Music Representation as a Tool
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Music Representation as a Tool
The importance and consequences of visual representations of sound objects or concepts in the composition process. Graphic visualization in musical creation
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SnailAnalyser-Tuner : l'accordeur du futur déjà disponible pour tous !

SnailAnalyser-Tuner : l'accordeur du futur déjà disponible pour tous ! | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it

"Un nouveau procédé d'analyse et de visualisation du son a été conçu par l'équipe Analyse-Synthèse et l'équipe-projet Systèmes et Signaux Sonores (Ircam-CNRS-UPMC).

 

Le SnailAnalyser-Tuner est une technologie brevetée par le CNRS qui offre de nouvelles façons d'accorder un instrument de musique, de travailler l'intonation, de visualiser la musique et les sons en temps réel. Au-delà de l'avancée scientifique marquante qu'il constitue, ce logiciel est une technologie innovante pour les musiciens et tous ceux qui travaillent le son, adaptée aux amateurs comme aux professionnels."


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Ircam's curator insight, January 25, 5:32 AM

Disponible sous Plugivery : http://www.plugivery.com/products/p2242-The-Snail/

Format IOS disponible en juin 2016

 

Teaser : https://vimeo.com/154585489

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Genetic Data Tools Reveal How Pop Music Evolved In The US

Genetic Data Tools Reveal How Pop Music Evolved In The US - The Physics arXiv Blog - Medium
“ And show that The Beatles didn’t start the American music revolution of 1964”
Via Olivier Lartillot
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Olivier Lartillot's curator insight, March 1, 2015 12:35 PM

From the blog post:

 

"Despite the keen interest in the evolution of pop music, there is little to back up most claims in the form of hard analytical evidence.

 

In a new study, number crunching techniques developed to understand genomic data have been used to study the evolution of American pop music. The study found an objective way to categorise musical styles and to measure the way these styles change in popularity over time.

 

The team started with the complete list of US chart topping songs in the form of the US Billboard Hot 100 from 1960 to 2010. To analyse the music itself, they used 30-second segments of more than 80 per cent of these singles — a total of more than 17,000 songs.

 

They then analysed each segment for harmonic features such as chord changes and for the quality of timbre, whether guitar or piano or orchestra based, for example. In total, they rated each song in one of 8 different harmonic categories and one of 8 different timbre categories.

 

They assumed that the specific combination of harmonic and timbre qualities determines the genre of music, whether rock, rap, country and so on. However, the standard definitions of music genres also capture non-musical features such as the age and ethnicity of the performers, as in classic rock or Korean pop and so on.

 

So the team used an algorithmic technique for finding clusters within networks of data to find objective categories of musical genre that depend only on the musical qualities. This technique threw up 13 separate styles of music.

 

An interesting question is what these styles represent. To find out, the team analysed the tags associated with each song on the Last-FM music discovery service. Using a technique from bioinformatics called enrichment analysis, they searched for tags that were more commonly associated with songs in each music style and then assumed that these gave a sense of the musical genres involved.

 

For example, they found that style 1 was associated with soul tags, style 2 with hip hop, style 3 with country music and easy listening, style 4 with jazz and blues and so on.

 

Finally, they plotted the popularity of each style over time.

 

The data allows them to settle some long standing debates among connoisseurs of popular music. One question is whether various practices in the music industry have led to a decline in the cultural variety of new music.

 

To study this issue, they developed several measures of diversity and tracked how they changed over time. “We found that although all four evolve, two — diversity and disparity — show the most striking changes, both declining to a minimum around 1984, but then rebounding and increasing to a maximum in the early 2000s.”"

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These Apps Use Quicker Interfaces To Encourage More People to Use Sound

These Apps Use Quicker Interfaces To Encourage More People to Use Sound | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
Convincing musicians to make use of sound is easy. And electronic musicians are even content with stunningly-complex interfaces, in exchange for deep control of sound.
But what about everyone else?
Users on mobile are certainly uploading sounds.
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5 Examples of Experimental Music Notation

5 Examples of Experimental Music Notation | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it

In the 1950s progressive composers broke from the 5 line music staff to experiment with new, more expressive forms of graphic music notation

Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

Five well known examples of experimental notation for music.
Introducing works by John Cage, Steve Reich, Brian Eno, Krzysztof Penderecki, and Corenlius Cardew. With sound.
“As Cardew says : “The notation is more important than the sound. Not the exactitude and success with which a notation notates a sound; but the musicalness of the notation in its notating.”

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Reconnect with Electronic Music’s Revolutionary Roots, in Stunning Images [Gallery, Videos]

Reconnect with Electronic Music’s Revolutionary Roots, in Stunning Images [Gallery, Videos] | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
Evgeny Sholpo, 1932. His Variophone was a kind of optical computer for sound. “On a western device, you push a button and get a result.
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Download Formalized Music: Thought and Mathematics in ...

Download Formalized Music: Thought and Mathematics in ... | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
Pendragon Press is proud to offer this new, revised, and expanded edition of Formalized Music, Iannis Xenakis's landmark book of 1971. In addition to three totally new chapters examining recent breakthroughs in music theory, two original ...
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For Orchestra - composition process

For Orchestra - composition process | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
evillinkpony asked: When you're writing an original composition, what's the thought process you go through? Just wondering as I've tried writing songs in the past and had trouble :/ Answer: Growing up...
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Sadly by your side - A music album and a processing/remixing tool by @angelo_seme / @fabrica

Sadly by your side - A music album and a processing/remixing tool by @angelo_seme / @fabrica | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
Developed by the italian interaction designer at Fabrica, Angelo Semeraro, ‘Sadly by your side’ is a music album where each song can be endlessly transformed depending on the images you focus on with your camera.
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

A visual input is converted into a new image (red, blue & black).
Each of these colors directly affects elements of the music.
In the end, each track is unique, with a remodelled harmony, melody and rhythm, constructed as a direct result of the environment captured by the camera. 
The phone is used as a window to the world, a world that alters the perception of the album.

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I analyzed the chords of 1300 popular songs for patterns. This is what I found. | Blog – Hooktheory

I analyzed the chords of 1300 popular songs for patterns. This is what I found. | Blog – Hooktheory | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

Most popular keys
Use of chords
What chord should come next?

“A multipart series looking at the statistics gathered from 1300 choruses, verses, etc. of popular songs to discover the answer to some interesting questions about how popular music is structured” 

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What Is [Live]? – The New Generation Of Live Techno - Attack Magazine

What Is [Live]? – The New Generation Of Live Techno - Attack Magazine | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
As the latest generation of live techno acts hit the road, we ask what defines ‘live’ electronic music. Is a backlash against lazy Ableton sets responsible for the most exciting live shows in decades?
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

A good read, even though these questions are the concerns of too few people. Still, wouldn't it help (and bring the audience aware of these questions) (and maybe become more critical of what they see / hear in electronic music) if we could find a way to visualize what the performers are doing ? how performers are handling sounds and how they arrange them together ? What are the choices made during live performances and live coding ? how do the performer make the sound evolve, the gestures, the controls ?…

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Designing music learning experiences with technology

Designing music learning experiences with technology | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
“This semester I’m working as a research assistant to Alex Ruthmann at NYU. The job includes helping him with a new joint music education and music technology class, Designing Technologies & Experiences for Music Making, Learning and Engagement.”
Via Simon Decreuze
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SphereTones

This is a visual instrument. In contrast to traditional composition methods this approach places intuition, randomness, playfulness in the focus. The body of...
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

SphereTones is an android app which purpose is to give access to melodic and rythmic constructions by adding circles on the desk.
You can choose an associated sample within a limited set (bells, clock, tom, piano…) at the creation of the object, then, you drag out a dot from the circle, which begin to rebound…
Its position around the circle defines its pitch. Its distance from the center defines the rythmic interval. You can zoom in or out to place more spheres,  or to mute some parts (muted when out of the screen).
Features :
- sample based

- pitch transformation (?) accorded to radial position
- rythm intervals created by (discrete) line length
- desk is zoomable + draggable

source: http://www.androidmusician.com/spheretones/ ;

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A card deck for musical motive composition

A card deck for musical motive composition | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

Visual representation has been early an important dimension for the musical phenomenon (memory, transmission) as well as a powerful tool for thoughts, idea formalization in the composition process. Moreover, toward the sonic complexity, abstraction is more like the way we think music.

 

A system for visual representation of sonic material is leading to a reflexion on its use, on the choices the composer has to face with, by facilitating manipulation and production of consistent musical structures. Since, how to represent sonic objects ? Schemes ? Motives ? How to cut in the sound variables ? How to organize a typology leading to a set of figures, graphic objects, respecting the sonic phenomenon and that doesn't limit the creativity of composers ? On which media would this system have more sense ? How to engage the user (composer) in this elaboration ? What are the uses, the needs ?

 

Last december (2012) I've made a first proposal : a set of cards standing for the different sonic elements (objects, effects, melodic, harmonic or rhythmic elements) that the user can manipulate to produce a graphical score.

 

There's no way for now to ear the result immediatly, just the score. But I ( or another musician or "producer" ) can interpret the score to ear the sound out of it. The scores, made by the players, are photographed and form a first collection of structures, made with this tool. Far from being perfect, this "beta version" allows me to test and adjust the system, the typology, to think further maybe to some digital implementation (on the computer, ipad, connected objects…)

 

THE RULES

— Parameters

choose a "Tempo" card

choose a "Rhythmic Signature" card

choose a "Mode" card

choose a "Scale"

choose an "Instrument Family"

— Melodic Motive

Choose the drawing card corresponding to the chosen Mode

chromatic circle : 12 peaks, diatonic circle : 7 peaks, heptatonic : 5 peaks

Draw a motive of your choice. The tonic is located on the top peak, and then, you don't have to know what notes are in the scale. The user draws the melodic path, ordering the notes in the little boxes around the figure. He can put silences or breaks by writing the number in the "silence box" at the bottom of the card, and then continue his path with following number.

— Harmonisation

As many "Notes" cards as necessary are aligned next to the drawing card, and then the user can specify the dynamic and duration on each note. He can chose a "Chord" card under the note of his choice.

— Transformation

Once the basic motive completed, he can choose some "Transformation" cards, that are going to apply on the motive in order to extend it by little variations.

 

THE LIMITS

• impossible to listen the sound of the cards (to improve that, I have written a small program that allows to listen the Scales and Chords before choosing them)

• The figure / drawing card has to be adapted with the rhythmic signature : it influences the duration of a measure, of a beat, of the motive

• This deck of cards is only inspired from traditional western theory.

• Not enough precision in the choice of the sound ( instrument / sonic object).

• Not enough liberty in the harmony choices. Maybe add some "intervals" cards ?

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This Guy Composed an Entire Album Using Playing Cards - Wired

This Guy Composed an Entire Album Using Playing Cards - Wired | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
When it came time to compose his band's new album, Ben Chasny didn't just sit down with a guitar and write some tunes. He sat down with a deck of cards, instead.
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

Guitarist Ben Chasny has created a musical composition technique based on a deck of cards, applying algorithmic thinking to creating art.
Inspired by Gaston Bachelard, Frances Yeats, Morton Feldman…  or Ramon Llull

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Braindance neuro art project

Braindance neuro art project | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
Description
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:
Braindance is a neuro-art project that links the gap between science and image, its goal being to visually document participants response to music they were hearing for the first time. The brainwaves of 20 volunteers were measured whilst listening to a musical piece made especially for the project by Kleemar. The results of the measurements were portrayed onto posters, which were displayed in an exhibition proceeding the experiment.
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Meet the Strange, Wonderful 70s Machine that Used AI to Make Music

Meet the Strange, Wonderful 70s Machine that Used AI to Make Music | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
The one sequencer that you can see in a computer museum. The original Triadex Muse. Photo (CC-BY) Michael Hicks.
The 70s were one heck of a groovy time.
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Otomata - Online Generative Musical Sequencer

Otomata - Online Generative Musical Sequencer | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

Otomata is a program conceptualized and developed by Batuhan Bozkurt, a sound artist and computer programmer from Istanbul.

Inspired by Cellular Automata or "Game of Life", the user gives birth to a note block by clicking the grid, then this block is starting to move up and down and interact with other notes. Uncontrolled and surprising behaviors start to happen.

Take a look to another mesmerizing generative instrument from the artist is called Circuli http://www.earslap.com/projectslab/circuli

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Hacklab Conversations: Artists and Designers, Underground and Industry, Talk About Creating Tools

Hacklab Conversations: Artists and Designers, Underground and Industry, Talk About Creating Tools | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
This habit of wanting to separate tools from “music” is surely a curious one. Instrument construction has always gone hand in hand with musicianship, a conversation between player and builder. It has defined the possibilities of performance.
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DigiBarn TV: Initial Demo of the Mockingbird Composer's tool at Xerox PARC Forum (Oct 30, 1980) - YouTube

DigiBarn TV: Initial Demo of the Mockingbird Composer's tool at Xerox PARC Forum (Oct 30, 1980) Mockingbird, a Musician's Amanuensis by Severo Ornstein and J...
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Experimenting with Musical Representation…

Experimenting with Musical Representation… | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it

image: Daniel Lentz

Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

the western musical score
chinese musical notation system
space left for performer's interpretation
the works of Iannis Xenakis
creating your own system of representation to find your direction or creation of music.

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Soundpainting

Soundpainting | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

Soundpainting is the universal multidisciplinary live composing sign language for musicians, actors, dancers, and visual artists, created by Walter Thompson in Woodstock, New York in 1974.

The Soundpainter (the composer) standing in front (usually) of the group communicates a series of signs using hand and body gestures indicating specific and/or aleatoric material to be performed by the group.

The gestures of the Soundpainting language are signed using the syntax of Who, What, How and When. There are many types of gestures, some indicating specific material to be performed as well as others indicating specific styles, genres, aleatoric concepts, improvisation, disciplines, stage positions, costumes, props, and many others.

source: http://www.soundpainting.com/ ;

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VISUAL MUSIO App by WOW (Tokyo, Sendai, London)

VISUAL MUSIO App by WOW (Tokyo, Sendai, London) | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
An iPad application VISUA MUSIO have just released in the Apple iTunes Store by WOW, visual design studio based in Tokyo, Sendai and London. This is the second application from their project AppArt, making animation naturally leads to making music.
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

"Since the early 20th century experimental filmmakers and animators have been intrigued by the relationships between sight and sound, visual imagery and musical composition, and have explored these in new and exciting forms of expression. From early films of dancing shapes painted directly onto film, moving along to a musical score, through to more complex precision controlled explorations of geometry and audio synthesis. With a lasting influence on modern computer animation and motion graphics."

"Visua Musio pays tribute to their investigations and draws on the combined histories of colour music, abstract film, stop motion animation, and geometric motion graphics to provide the user with a creative tool for sculpting their own visual music compositions. Ranging from simple dances of geometric shapes and synthetic sounds to more complex algorithmic visual symphonies the depth of possibilities are open to you. Experience the world of visual music."

source: http://www.appart.jp/index.html#/?3-en 

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NotateMe - Phones Take Note

Music composition and notation app from Neuratron, featuring powerful handwritten music recognition. For iOS and Android. http://www.facebook.com/neuratron -...
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

A few years ago, the company Neuratron have released a music scanning software able to recognize handwritten music. This tech is now served on mobiles and tablets, enabling composers to write music directly on their device. The app automaticly translates the written material into a proper score, in real time.

 

SOURCE: http://ipadmusiced.wordpress.com/2013/10/02/new-notation-app-does-handwritten-music/

ITUNES STORE: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/notateme/id699470139?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

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7 Sound Recordings Made Before Thomas Edison | BuzzFeed.com

7 Sound Recordings Made Before Thomas Edison | BuzzFeed.com | Music Representation as a Tool | Scoop.it
School taught us that Thomas Edison invented the phonograph in 1877 and was the first person to create a sound recording that could be immediately played back. But school didn't mention that people had been rendering music on paper for centuries, using graphic representations of frequency and duration that could be used to reproduce the sound. These artifacts were essentially unplayable for centuries, but historian and ethnomusicologist Patrick Feaster has deciphered and recreated sound from these documents in Pictures of Sound: One Thousand Years of Educed Audio, a CD and book package released last year by the Dust-to-Digital record label. This set features computer-generated renditions of music dating back to 980 A.D. The project began when Feaster teamed up with the label to produce a vinyl single of a fragment of "Au Clair de la Lune" that French scientist Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville had captured on paper with a machine called a phonautograph in 1860, nearly two decades before Edison made his first audio recording. Scott de Martinville wanted to preserve the performances of actors and singers with an audio equivalent of photography. He correctly deduced that he would need to create an "artificial ear" to capture the vibrations in the air that humans process as we listen to sound. His invention, the phonautograph, was the first machine that ever recorded sound waves over time, but he had only aimed to represent the sound on paper as a way of improving upon written language, which could not adequately convey tonality, intensity, or timbre. He had hoped that people would eventually learn to read phonautograms by eye, and translate the sound in their minds in a way similar to how we read words on a page. Click headline to read more--
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Scape - an app by Brian Eno and Peter Chilvers

Scape Available now for iPad http://www.generativemusic.com Scape makes music that thinks for itself. From Brian Eno and Peter Chilvers, creators of Bloom, S...
Morgan Prudhomme's insight:

Looks ugly but nice idea. Compose music as a landscape !

I would love to see the algorithms, to see how elements interact with each others.

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