Music
1 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lety Cruz from Music to work to
Scoop.it!

How film music manipulates emotions

How film music manipulates emotions | Music | Scoop.it
Composer Neil Brand explores how the soundtrack affects our emotions in films like Psycho, The Godfather and Paranormal Activity

Via Andrew McCluskey
more...
Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, September 18, 2013 1:20 PM

Interesting piece on the tricks and tools that we composers use to convey emotions.  What's really cool is the development of infrasound - low sub human ear sound waves that have been demonstrated to cause - and I quote ".. extreme sorrow, heart palpitations and shivering" and how it's used in horror movie scores.  I'm not really sure how good that actually is - guess we'll hear more about it from the lawsuit (when it inevitably comes)

Rescooped by Lety Cruz from Music to work to
Scoop.it!

My brain was like mashed potato after a terrible car accident

My brain was like mashed potato after a terrible car accident | Music | Scoop.it
Just 17 months ago Ed Buckley, 22, from Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire woke up from a six month coma after being struck by a speeding taxi.

Via Andrew McCluskey
more...
Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, September 25, 2013 1:49 PM

Feel good music therapy post of the day - plus celebrity musicians - who could ask for anything more.  I like this article as it actually breaks down how the music therapist worked to use music to rehabilitate a former coma patient.  Add in a visit from Coldplay and you've got a story that presents music therapy in a popular as well as legitimate light.  I'm stoked for Ed Buckley - but Jessica Atkinson - the therapist - you go girl!

Rescooped by Lety Cruz from Music to work to
Scoop.it!

Music Lessons May Improve Language and Reading Skills, Study Suggests

Music Lessons May Improve Language and Reading Skills, Study Suggests | Music | Scoop.it
A new study offers the first biological evidence linking the ability to keep a beat to reading and language skills.

Via Andrew McCluskey
more...
Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, September 27, 2013 2:12 PM

Another study closing in on the relationship between music and language - basically - people who can keep a beat may be able to process language more effectively.  The thinking goes that if you have trained yourself to keep time by establishing closer connections between the auditory and motor cortexes - that understanding of rhythm benefits you when you're looking to understand the spoken word - specifically when you're learning how to read.   

The researcher reckons that increased musical training is going to benefit the acquisition of language skills.  get your kids in music class! The sample size was 124 high school students.

Rescooped by Lety Cruz from Music to work to
Scoop.it!

'Making music may improve young children's behavior'

'Making music may improve young children's behavior' | Music | Scoop.it
Making music can improve both pro-social behavior (voluntary behavior intended to benefit another) and the problem solving skills of young children according to a new study.

Via Andrew McCluskey
more...
Jack O'Dowd's curator insight, September 19, 2013 7:50 PM

I have always loved music so this is intersting... but make sure it's appropriate!

Kenneth Peterson's comment, September 20, 2013 11:49 AM
There is also a strong correlation between music and abilities in mathematics
Natasha Lambie's curator insight, September 23, 2013 9:57 AM

No surprises there.

Rescooped by Lety Cruz from Music to work to
Scoop.it!

Music Matters | A blog on music cognition: More nons(ci)ence on music listening?

Music Matters | A blog on music cognition: More nons(ci)ence on music listening? | Music | Scoop.it

Via Andrew McCluskey
more...
Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, September 26, 2013 7:09 PM

I caught this Spotify study as well and chose not to re-publish it - it just reeked of nonsense.  I did have a look for Emma Gray and couldn't find a digital footprint for her either.  Prof. Honing is absolutely right to raise here.

 

I love that all this research is bubbling up but I'm always interested in sample size and who pays the bills - so should the journalists who amplify the signal.