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Spotify nation: Sweden shows why streaming is future of music

Spotify nation: Sweden shows why streaming is future of music | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

 

For the first time, streaming is to be included in the UK singles chart. This announcement was followed by reports that digital music sales now account for more than half the UK record industry’s income. But the royalties gleaned from streaming are often the subject of much complaint, most recently with musician Zoe Keating’s publication of the breakdown of her income last year, 92% of which came from sales – US$75,341 – with only US$6,380 coming from streaming services. It is obvious that the music industry is swiftly changing, but the wider effects this may have are unclear.

 

Sweden, as the home of Spotify, is ahead of the UK in the digital music world. We included streaming in our charts in September 2013, and internet-driven revenue – downloads and streaming – accounts for about 70% of the market here. So looking at the changes that have been occurring here may give some indication of the UK’s future.

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LA Studio Musicians Income Fell 68% - hypebot

LA Studio Musicians Income Fell 68% - hypebot | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

According to a report released on Dec. 15 by the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, recording-session wages have dropped 68% over the last 15 years. A profession once generating $50 million in income for its workers hit an all time low of $15.5 million in 2013. Studio musicians in LA desperate for change are looking to their union leaders and expressing their frustrations - and they aren't the only ones frustrated.

 

The Nashville Songwriters Association International say that the number of full-time songwriters in Nashville has fallen by a staggering 80 percent since 2000. The unrelenting decline in album sales hit a new low this summer when they went below 4 million in August - a first for the industry since it started tracking data in 1991. Streaming services like Spotify, Pandora, etc. have been a breath of life into a bleeding industry, but even as popularity rises, their sustainability has proved fleeting and their payouts certainly don't sustain careers.

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What the Vinyl "Comeback" Really Looks Like... - Digital Music News

What the Vinyl "Comeback" Really Looks Like... - Digital Music News | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
source: Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).  All figures in millions, US-based, and inflation-adjusted.  
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Streaming: the future of the music industry, or its nightmare?

Streaming: the future of the music industry, or its nightmare? | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
Apple and Google are muscling in on streaming as revenues rise, but not everyone is happy
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Bandcamp Eases Indies' Worry Over New Tax Changes in Europe

Bandcamp Eases Indies' Worry Over New Tax Changes in Europe | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
Uproar from the independent community over the potentially devastating impact that upcoming changes to European Union tax regulations will have on digital music sales has resulted in Bandcamp revising its tax policy in artists' favour.
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Independent musicians hit out at new VAT rules on digital downloads

Independent musicians hit out at new VAT rules on digital downloads | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
Independent musicians have attacked new VAT rules on artists who sell digital downloads via independent websites such as Bandcamp. The new legislation means that British artists will have to be register themselves as independent VAT-eligible companies.

The rules, which come into effect on Thursday (January 1), are set to hit independent musicians. Even if artists only sell one download, they have to be VAT-registered under the new rules. Major online retailers such as iTunes and Amazon won’t be affected, as they already incorporate VAT registration as part of their trading agreements.

Future Of The Left have announced they will no longer sell digital downloads via Bandcamp as they can’t afford to spend the necessary time and money registering themselves for VAT, which stands at 20% in the UK.

In a series of tweets, singer Andy Falkous said: “On an entirely selfish note, that’s my plan for surviving next year financially hugely compromised. A delight. I realise it affects other people, but I reserve the right to think about paying the rent whilst close to tears. This affects anybody who sells even one copy in the EU. In most cases, it will make digital products more expensive for EU residents, unless the business is willing or able to swallow the cost.”

Read more at http://www.nme.com/news/future-of-the-left/81970#riFcZJhjyuIDFlct.99
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Trends: The emerging digital spectrum, and the challenge of freemium | Complete Music Update

Trends: The emerging digital spectrum, and the challenge of freemium | Complete Music Update | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
The highly public debate initiated by Taylor Swift’s withdrawal from Spotify last month ultimately led to the usual chattering about what royalties, precisely, any one artist is earning from any one digital service as compared to another. But it also brought a much more interesting element of the digital music discussion to the fore. What should freemium look like? It’s an important question that will play a key role in how the digital market will mature in the next five years.

THE STORY SO FAR
If we take 1998 as the year when the potential of digital music first began to become apparent – the world wide web and MP3 having emerged earlier in the 1990s and the first few digital music start-ups, notably MP3.com and eMusic, having just launched – for much of the following decade the major music companies’ default response to most proposed digital business models seemed to be “no”.

Indeed, for the next five years major record company executives seemed to be in denial (digital would never go mainstream like the CD), or protectionist mood (CD sales must be protected from rising online piracy) or control freak mode (if digital music channels have potential, we should control those channels). Needless to say, none of these strategies worked.

During these first five years an assortment of digital music start-ups – mainly though not exclusively download-based – came to market, though few secured major label content (and some had only unsigned artists). But one player, Apple, managed to persuade or bully the majors to come on board, and so in 2003 the iTunes Store went live in the US. The majors insisted on digital rights management technology being added to Apple’s proprietary file format, but initially conceded to the IT giant’s one-price-fits-all 99-cents-per-download approach. Which looked good on a poster.

It’s fair to say, the iTunes Store worked. In fact, it really worked. Especially in the US and the UK. And for most of the next five years, when it came to new digital businesses, the majors said “yes” to anything that replicated iTunes, but remained resistant to anything else. Which was, in theory, good news to those with ambitions in the download space, though the continued insistence by the majors on DRM meant start-ups couldn’t sell MP3s, which meant their music wouldn’t work on the market-leading iPod, which made it all but impossible to succeed.

- See more at: http://www.completemusicupdate.com/article/trends-the-emerging-digital-spectrum-and-the-challenge-of-freemium/#sthash.hIdsc2Rr.dpufThe highly public debate initiated by Taylor Swift’s withdrawal from Spotify last month ultimately led to the usual chattering about what royalties, precisely, any one artist is earning from any one digital service as compared to another. But it also brought a much more interesting element of the digital music discussion to the fore. What should freemium look like? It’s an important question that will play a key role in how the digital market will mature in the next five years.

THE STORY SO FAR
If we take 1998 as the year when the potential of digital music first began to become apparent – the world wide web and MP3 having emerged earlier in the 1990s and the first few digital music start-ups, notably MP3.com and eMusic, having just launched – for much of the following decade the major music companies’ default response to most proposed digital business models seemed to be “no”.

Indeed, for the next five years major record company executives seemed to be in denial (digital would never go mainstream like the CD), or protectionist mood (CD sales must be protected from rising online piracy) or control freak mode (if digital music channels have potential, we should control those channels). Needless to say, none of these strategies worked.

During these first five years an assortment of digital music start-ups – mainly though not exclusively download-based – came to market, though few secured major label content (and some had only unsigned artists). But one player, Apple, managed to persuade or bully the majors to come on board, and so in 2003 the iTunes Store went live in the US. The majors insisted on digital rights management technology being added to Apple’s proprietary file format, but initially conceded to the IT giant’s one-price-fits-all 99-cents-per-download approach. Which looked good on a poster.

It’s fair to say, the iTunes Store worked. In fact, it really worked. Especially in the US and the UK. And for most of the next five years, when it came to new digital businesses, the majors said “yes” to anything that replicated iTunes, but remained resistant to anything else. Which was, in theory, good news to those with ambitions in the download space, though the continued insistence by the majors on DRM meant start-ups couldn’t sell MP3s, which meant their music wouldn’t work on the market-leading iPod, which made it all but impossible to succeed.

- See more at: http://www.completemusicupdate.com/article/trends-the-emerging-digital-spectrum-and-the-challenge-of-freemium/#sthash.hIdsc2Rr.dpuf
Catherine Hol's insight:

Really worth reading the whole thing ... great insight from CMU.

The highly public debate initiated by Taylor Swift’s withdrawal from Spotify last month ultimately led to the usual chattering about what royalties, precisely, any one artist is earning from any one digital service as compared to another. But it also brought a much more interesting element of the digital music discussion to the fore. What should freemium look like? It’s an important question that will play a key role in how the digital market will mature in the next five years.

THE STORY SO FAR
If we take 1998 as the year when the potential of digital music first began to become apparent – the world wide web and MP3 having emerged earlier in the 1990s and the first few digital music start-ups, notably MP3.com and eMusic, having just launched – for much of the following decade the major music companies’ default response to most proposed digital business models seemed to be “no”.

Indeed, for the next five years major record company executives seemed to be in denial (digital would never go mainstream like the CD), or protectionist mood (CD sales must be protected from rising online piracy) or control freak mode (if digital music channels have potential, we should control those channels). Needless to say, none of these strategies worked.

During these first five years an assortment of digital music start-ups – mainly though not exclusively download-based – came to market, though few secured major label content (and some had only unsigned artists). But one player, Apple, managed to persuade or bully the majors to come on board, and so in 2003 the iTunes Store went live in the US. The majors insisted on digital rights management technology being added to Apple’s proprietary file format, but initially conceded to the IT giant’s one-price-fits-all 99-cents-per-download approach. Which looked good on a poster.

It’s fair to say, the iTunes Store worked. In fact, it really worked. Especially in the US and the UK. And for most of the next five years, when it came to new digital businesses, the majors said “yes” to anything that replicated iTunes, but remained resistant to anything else. Which was, in theory, good news to those with ambitions in the download space, though the continued insistence by the majors on DRM meant start-ups couldn’t sell MP3s, which meant their music wouldn’t work on the market-leading iPod, which made it all but impossible to succeed.

- See more at: http://www.completemusicupdate.com/article/trends-the-emerging-digital-spectrum-and-the-challenge-of-freemium/#sthash.hIdsc2Rr.dpufThe highly public debate initiated by Taylor Swift’s withdrawal from Spotify last month ultimately led to the usual chattering about what royalties, precisely, any one artist is earning from any one digital service as compared to another. But it also brought a much more interesting element of the digital music discussion to the fore. What should freemium look like? It’s an important question that will play a key role in how the digital market will mature in the next five years.

THE STORY SO FAR
If we take 1998 as the year when the potential of digital music first began to become apparent – the world wide web and MP3 having emerged earlier in the 1990s and the first few digital music start-ups, notably MP3.com and eMusic, having just launched – for much of the following decade the major music companies’ default response to most proposed digital business models seemed to be “no”.

Indeed, for the next five years major record company executives seemed to be in denial (digital would never go mainstream like the CD), or protectionist mood (CD sales must be protected from rising online piracy) or control freak mode (if digital music channels have potential, we should control those channels). Needless to say, none of these strategies worked.

During these first five years an assortment of digital music start-ups – mainly though not exclusively download-based – came to market, though few secured major label content (and some had only unsigned artists). But one player, Apple, managed to persuade or bully the majors to come on board, and so in 2003 the iTunes Store went live in the US. The majors insisted on digital rights management technology being added to Apple’s proprietary file format, but initially conceded to the IT giant’s one-price-fits-all 99-cents-per-download approach. Which looked good on a poster.

It’s fair to say, the iTunes Store worked. In fact, it really worked. Especially in the US and the UK. And for most of the next five years, when it came to new digital businesses, the majors said “yes” to anything that replicated iTunes, but remained resistant to anything else. Which was, in theory, good news to those with ambitions in the download space, though the continued insistence by the majors on DRM meant start-ups couldn’t sell MP3s, which meant their music wouldn’t work on the market-leading iPod, which made it all but impossible to succeed.

- See more at: http://www.completemusicupdate.com/article/trends-the-emerging-digital-spectrum-and-the-challenge-of-freemium/#sthash.hIdsc2Rr.dpuf
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Fat Possum Opens Its Own Vinyl Pressing Plant to Meet (It's Own) Demand

Fat Possum Opens Its Own Vinyl Pressing Plant to Meet (It's Own) Demand | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

Memphis Record Pressing, a new vinyl pressing plant dreamed up and run by Fat Possum founder Matthew Johnson, that is ready for business 10 months after construction began in March of this year.

 

The True Story of How Vinyl Spun Its Way Back From Near-Extinction

"I’ve had 3,000 Modest Mouse records stuck in customs that’s cost me $100,000 at Christmas," Johnson tells Billboard on a frigid night at an East Village bar. "I’m tired of all that shit. I hate this business. It's getting so bad. If I want to sit down, I feel like I have to cut a tree down, cut it into boards, make a chair -- it’s ridiculous. You used to not have to worry about manufacturing. Now you do."

 

Black Friday Brings Rough Sales Numbers for Music Retailers, High Notes for Vinyl and Online

 

Not one to mince words unless it's to speak in metaphors, Johnson is referring to one of the most pervasive problems in pressing records: backorders. Though the recent vinyl boom has been a boon for manufacturers like Nashville's United Record Pressing or Canoga Park, Calif.'s Rainbo Records, it's also resulted in a sales surge that often overwhelms the country's existing 16 plants, as Vice's Motherboard pointed out earlier this year. "United is five months backordered, and everyone else is that or more," says Johnson. "We used to be able to get these turned around in seven weeks."

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The Power of False Pretense | Music Business Journal | Berklee College of Music

The Power of False Pretense | Music Business Journal | Berklee College of Music | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
YouTube wiped out millions of music videos in Dec. 2012 after auditors found views had been grossly exaggerated. After an internal audit, there was speculation of foul play all over, spilling into Sony Music, Universal Music, and Google—all joint-venture owners of VEVO. In effect, on Jan. 2013, Lady Gaga was stripped of 156 million YouTube views from her VEVO Channel and the removal appeared to be part of a broad clean up of bot generated views at YouTube. After the purge, a former YouTube employee who used the alias ‘Spk’ was allegedly connected to VEVO. Spk claimed to have an empire of bots that inflated views on various video games such as Diablo 3 and social media sites including Twitter and Reddit; he said his views bot was so successful that Google asked him to use it for VEVO back when the music conglomerate first started putting content on YouTube. “I had to sit there and bot videos with millions and millions [of views]…[for]more than 20,000 videos.” In 2009, Spk started his own botting business (“I am doing nothing different, just working for myself”). He currently employs 15 people, and his most notable hire is botting reseller Tapangoldy.

YouTube has refused to comment on Spk’s history at VEVO. It will only say that it paid Spk handsomely for addressing an internal security issue, and in fact Spk is listed in Google’s Hall of Fame Security Site. In the meantime, new evidence of the boosting of artificial likes is making headlines. Kanye West’s video “Heartless”, for example, gained 33 million views in one day which Spk, again, claimed he botted per YouTube’s request. By comparison, “Gangnam Style”, the most popular video in YouTube history, never saw more than 3 million views a day. Further, all of Britney Spears’s music videos that aired before the creation of VEVO were likely botted. The artist’s 2005 hit, “Toxic” received more than 30 million views in a 24-hour period—again making it suspicious. View data for The Backstreet Boys and N’SYNC music videos point to a similar story. Lady Gaga’s first hit “Just Dance”, which was uploaded to VEVO after the song had already made the rounds on radio, television, and the pop charts, was surely inflated because views there were later purged.
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The Streaming Price Bible - Spotify, YouTube and What 1 Million Plays Means to You!

The Streaming Price Bible - Spotify, YouTube and What 1 Million Plays Means to You! | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

If the services at the top of the list like Nokia, Google Play and Xbox Music can pay more per play, why can’t the services at the bottom of the list like Spotify and YouTube?

 

We’ll give you a hint, the less streams/plays there are the more each play pays. The more plays there are the less each stream/play pays. Tell us again about how these services will scale. Looking at this data it seems pretty clear that the larger the service get’s, the less artists are paid per stream.

 

So do you think streaming royalty rates are really going to increase as these services “scale”? No, we didn’t either.

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Samsung and Telstra close online music services

Samsung and Telstra close online music services | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

Samsung has revealed it will draw the final curtain on its Music Hub streaming service by the end of the year, just days after Telstra announced its plans to axe BigPond Music downloads.

 

According to an announcement on the Music Hub website, customers will no longer be able to access their accounts after 31 December 2014.

 

Existing subscriptions will not be renewed after 30 November, and Music Hub will not accept new paid memberships. Access via gift vouchers will still be accepted until 31 December, and customers with prepaid subscriptions extending beyond the deadline are being directed to the Music Hub support line.

 

It's been a rough few days for digital music services in Australia. Earlier in the week Telstra said it will close its digital music download platform BigPond Music (BPM) on 12 December. From this date, customers will no longer be able to purchase music or access their accounts, according to a notification on the BPM website.


Read more: http://www.choice.com.au/media-and-news/consumer-news/news/aussies-lose-two-digital-music-services-in-one-week-271114.aspx#ixzz3KJEZ3QHZ

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Irving Azoff Says YouTube Lacks Licensing Rights to 20,000 Songs (Exclusive)

Irving Azoff Says YouTube Lacks Licensing Rights to 20,000 Songs (Exclusive) | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

Many works composed by popular musicians including The Eagles, Pharrell Williams, Boston, Foreigner, John Lennon, Smokey Robinson, Chris Cornell and George and Ira Gershwin could be headed off YouTube.

 

On Wednesday (Nov. 12), just as Google announced the coming launch of YouTube Music Key, its much-anticipated subscription service to compete against Spotify and Pandora, a compensation dispute was triggered. Music industry heavyweight Irving Azoff tells The Hollywood Reporterthat he is prepared to take 42 of his clients, representing some 20,000 copyrighted works, away from the YouTube ecosystem, including the new subscription service. The move is a huge shot across Google's bow, perhaps even more significant than Taylor Swift's much-discussed decision a week ago to remove her songs from Spotify over doubts about royalties.

 

Azoff is the former chairman of Live Nation who is now spearheading a new venture, Global Music Rights (GMR), aimed at extracting higher performance rights royalties for songwriters. Traditionally, those rights have been handled by ASCAP and BMI, which have been hamstrung by consent decrees with the Justice Department that requires a license be given whenever an outlet requests it.

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Music subscription services face a difficult balancing act between price and value

Music subscription services face a difficult balancing act between price and value | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

Just how important music is to consumers was one of the many questions included in a consumer survey conducted by Music & Copyrightpublisher Ovum in July. Over a three-week period, 15,000+ consumers across 15 countries were asked a number of questions about their media use. In terms of importance, music was considered essential by 42% of respondents, and important by a further 43%.

 

Although listening to music was less important than browsing the Internet and reading the news, it was considered more essential that interacting on social media and watching TV. Only 16% of respondents said listening to music was unimportant.

 

Comparing the survey findings with the current state of the recorded-music industry suggests a large proportion of consumers’ interest in listening is not being satisfied by paid-for services. Annual sales of recorded music have been falling for more than 10 years and 2014 is expected to add one more to the total number of consecutive years of annual contraction.

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Breaking: YouTube Says Zoë Keating's Claims Are 'Patently False'... - Digital Music News

Breaking: YouTube Says Zoë Keating's Claims Are 'Patently False'... - Digital Music News | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
Last updated: Friday, 7:10 pm PT  Sat., 10:25 am PT YouTube is now aggressively responding to Zoë Keating’s post about Music Key, calling her claims...
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More Teens Listen to Spotify and Pandora Than FM Radio... - Digital Music News

More Teens Listen to Spotify and Pandora Than FM Radio... - Digital Music News | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

It’s official: according to data just released by Edison Research, more American teenagers listen to Spotify, Pandora, and other streaming music services than traditional, FM broadcast radio.  The finding comes from Edison’s ‘Share of Ear’ report, which measures all forms of music listening, including downloads, streaming services, online radio, and traditional AM/FM broadcast channels.

 

Most major radio stations also simulcast their streams online, but according to Edison, that isn’t really helping.  Instead, web-born platforms are easily commanding greater share.  Edison also tallied time spent with Pandora and Spotify rivals like Beats Music, iTunes Radio, and Rhapsody, though those contributions are mostly marginal.  Indeed, Pandora and Spotify have emerged as the 800,000 lb. gorillas in the streaming space, and are now taking over a jungle once ruled by big, broadcast beasts (alongside stuff like CDs and downloads).

 

In total, Edison found that the average American teenager (between the ages of 13 and 17) listens to just over 4 hours of audio a day.  Overall, Edison polled more than 2,000 Americans aged 13 or older for the finding.

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#Outlook15: How Indian Online Music Companies view 2015

#Outlook15: How Indian Online Music Companies view 2015 | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

 

As a part of our #Outlook15 series, we asked heads of online music companies about their focus areas for 2015, and the challenges that the online music ecosystem needs to address in 2015. We got responses from Gaana, OK Listen, Believe Digital.

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Music Sales Down In Almost Every Category In 2014 [Year End Stats] - hypebot

Music Sales Down In Almost Every Category In 2014 [Year End Stats] - hypebot | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
U.S. music sales were down in virtually every category in 2014 compared to 2013, according to year end stats shared by Nielson. Only vinyl was up, an impressive 54%. The culprit? Streaming music - both free and paid- jumped 54%, as more and more consumers shifted from buying music to borrowing it. Nielsen Music's 2014 At-A-Glance: Overall On-Demand (Audio+Video) Streams 2014 – 164 Billion 2013 – 106 Billion +54% “Digital music consumption continues its robust growth, with On-Demand streaming up 54% over last year and 164 billion song streams being played in 2014 ,” says David Bakula, SVP Industry Insights,...
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Paid Music Downloads On The Decline, Vinyl Sales Increase

Paid Music Downloads On The Decline, Vinyl Sales Increase | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

A couple of years ago, the download of music (at least legally) was pretty high and climbing, but according to a recent report from Nielsen, it looks like music downloads are actually on the decline. The latest numbers gathered by Nielsen have revealed that paid downloads for albums and songs have declined by 9% and 12% respectively.


However interestingly enough despite the decline in paid music downloads, Nielsen found that the sales of vinyl music have actually increased. For 2014, vinyl sales were at 9.2 million which is a 52% increase from 2013 and the highest ever since SoundScan had started tracking its sales from back in 1991.

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From Taylor Swift to Hozier 2014 was dominated by solo artists - Independent.ie

From Taylor Swift to Hozier 2014 was dominated by solo artists - Independent.ie | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

It felt significant that Swift's nearest challengers in 2014 - among them Ed Sheeran, sad soul-boy Sam Smith and interview-adverse Wicklow native Hozier - were also solo artists. In 2014, standing on your own two feet was the prevailing trend; it is hard to think of a new band which meaningfully impacted on public discourse (there continues to be One Direction of course, much as there continue to be clouds even on a sunny day).

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Trends: As the GRD runs aground, what next? | Complete Music Update

Trends: As the GRD runs aground, what next? | Complete Music Update | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
Well, some people are happy with the complexities. Not least, the rapidly growing rights administration sector, which works for rights owners, artists and licensees.

Plenty of entrepreneurs have recognised that there is money to be made by helping other people navigate the complexities of copyright ownership.

There are now agencies working for rights owners who are keen to ensure they are getting every penny they are due, artists who suspect they are not receiving all their neighbouring rights income, and licensees who can’t face the thought of identifying and dealing with multiple stakeholders to use a single recording of a single song.

These companies would still have a role to play even without the complexities – as efficient administrators and effective deal makers – though with copyright ownership information sometimes so hard to find, those with the knowledge and patience to navigate the complex licensing ecosystem can charge a fee for that service.

Cynics might also argue that collecting societies have something to gain from the complexities, which possibly meant it was unwise to have them as the principle funders of the GRD.
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INSIGHT: From Wearable Tech To Music - 3 Things Snapchat’s Leaked Emails Reveal

INSIGHT: From Wearable Tech To Music - 3 Things Snapchat’s Leaked Emails Reveal | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
Ephemeral messaging service Snapchat has acquired a wearable tech startup, a video software company and is looking to become a record label. That’s according to emails leaked as part of the Sony hack which highlight some big ambitions for the company....
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Bitcoin for Rockstars: How Cryptocurrency Can Revolutionize The Music Industry - hypebot

Bitcoin for Rockstars: How Cryptocurrency Can Revolutionize The Music Industry - hypebot | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

There is an incredibly boring problem in the music industry for which Bitcoin offers a potentially fascinating solution. In fact, I think this might be one of the coolest and most immediately worthwhile applications of distributed ledger and payment network technologies such as Bitcoin.

 

The problem is simply that no central database exists to keep track of information about music. Specifically, there are two types of information about a piece of music that are critically important: who made it and who owns the rights to it. Right now, this information is fiendishly difficult to track down, to the great detriment of artists, music services and consumers alike.

 

Decentralized, open-source, global cyryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Ripple (full disclosure: I am an investor in Ripple Labs, which is developing this currency) offer a model for how we might address this bedeviling status quo. By applying the technical breakthroughs of these networks, we can sensibly organize data about music for the first time in human history and, more importantly, reinvent the way artists and rights-holders get paid.

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Spotify Lost $71.7 Million Last Year... - Digital Music News

Spotify Lost $71.7 Million Last Year... - Digital Music News | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
…from Spotify’s latest financial report for year ending 2013, filed this morning:        
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Billboard, Changing the Charts, Will Count Streaming Services

Billboard, Changing the Charts, Will Count Streaming Services | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
Billboard and Nielsen SoundScan will start adding streams to the formula behind the Billboard 200.
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Are ASCAP, BMI Obsolete? #1 Music Publisher Sony/ATV Preparing To Exit - hypebot

Are ASCAP, BMI Obsolete? #1 Music Publisher Sony/ATV Preparing To Exit - hypebot | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

Are ASCAP and BMI obsolete? Sony/ATV, arguably the world's #1 publishing company, seems to think so, and is preparing to pull out of both before the end of the year, according to reports surfacing yesterday. Sony/ATV head Martin Bandier had told members in July that he was considering such a move as a way to open direct negotiations with digital and broadcast outlets. But now it appears all but certain. The loss of one or more top publishers could cripple both ASCAP and BMI financially ...

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