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Why Labels Are Sitting on a Time-Bomb of YouTube Lawsuits... - Digital Music News

Why Labels Are Sitting on a Time-Bomb of YouTube Lawsuits... - Digital Music News | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
The following guest post comes from Jeff Price, founder of Audiam, a company that is navigating tricky issues related to YouTube placement and monetization.  ...
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Is the Long War Between American Radio and the Record Business About to End?

Is the Long War Between American Radio and the Record Business About to End? | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
It's just like old times. In a skirmish nearly a century old, the broadcast radio and recording industries are squaring off once again, over master recording performance rights.
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What Live Nation's Bonnaroo Buy Means for Indie Festivals

What Live Nation's Bonnaroo Buy Means for Indie Festivals | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
The large festival business, once an opportunity for entrepreneurs to enter the game, has become increasingly devoid of independent players as as the live music business shifts to tours bankrolled by global promoters.
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Senate Examines Songwriter Compensation In Effort To Determine The Worth Of A Song - hypebot

Senate Examines Songwriter Compensation In Effort To Determine The Worth Of A Song - hypebot | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

Since May 2013, the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet has undertaken a comprehensive review of the entire Copyright Act, including many issues of importance to musicians and songwriters.


But the Act is not the only regulatory structure that impacts how creators are compensated. On Tuesday March 10, the Senate Judiciary Committee on Antitrust, Competition Policy, and Consumer Rightstook a look at another piece of the puzzle: the “consent decrees” that govern America’s two largest Performance Rights Organizations (PROs), ASCAP & BMI


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One Third of US Consumers Still Buy Music Downloads, Despite Streaming's Gained Momentum - hypebot

One Third of US Consumers Still Buy Music Downloads, Despite Streaming's Gained Momentum - hypebot | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

Although music streaming is getting the biggest headlines these days, recent research from MusicWatch, a company providing consumer research for the music industry, indicates that consumers have not entirely given up on paid music downloads. In fact, one third of U.S. consumers purchased music downloads last year. 

 

According to recently released data from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), paid downloads accounted for 37 percent of U.S. music revenues, while streaming contributed 27 percent.

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20% of people online are music pirates - but most know it's theft - Music Business Worldwide

20% of people online are music pirates - but most know it's theft - Music Business Worldwide | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

New evidence suggests that one fifth of all fixed-line internet users across the world regularly access services offering copyright-infringing music.

 

The stat comes from global record label trade body the IFPI, and is based on consumer data from ComScore and Nielsen.

When you consider that there are more than 3 billion people online in the world today, the severity of the music business’s ongoing piracy problem becomes clear.

 

Indeed, in its new Digital Music Report, the IFPI estimates that across 2014, there were 4 billion music downloads via BitTorrent sites alone – not taking into account cyberlockers, social media and other sources of pirated material.

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Independent Music Videos Gain Acceptance

Independent Music Videos Gain Acceptance | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
TORONTO, ON--(Marketwired - April 16, 2015) - YANGAROO Inc. (TSX VENTURE: YOO) (OTCBB: YOOIF), the industry's leading secure digital media management company today announced that its research shows that over 50% of independently produced music videos have been accepted for airing by major national music video networks in the U.S....
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10 things we learned from a day of indie labels talking digital music

10 things we learned from a day of indie labels talking digital music | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

Playlists are an important new currency on streaming services, from those created by fans that have picked up hundreds of thousands of followers, to the ones curated by labels, and the ones on Spotify’s homepage created by its own editorial team.

 

Getting songs on to popular playlists is increasingly important to labels, but there may be potential for shenanigans.

 

Some indie labels worry that major labels will start putting more pressure on Spotify to include more of their songs, while others note that some independent creators of popular playlists are hoping to charge money to add tracks – in the same way that some YouTube gamers have started charging developers to put their games in a video.

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The music industry wants to fight the internet again—and it’s probably going to lose

The music industry wants to fight the internet again—and it’s probably going to lose | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
Trying to cut off free music streaming services may just drive everyone back to piracy.
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Playing to our strengths by tuning up the Irish music industry - Independent.ie

Playing to our strengths by tuning up the Irish music industry - Independent.ie | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

We now have an opportunity to position Ireland as the world's leading location to create music. By investing in our music, we're investing in our economic future.

 

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Nearly Half of YouTube's Top Channels Are Music-Related... - Digital Music News

Nearly Half of YouTube's Top Channels Are Music-Related... - Digital Music News | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
…from TubeFilter’s Top 50 Most Viewed Channels In the US (week ending 2/20/2015).
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iTunes Is Removing Music From Indie Labels To Promote Major Artists

iTunes Is Removing Music From Indie Labels To Promote Major Artists | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

While the eyes of the music industry are all pointed in the direction of Apple’s forthcoming interactive streaming service, which many expect to launch this year, the company has been busy cleaning house and making big changes in its famous download store.

 

Label executives believe the changes being made to iTunes are tied closely to whatever the tech giant is planning for its revamped Beats digital streaming service, though not all of them are enthusiastic about the changes being made to the world’s biggest digital music retailer.

 

As Billboard reports, on the surface, the changes appear to benefit major labels at the expense of independent outlets, leaving the indie sector with a diminished standing compared to where they were previously inside of the store, which is to say competitive.

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BBC Radio 6 Music leads the way as radio’s digital revolution gathers momentum

BBC Radio 6 Music leads the way as radio’s digital revolution gathers momentum | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

The alternative music station has broken through the two-million audience barrier, becoming the first digital-only station to reach that landmark in the UK. Five years after a successful listener revolt against a management attempt to close the nascent station, due to a perceived lack of “impact”, 6 Music has overtaken Radio 3’s FM audience, without diluting its commitment to airing cult tracks and sessions from the BBC archives alongside cutting-edge new artists.

 

Lamacq, 49, a Radio 1 refugee, is now Britain’s most popular digital DJ, with a daily tea-time show whose audience of more than 900,000 now exceeds that for Lauren Laverne’s morning show.

 

Radio listeners tuning in at home are more likely to do so on digital than FM or AM for the first time, last week’s figures revealed. The proportion of in-home radio listening via digital platforms such as digital audio broadcasting (DAB) radios grew to 46.2 per cent in the final three months of last year, overtaking analogue (45.6 per cent).

Almost 28 million people now tune in to radio via a digitally enabled receiver (DAB, Digital TV or online) each week. Listeners will be given more choice with the award of a new national commercial network, boasting up to 18 new stations, set to be launched in 2016.

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Q&A: Charles Caldas, Merlin | Complete Music Update

Q&A: Charles Caldas, Merlin | Complete Music Update | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
 Friday 6 February 2015, 17:48 | By CMU EditorialQ&A: Charles Caldas, MerlinBusiness Interviews

 

This interview appeared in the December 2014 edition of the CMU Trends Report. Buy our reports from the CMU Shop or get every edition by signing up for CMU Premium. 

The continued rise of the streaming sector was undoubtedly the most important trend for the record industry in 2014, and to a great extent for the wider music business too. As streaming income grows at an incredible pace, while CD sales continue to decline and, in some markets, download revenues have also peaked, that services like Pandora and Spotify are key to the future of music is now undeniable. Though there’s been plenty of debate about how the streaming music business is evolving, and what the streaming sector could and should look like.

Charles Caldas runs Merlin, the agency that negotiates and administrates digital deals on behalf of a sizable slice of the independent record industry; and he has negotiated deals for his member labels and distributors with most of the key players in the streaming sector. As well as having access to its own stats and data, Merlin also conducts an annual survey of its members, published each summer, to gauge their opinions and thoughts on trends in the digital domain.

Tapping into both that research and his day-to-day dealings with the streaming business, Caldas spoke to CMU Business Editor Chris Cooke about the current state of play, the big debates, and his own organisation’s recent deal with Pandora and its new office Stateside.

CC: Looking at your membership survey from back in the summer, and from speaking more informally to labels of all kinds, a trend in the last couple of years seems to be that the shift from physical to digital, and downloading to streaming, is happening faster in the indie sector than in the record industry overall. Why do you think that is the case?
CCal: I’m not sure it’s all happening faster, for example the drop in download sales amongst our members seems less pronounced than in industry-wide figures. But I definitely think the independents are adapting quickly and creatively to the shifts in market dynamics, and their success over the past year – both in the overall growth of the business and at a mainstream chart level – underlines that.

It’s possible that indie labels are primarily selling to the kind of consumer who is naturally shifting faster from one model to the next. But I think the rate of growth the indies are seeing in streaming is also due to the nature of those platforms and the ways the indies use them. In physical, indies were often at a disadvantage because of barriers to entry, to getting records into high street record stores. Many of those barriers were removed by downloading, though most download stores were built to mirror the record shop experience, just with a lot more shelf space.

- See more at: http://www.completemusicupdate.com/article/qa-charles-caldas-merlin/#sthash.NzyoKSA9.dpuf Friday 6 February 2015, 17:48 | By CMU EditorialQ&A: Charles Caldas, MerlinBusiness Interviews

 

This interview appeared in the December 2014 edition of the CMU Trends Report. Buy our reports from the CMU Shop or get every edition by signing up for CMU Premium. 

The continued rise of the streaming sector was undoubtedly the most important trend for the record industry in 2014, and to a great extent for the wider music business too. As streaming income grows at an incredible pace, while CD sales continue to decline and, in some markets, download revenues have also peaked, that services like Pandora and Spotify are key to the future of music is now undeniable. Though there’s been plenty of debate about how the streaming music business is evolving, and what the streaming sector could and should look like.

Charles Caldas runs Merlin, the agency that negotiates and administrates digital deals on behalf of a sizable slice of the independent record industry; and he has negotiated deals for his member labels and distributors with most of the key players in the streaming sector. As well as having access to its own stats and data, Merlin also conducts an annual survey of its members, published each summer, to gauge their opinions and thoughts on trends in the digital domain.

Tapping into both that research and his day-to-day dealings with the streaming business, Caldas spoke to CMU Business Editor Chris Cooke about the current state of play, the big debates, and his own organisation’s recent deal with Pandora and its new office Stateside.

CC: Looking at your membership survey from back in the summer, and from speaking more informally to labels of all kinds, a trend in the last couple of years seems to be that the shift from physical to digital, and downloading to streaming, is happening faster in the indie sector than in the record industry overall. Why do you think that is the case?
CCal: I’m not sure it’s all happening faster, for example the drop in download sales amongst our members seems less pronounced than in industry-wide figures. But I definitely think the independents are adapting quickly and creatively to the shifts in market dynamics, and their success over the past year – both in the overall growth of the business and at a mainstream chart level – underlines that.

It’s possible that indie labels are primarily selling to the kind of consumer who is naturally shifting faster from one model to the next. But I think the rate of growth the indies are seeing in streaming is also due to the nature of those platforms and the ways the indies use them. In physical, indies were often at a disadvantage because of barriers to entry, to getting records into high street record stores. Many of those barriers were removed by downloading, though most download stores were built to mirror the record shop experience, just with a lot more shelf space.

- See more at: http://www.completemusicupdate.com/article/qa-charles-caldas-merlin/#sthash.NzyoKSA9.dpuf

Charles Caldas runs Merlin, the agency that negotiates and administrates digital deals on behalf of a sizable slice of the independent record industry; and he has negotiated deals for his member labels and distributors with most of the key players in the streaming sector. As well as having access to its own stats and data, Merlin also conducts an annual survey of its members, published each summer, to gauge their opinions and thoughts on trends in the digital domain.

Tapping into both that research and his day-to-day dealings with the streaming business, Caldas spoke to CMU Business Editor Chris Cooke about the current state of play, the big debates, and his own organisation’s recent deal with Pandora and its new office Stateside.

CC: Looking at your membership survey from back in the summer, and from speaking more informally to labels of all kinds, a trend in the last couple of years seems to be that the shift from physical to digital, and downloading to streaming, is happening faster in the indie sector than in the record industry overall. Why do you think that is the case?
CCal: I’m not sure it’s all happening faster, for example the drop in download sales amongst our members seems less pronounced than in industry-wide figures. But I definitely think the independents are adapting quickly and creatively to the shifts in market dynamics, and their success over the past year – both in the overall growth of the business and at a mainstream chart level – underlines that.

It’s possible that indie labels are primarily selling to the kind of consumer who is naturally shifting faster from one model to the next. But I think the rate of growth the indies are seeing in streaming is also due to the nature of tho

- See more at: http://www.completemusicupdate.com/article/qa-charles-caldas-merlin/#sthash.NzyoKSA9.dpuf
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Apple Wants Us to Pay for Music All Over Again

Apple Wants Us to Pay for Music All Over Again | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

After buying Beats, Apple’s made a few recent moves that show the company may be set to change how users stream music. One of the latest moves, reported by The Verge, is that Apple is trying to convince music labels to not to renew their free music streaming licenses with Spotify. Apple’s reportedly trying to convince labels that offering up their music for free is a bad idea, and that it’s about to have a much better option.

 

And that’s a pretty easy sell these days. Ad-based streaming services don’t provide much revenue for artists, and music labels prefer that music listeners access music through a paywall.


The biggest example of this so far has come from Taylor Swift, who pulled her music off of Spotify earlier this year. According to Quartz, Swift’s move away from Spotify has encouraged Universal and Sony — which control more than half of the music market — to doubt the benefits of the freemium (ad-based) music streaming model.

 

The same article said that Sony Music CEO, Doug Morris, told Hits Daily Double that, “In general, free is death,” meaning that the music industry can’t survive if free music steaming persists.

 

If Apple can convince labels that its new service will bring the labels more revenue, then it could launch its new service with the backing of the industry (something which it appears Spotify might be losing right now).

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TuneCore Revenue Up in First Quarter

TuneCore Revenue Up in First Quarter | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
Digital distributor TuneCore's revenues rose 5 percent to $36 million in the first quarter, mirroring the slowed growth in the digital music markets of the United States and other large markets. The U.S. digital recorded music market climbed 6 percent last year while the U.K. market rose just 0.5 percent, according to IFPI figures released last week.
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The Past Year For Music Startups, The Success of Nexflix, And The Niche Side of Music Streaming - hypebot

The Past Year For Music Startups, The Success of Nexflix, And The Niche Side of Music Streaming - hypebot | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

One of the things that has troubled Spotify, and Deezer, and Rdio, and pretty much everyone, is the fact that people don't — and we've said this time and time again — people don't want 20 million songs. They want the 20 songs that they want to listen to right now, or the 20 songs that they're going to listen to and going to like. In December, news broke that SFX is relaunching Beatport as an EDM streaming service. It's still a pretty huge range, but it's much more genre specific. Then, yesterday it was announced that a service company called the Overflow that is going focus on streaming Christian music. Do you think these services provide any sort of interesting solution to this problem of going to Spotify and seeing just way too much content?


Maples: Absolutely. I think there's no doubt that a genre-specific or styles-specific service would do a lot better because they can differentiate on catalog. It's not so much that they have it or they don't. With most of these all-access, 20 million track, on demand services having a search button and a warehouse, they can differentiate on it by the way that they're able to curate, and bring the content directly to the person that cares about that.

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Four trends that will shape future of music in Africa

Four trends that will shape future of music in Africa | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
It’s clear that consumers are hungry for content they can identify with, and content that is easily accessible on various mobile platforms, writes Hennie Theron
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Downloads and streaming has taken over the music industry but it's increasingly difficult to regulate

Downloads and streaming has taken over the music industry but it's increasingly difficult to regulate | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
The time's they are a changing.
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Tips from the pros: how indie labels make the most of streaming playlists

Tips from the pros: how indie labels make the most of streaming playlists | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

Playlists are an important new currency on streaming services, from those created by fans that have picked up hundreds of thousands of followers, to the ones curated by labels, and the ones on Spotify’s homepage created by its own editorial team.

Getting songs on to popular playlists is increasingly important to labels, but there may be potential for shenanigans.

Some indie labels worry that major labels will start putting more pressure on Spotify to include more of their songs, while others note that some independent creators of popular playlists are hoping to charge money to add tracks – in the same way that some YouTube gamers have started charging developers to put their games in a video.

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Evan Komora's curator insight, April 13, 10:57 PM

 I found the article to be credible, Musically.com is a reliable source. This topic is more based on personal experience due to how new and advance it is into the industry. My personal experience with my own label "Street Poetics Entertainment" I make most of my money from online streaming sites such as Spotify, Rhapsody, and Pandora, The pro is that as long as you have an active following and active fan base, you will be succesful as and independent label. The cons are if you are just getting your name out there, putting your music on sites such as these ones is not a bad idea. But you will be over ran by bigger labels and artists. 

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Promise Of Digital Royalties For Producers, Mixers, And Engineers In New House Bill - hypebot

Promise Of Digital Royalties For Producers, Mixers, And Engineers In New House Bill - hypebot | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

The Allocation for Music Producer Act (AMP) will be presented to Congress this week with bipartisan support. The bill aims to redistribute digital royalties in a way that fairly compensates producers, mixers, and engineers. 


Previously left to their own devices when negotiating their fair share of digital royalty payouts, producers, engineers, and mixers would have a statutory right to receive royalties managed through SoundExchange under the AMP Act. The new bill will be formally introduced to Congress with representation from both sides of the aisle by Joe Crowley (D-New York) and Tom Rooney (R-Florida).

 

"Without producers and engineers, the music we enjoy every day couldn't make it from the recording studio to our radios and phones," said Rooney in a statement via Billboard. "Our bipartisan bill makes sure that hardworking studio professionals receive the royalties they earned in a fair and streamlined manner."

 

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New Music Industry Revenue Figures Show an Illusion of Stability

New Music Industry Revenue Figures Show an Illusion of Stability | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

The RIAA released its annual recorded music revenue figures for 2014 this past week.  The numbers tell the story of changes in the digital music market that have been familiar for the past few years: on-demand music services up, digital radio up, download sales down, CD sales even further down ...

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Music publishing firm Kobalt raises $60 million funding from Google, Dell

Music publishing firm Kobalt raises $60 million funding from Google, Dell | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

Founded in 2000 by its CEO Willard Ahdritz, Kobalt, which is an independent administrative publishing company-cum-label service provider, offers services to independent artists. Kobalt’s services help artists keep a track of all the royalties that get earned through streaming or usage of their songs on any site around the World Wide Web. Kobalt’s sophisticated trackers scour the payment systems around the world and determine the amount of royalties receivable by artists who have hired Kobalt for its services.

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Spotify Cannibalization Is "Absolutely Bogus," Says Resigning Universal Music Exec... - Digital Music News

Spotify Cannibalization Is "Absolutely Bogus," Says Resigning Universal Music Exec... - Digital Music News | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

 

“We’ve conducted research with four of our artists, and every single one of those bands has earned more money from its album being on Spotify than it has from being on any other services within that period of time.  Some of them haven’t inflected yet, but the trajectory – assuming zero growth on subscriber levels on any of these services – inflects within five years.”

“The argument that streaming harms records sales is absolutely bogus.“

_____________________________________

Rob Wells, president of Universal Music Group’s global digital business, in a resignation letter this week:

“With a heavy heart but an incredible sense of accomplishment and pride, I write you today to tell you that I have decided to leave my position and to explain why.  While leaving isn’t easy, I take comfort in the extraordinary digital team that I am leaving behind–who have become more than just work colleagues but a true family–and the knowledge that whatever entrepreneurial opportunity I explore next, I will always have a close relationship with everyone at Universal Music Group, both here in the US and in every territory around the world.”

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Zane Lowe Could Do More For Discovery At Apple Than Echonest’s $25.6 Million Does For Spotify - hypebot

Zane Lowe Could Do More For Discovery At Apple Than Echonest’s $25.6 Million Does For Spotify - hypebot | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it

When BBC Radio One DJ Zane Lowe announced an unexpected move to Apple, Mark Mulligan interpreted that as writing on the wall. Take a closer look at the shifts happening within the streaming service sector and what they could mean for the industry as a whole in this guest post from Music Industry Blog.


BBC Radio One DJ Zane Lowe just announced a shock move to Apple. For the non-Brits and non-Anglophiles Zane Lowe is arguably the most influential radio DJ in the UK and is renowned for being a tastemaker with an eclectic pallet. His left of centre focus and his commitment to supporting and breaking new acts has allowed Radio One the freedom to be unashamedly mainstream in much of its other output. So why does this all matter for Apple? While it is not yet clear what sort of role Lowe will assume at Cupertino it is a move bristling with significance and a clear statement of intent from Apple.

 

Fixing the Tryanny Of Choice

The Tyranny of Choice remains one of the biggest challenges for streaming services, namely how to make sense of 35 million songs. It has been challenge enough for the Aficionados at the vanguard of the first wave of subscription service adoption. It is a problem of far greater proportions for the next wave of subscribers, the later adopters who do not have the expertise nor intent to invest great effort into discovering new music. It is not as simple as ‘lean forward’ versus ‘lean back’. But instead gradations between the two. Beyond Apple’s inevitable Spotify-subscriber win back efforts, these early followers will be at the core of Apple’s streaming strategy.

Catherine Hol's insight:

"An Amazon Prime executive recently said that when commissioning shows he didn’t want hits that 80% of his audience quite liked, he wanted shows that 30% of his audience loved. That is what discovery is all about. Not being content most of the time, but being blown away some of the time." Yes, very insightful.

 

"As Eli Pariser identified in his excellent Ted Talk ‘Beware Of Filter Bubbles’ there is a risk that recommendation algorithms actually narrow our choice and limit discovery. That by continually refining recommendations based on previous taste and choice they make our world views increasingly narrow and ultimately boring. Music discovery is not simply about finding music that sounds like other music we already like. It is also about serendipitous moments of wonder when something comes at us from the left field and leaves us breathless. That is the antithesis of ‘here are three other bands like this you might like’."

 

Excellent points about music discovery.

 

 

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Spanish Recording Industry Has First Gain in Music Sales in Over a Decade

Spanish Recording Industry Has First Gain in Music Sales in Over a Decade | Music Business - What's Up? | Scoop.it
Spain has achieved its first year-over-year gain in music sales in more than a decade. In 2014, consumer spending on recorded music reached 149.9 million euros, according to a report released Tuesday (Feb. 10) by Spanish music industry association PROMUSICAE.
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