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Rescooped by Allie Dorrity from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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The Target Security Breach And Our Vulnerable Data | On Point Radio | WBUR.org

The Target Security Breach And Our Vulnerable Data | On Point Radio | WBUR.org | Other | Scoop.it
Target raises the number of customers who may have had debit and credit card information stolen to maybe 110 million. We'll look at the national implications.It was bad enough when the first news came from Target. Credit and debit card data on 40 million Americans, stolen at the height of the holiday shopping season. Then Friday, Target let it be known that that number was in fact as high as 110 million Americans’ data stolen, out there, at risk. A third of the country. A number that sounds like system failure. Now it’s a waiting game to see who gets ripped off. It will be a lot of people. Maybe you. What’s wrong with this system? This hour On Point: inside the Target scandal, the American way of credit card security, and your vulnerability.Click headline to read more and listen to this On Point Radio discussion--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Allie Dorrity's insight:
This is relating to me in a little bit of a way. We shopped at target only a little before this all went down. My dad told my mom about it and she started freaking out about it. It's bad enough if people don't have money and someone just takes everything you have. Also one of my dad's friends had all his money taken from him when this happened. It's just sad.
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The Youtube Music Awards: Why Artists Should Care

The Youtube Music Awards: Why Artists Should Care | Other | Scoop.it
Not everyone is thrilled about the YouTube Music Awards. Critics felt under-stimulated, even betrayed, when the inaugural online award show's nominees were announced last week.
Allie Dorrity's insight:
YouTube is having their own music awards and people don't get it. Some people are complaining about how it's the same old pop music musicians playing. I find it interesting because I agree that it's the same as any other music award ceremony.
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The music video for 65daysofstatic’s new track “PRISMS” was entirely made by a computer algorithm

The music video for 65daysofstatic’s new track “PRISMS” was entirely made by a computer algorithm | Other | Scoop.it
Matt Pearson decided to prove wrong Alex Rutterford, the director of Autechre’s “Gantz Graf“, who said back in 2002 that a computer program could not make a music video on its own. Well, more than 10 years later, this feat has become possible. Pearson only wrote the algorithm and the system made all the artistic decisions such as the camera work by itself, based on its interpretation of the audio track. Matt Pearson insists that he does not want to be labeled as a designer but rather as a coder. If he is indeed part of the design process, his work only creates the environment in which the generative animation evolves on its own. What was unthinkable ten years ago has now become a reality, so what will it be ten years from now? Algorithms creating other algorithms? Probably so. I don’t know if this perspective is exciting or terrifying.
Allie Dorrity's insight:
It's funny how people can do amazing things when they try to prove people wrong. This is a good example of that. This program made a whole music video by itself! Such as the camera work from the interpretation of the music. Cool
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Rescooped by Allie Dorrity from Amazing Science
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MIT: A faster Internet — designed by computers?

MIT: A faster Internet — designed by computers? | Other | Scoop.it
Is it possible for a computer to discover the right rules for congestion control in heterogeneous and dynamic networks? Should computers rather than humans be tasked with developing congestion control methods? And just how well can we make computers perform this task?One of TCP’s main functions is to prevent network congestion by regulating the rate at which computers send data. In the last 25 years, engineers have made steady improvements to TCP’s congestion-control algorithms, resulting in several competing versions of the protocol: Many Windows computers, for instance, run a version called Compound TCP, while Linux machines run a version called TCP Cubic.At the annual conference of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Data Communication this summer, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing will present a computer system, dubbed Remy, that automatically generates TCP congestion-control algorithms. In the researchers’ simulations, algorithms produced by Remy significantly outperformed algorithms devised by human engineers.Remy is a machine-learning system, meaning that it arrives at its output by trying lots of different possibilities, and exploring further variations on those that seem to work best. Users specify certain characteristics of the network, such as whether the bandwidth across links fluctuates or the number of users changes, and by how much. They also provide a “traffic profile” that might describe, say, the percentage of users who are browsing static Web pages or using high-bandwidth applications like videoconferencing.Finally, the user also specifies the metrics to be used to evaluate network performance. Standard metrics include throughput, which indicates the total amount of data that can be moved through the network in a fixed amount of time, and delay, which indicates the average amount of time it takes one packet of information to travel from sender to receiver. The user can also assign metrics different weights — say, reducing delay is important, but only one-third as important as increasing throughput.In tests that simulated a high-speed, wired network with consistent transmission rates across physical links, Remy’s algorithms roughly doubled network throughput when compared to Compound TCP and TCP Cubic, while reducing delay by two-thirds. In another set of tests, which simulated Verizon’s cellular data network, the gains were smaller but still significant: a 20 to 30 percent improvement in throughput, and a 25 to 40 percent reduction in delay. “I am thrilled by the approach,” says Victor Bahl, research manager of the Mobility and Networking Group at Microsoft Research. “When you can constrain the problem domain and define precisely what you want out of the protocol, I can believe that their system is better than a human.”Bahl cautions that “when the protocol has to do many things for many people or many devices, then it’s not clear whether this is the optimal method.” But he adds that it could very well be that, in the future, networked computers will adopt different congestion-control policies depending on the types of applications they’re running. “I could see that that’s where this thing would excel,” he says.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Allie Dorrity's insight:
This is especially interesting to me because I'm kind of addicted to the internet and I love fast internet. I need fast internet for gaming as well as having a whole family that uses internet at the same time. This is a must have and I'm interested in how they are doing it.
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Rescooped by Allie Dorrity from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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WillCall now lets you give the gift of concerts through its last-minute ticket-buying app

WillCall now lets you give the gift of concerts through its last-minute ticket-buying app | Other | Scoop.it
“ WillCall, the mobile app that makes it easy to find tickets to live shows at the last minute, has introduced a new feature that lets users gift concert tickets to anyone.”
Via Thomas Faltin
Allie Dorrity's insight:
Instead of fumbling to buy tickets last minute, you can use this app. You also can gift tickets to anyone. I find this interesting and I want to find out how this even works. Push ally you can't buy tickets last minute, also do you just show them your phone with the ticket on it or something?
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