about how music streaming can be the future and how everyone loves it. But there is a downside when it comes to the record labels and the artists. This article shows the point of view from the labels and artists stand point. As a fan we don't care we just want to listen to music but the business side is totally different. The labels want to make sure that they and there artists get paid and with streaming its a very sticky situation. 

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Spotify’s Daniel Ek on the Future of Music Streaming, Competing With Apple and Google

Spotify’s Daniel Ek on the Future of Music Streaming, Competing With Apple and Google | Music Streaming | Scoop.it
“If you’re a business now and you’re only on the PC, you’re going to have some serious problems.” That’s how Spotify founder and CEO Daniel Ek desc
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Daniel Ek highlights other non-obvious benefits of Spotify in this interview.  He stresses the healthy business competition with Apple and Google, which provide more options for the consumer in an increasinly digital climate.  He also references the social media component to Spotify and how it connects users with each other, as well as the artists they listen to.  With the way people interact through social media changing, Spotify has successfully and uniquely capitalized on this by making their product more connective and interactive.  This innovation that Spotify and other streaming sites have implemented is one of the premium aspects of the futures of both social media/interaction as well as music consumption, and it cannot, nor should not be overlooked.

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Zeadrea Jones's curator insight, September 12, 2015 9:48 AM

This article is about an interview with the CEO of Spotify Daniel Ek and how the business of music streaming is growing. He also gets into how Spotify is working on new ideas to put music in your cars, TVs, and even refrigerators. He then goes into how Spotify has became the most convenient music streaming service and how they are not playing to stray away from the music aspect but they will stick with what they are good at. My opinion on this article is that I feel that he made some key points with staying with what you are good at and not trying to do multiple services. I really like this company and I feel that it is the best out.  

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Streaming Shakes Up Music Industry’s Model for Royalties

Streaming Shakes Up Music Industry’s Model for Royalties | Music Streaming | Scoop.it
Companies like Spotify and Pandora are catching fire, but the money paid to artists is often tiny, which has the music industry on edge.
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This article details the stark contrast in royalty payments between straight record sales and streams.  The current payment structure offers a comparatively miniscule reward from streaming outlets, a figure which wanes further when extracted from the sum of the label's revenue and the artists' share.  The general population of the music industry is understandably upset with this change in financial direction.  The major labels have compensated for this, to a degree, with their partnership with these streaming sites.  Yet, for the artists to continue to succeed, it is clear that the general financial structure of royalties with this current streaming paradigm must change.

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Zeadrea Jones's curator insight, September 12, 2015 9:58 AM

This article shines light on the dark side of music streaming services. It goes into how artists like Zoe Keating feel that they are getting cheated by the streaming services. It shows that artists royalties from these services can be as low as ten thousandth of a cent. Meaning if you got over 1 million streams on a song over six months you could only get paid around $2,000. This article really opened my eyes as an artist on how theses services can really hurt you financially. With fans using streaming services they don't have to go and buy the album they just have to pay $10 a month for a subscription. 

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Future of music streaming sounds big on popularity, but not profits

Future of music streaming sounds big on popularity, but not profits | Music Streaming | Scoop.it
The next generation of digital music distributors — Rdio, Songza, Pandora, Spotify and so on — are promising to put every song ever in a user's pocket.
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This article examines the financial output of the online streaming industry and compares the results with those of digital sales such as iTunes.  The comparitively poor financial showing of streaming is not just due to the allocation of royalties and the profits of streams vs. actual record purchases.  The article references the disparity in competition and innovation between the two outlets.  When iTunes and the iPod first came out, it was technologically innovative and convenient, but without any reasonable competition.  The mass transitin of users to iTunes as the premium music source allowed the overall industry paradigm to shift and thrive.  Rather, with online streaming, multiple similar outlets in an already digital climate do not allow for the same commitment and impact from consumers.  This, compounded by the obvious difference in prices, lead to an incongruence between profits and usage.  This is an extremely relevent point to keep in mind when examining the future of the industry and does not come from the viewpoints of the artists.

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Zeadrea Jones's curator insight, September 12, 2015 9:39 AM

This article talks about the competition with music streaming. It starts with talking about how Apple released the iPhone and how they promised to put thousands of songs in your pocket. It list the top competitors including Pandora and Spotify. Me personal I love the idea of having streaming services. I use Spotify and Im very pleased with there service were I can have over a thousand of songs right at my finger tips.

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Is Streaming the Future of Music? Creative Jar

Is Streaming the Future of Music? Creative Jar | Music Streaming | Scoop.it
We are Creative Jar, an award winning Digital Design Agency with insight and innovation at our heart, our studio is in Twyford, near London & Reading.
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This article reflects on the positives of music streaming and how it has become the current and future medium of audio consumption.  The article highlights the benefits from the consumer angles, stressing the conveniences, both financially and technologically.  Users can freely listen to more music libraries than ever and is as consolidated as an iPod.  New technologies such as smartphones and tablets are catering their designs to incorporate these services, futhering their potential in future media.  This article highlights the fact that this convenience for users has helped decrease the need for illegally pirating music, a problem which has plagued the industry.  There is no doubt that the convenience tied to online streaming, and the vaster scope of music discovery for the users are the premium factors driving the support of the consumers.  Whether it gains the support of the artists to that same degree remains to be seen.

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David Byrne: 'The internet will suck all creative content out of the world'

David Byrne: 'The internet will suck all creative content out of the world' | Music Streaming | Scoop.it
The boom in digital streaming may generate profits for record labels and free content for consumers, but it spells disaster for today's artists, says David Byrne
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Byrne argues that the new paradigm of free online music streaming will not allow artists to turn enough of a profit.  Under the current setup of record labels' partnerships with streaming outlets, artists only receive 15%-20% of the stream revenue, not enough to turn a significant profit.  Artists such as Byrne, who have already been successful and amassed a fortune through record sales and a complete discography will not be effected as much.  However, with free streaming becoming the norm for listeners, up-and-coming artists with no previous equity will not see enough of a profit and may be turned off from the industry all together.  David Byrne presents an interesting predicament facing the music industry.  Are the current music lovers of today being eliminated from the very industry they have been given unprecedented access to?

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