Murder on the Leviathan
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Murder on the Leviathan (Erast Fandorin Mysteries, #3)

Murder on the Leviathan (Erast Fandorin Mysteries, #3) | Murder on the Leviathan | Scoop.it
Paris, 1878: Eccentric antiquarian Lord Littleby and his ten servants are found murdered in Littleby’s mansion on the rue de Grenelle, an...
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The book starts out of a reading of a police report about a murder/theft in a mansion at Rue De Grenelle. 9 servants were killed by injections and the 10th was Lord Littleby with his skull smashed in, 2 things were stolen a shawl and a golden shiva. The shiva is the concentration of the events because of the value it holds but is later thrown away and found. There was only one thing found on the scene of the crime a golden badge shaped like a whale. This badge is only given to people on aboard the Leviathan. Enter Commissioner "Papa" Gauche the policemen sent to the Leviathan to find the killer. The person who killed 10 people must have been on the boat and was missing a golden whale badge. There was only 4, two men and two women. So Gauche singled out these people into the Windsor salon(This is where most of the revelations happen in the story). The Suspects were "Sir Reginald Milford-Stokes" a crazy ginger, "M. Gintaro Aono" a Japanese imperial officer but later revealed as a doctor, "Mme. Renate Kleber" a pregnant wife of a banker, "Mlle. Clarissa Stamp" a aging englishwoman. Through out the story more people are added to this little group like the physician "M. Truffo" and his wife, a russian Diplomant "Erast Fandorin" and "Lieutenant Renier" soon to be captain and lastly a professor "Sweetchild". The story goes through many twist and turns. Half way through it was revealed that the shawl was the object of value...it led to the legendary treasure of the Diamond Rajah that matched no one else. The group helped Gauche to solve the mystery but was ultimately solved by M.Fandorin, it was at a cost though...of the lifes of Sweetchild and the Commissioner. Sweetchild(since he figured out what's been happening) and the 10 people were killed by Renier who was the heir of the Rajah fortune. The Commissioner was gunned down by Kleber who was later revealed was Marie Sanfon(thanks to the russian) a known theft and killer was working with/the wife of Renier. Before this Gauche killed Renier(Who was caught and arrested for trying to crash the boat) for the threasure. In the end the shawl was lost to the wind thanks to the Russian, when that happened Marie went after Fandorin with a knife, Aono(He owed Fandorin his life since Fandorin helped proof him innocent to Gauche) stopped her by kicking it out of her hands. She then pulled a gun and shot Aono, pointing the gun at Fandorin she says "I really do never miss," she hissed. "And I'm going to put a bullet right between those pretty eyes of yours." (221) The boat was hit by a wave and Marie was hit by the Big Ben clock. The story ends with the letter Reginald Milford-Stokes writes to his Emily.

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Civilian Ships -- Great Eastern (British Steamship, 1859)

Civilian Ships -- Great Eastern (British Steamship, 1859) | Murder on the Leviathan | Scoop.it
This page features, and provides links to, all the views we have concerning the steamship Great Eastern of 1859.
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The website begins by what the SS Great Eastern was built out of 22,500-ton (displacement) iron and its original intention was for the passenger and cargo trade between England and Ceylon. The website kept on referring to the ship as a ship for example “she was so far ahead of contemporary commercial requirements, and industrial capabilities, that her length (nearly 700 feet) and tonnage would remain unmatched for four more decades.” The boat was originally named the Leviathan during a launching attempt in November 1857. It was later named the Great Eastern but after months of trying to get it afloat it left its original owners bankrupt. The new owners decided to change the boats route to Britain to North America. The ships financial issues continued for example “insufficient capitalization restricted outfitting to luxury accommodations, thus ignoring the decidedly non-luxurious, but very profitable immigrant trade.” Also hit by a series of accidents. The time with the second company was short due to repairs costs crushing the company. When the Great Eastern reached New York on June 1860, the next couple of months it was exhibited to the public and made voyages along the U.S. coast. “Nearly a year passed before Great Eastern's next westbound trip in May 1861, by which time the American Civil War had begun. During June and July she transported troops to Quebec to reinforce Canada's defenses. In September Great Eastern began another trip to New York, but was disabled by a severe storm. In mid-1862 she made three voyages, but improving commercial prospects abruptly ceased when she struck an uncharted rock entering New York harbor, necessitating more expensive repairs. She did not resume service until mid-1863, making two more trips and bankrupting yet another company.” The rest of the website describes that the Great Eastern laid the trans-Atlantic telegraph cable. Finding its true calling The Great Eastern continued this until being sold in late 1887. The SS Great Eastern went back to Liverpool where it broke apart during 1888 and 1889.

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Evolution of the Criminal Investigation Department

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In the Article Evolution of the Criminal Investigation Department "Most scholars suggest that the first criminal investigation division was established in France". The beginning of this article discusses the early development of detective branches like Sûreté(Detective Branch) can be traced back to the innovations of François Eugène Vidocq(Famous French Detective) in the early 19th century. It goes on to describe that Sûreté was influential on the rest of Europe it was. The Second half described the development of forensic science in criminal investigation stating "The development of fingerprinting and DNA profiling revolutionized the world of criminal investigation." The one during this evolution that was very prominent was Alphonse Bertillon. He developed a methodology to identify recidivists that became known as Bertillonage. "It was based on human body measurements before the popularization of fingerprinting later in the century. In 1888 Bertillon was recognized for his contributions when he was appointed as chief of the service of judicial recordkeeping. He would eventually add photographic methods to other identification techniques and become an expert in using photography to identify forged documents." The article later discusses the development of fingerprints and their use in police work.

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The Gentle Axe (Porfiry Petrovich , #1)

The Gentle Axe (Porfiry Petrovich , #1) | Murder on the Leviathan | Scoop.it
Fresh off the case of a deranged student who murdered his landlady, noted police investigator Porfiry Petrovich barely takes a breath bef...
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Why did I choose this book? Well after reading Murder on the Leviathan I'm still in the mood for a murder mystery. Instead of being stuck on a boat and knowing it had to be one of the people in the room, it's good to see a classic look at the murder mystery genre.  

 

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Russia: Country of Origin

Russia Listeni/ˈrʌʃə/ or /ˈrʊʃə/ (Russian: Россия, tr. Rossiya; IPA: [rɐˈsʲijə] ( listen)), also officially known as the Russian Federation[7] (Russian: Российская Федерация, tr. Rossiyskaya Federatsiya; IPA: [rɐˈsʲijskəjə fʲɪdʲɪˈratsɨjə] ( listen)), is a country in northern Eurasia.[8] It is a federal semi-presidential republic, comprising 83 federal subjects. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia, and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk, and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. At 17,075,400 square kilometres (6,592,800 sq mi), Russia is the largest country in the world, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area. Russia is also the world's ninth most populous nation with 143 million people as of 2012.[3] Extending across the whole of northern Asia, Russia spans nine time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms.

The nation's history began with that of the East Slavs, who emerged as a recognizable group in Europe between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD.[9] Founded and ruled by a Varangian warrior elite and their descendants, the medieval state of Rus arose in the 9th century. In 988 it adopted Orthodox Christianity from the Byzantine Empire,[10] beginning the synthesis of Byzantine and Slavic cultures that defined Russian culture for the next millennium.[10] Rus' ultimately disintegrated into a number of smaller states; most of the Rus' lands were overrun by the Mongol invasion and became tributaries of the nomadic Golden Horde.[11] The Grand Duchy of Moscow gradually reunified the surrounding Russian principalities, achieved independence from the Golden Horde, and came to dominate the cultural and political legacy of Kievan Rus'. By the 18th century, the nation had greatly expanded through conquest, annexation, and exploration to become the Russian Empire, which was the third largest empire in history, stretching from Poland in Europe to Alaska in North America.[12][13]

Following the Russian Revolution, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic became the largest and leading constituent of the Soviet Union, the world's first constitutionally socialist state and a recognized superpower,[14] which played a decisive role in the Allied victory in World War II.[15][16] The Soviet era saw some of the most significant technological achievements of the 20th century, including the world's first human spaceflight. The Russian Federation became the successor state of the Russian SFSR following the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, and is recognized as the continuing legal personality of the All-Union state.[17]

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I used the wiki page because since I can't know for certain what you want to know. The best thing about wiki is that it's really accurate and if you need to double check it provides links for you. Lastly without opening the link you already get an extended history of the country this book is from.

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Map of Russia

Map of Russia | Murder on the Leviathan | Scoop.it
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Russia is quite the beautiful place to visit and has a interesting history that shaped the country forever. Places like Kazan which is 1000 year old capital, with it's beautiful architecture with it. Another interesting place to visit oddly enough is Lake Baikal in Siberia, which is the oldest and deepest freshwater lake on the planet.

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Boris Akunin: Author of Book

Boris Akunin: Author of Book | Murder on the Leviathan | Scoop.it
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Boris Akunin was born in Zestaponi, Georgia and since 1958 he lived in Moscow. Boris was influenced by Japanese Kabuki theatre, in which he joined the historical-philological branch of the institute df Asian and African Countries of Moscow State University as an expert on Japan. He prefers to work with historical material mixed with his stories.

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Seven Wonders of the Industrial World: The Great Ship

عجائب الدنيا السبع الصناعية 1 : السفينة العظيمة - Industrial Wonders : The Great Ship هذه هي القصة الحقيقية لأعظم سفينة شهدها العالم. "جريت ايسترن" سفينةٌ أف...
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The episode begins with narration and images of people working on the ISambard Kingdom Brunels SS Great Eastern showing the people involved and that this is the ship that'll financially ruin them. They call it the floating city, flash to The Eastern Steam Navigation Company discussing the financial side of things saying how Brunel doesn't care about the money just the fame. Finally they came to have a contract with Brunel. But a short time of working a fire hit them destroying everything about the boat plans, etc. They had no insurance but Russel the main provider choose to keep the dept that was pilling up from Brunel. To build the boat people had to work around the clock, they used children to get into smaller spaces. Many things happen between Russel and Brunel it is rumored that Russel was selling iron for the ship to pay off his debts later production stopped completely. Soon production starts up again Brunel will not let this project die. Even if the workers do, they're were several recorded accidents during the production of the Great Eastern. It was complete later it was all ready to go thats when the name was shortly named the Leviathan but the launch failed with the chains holding the ship broke killing workers in the crowd. More than 19 days later the ship finally hit the shore and there Brunel saw his Great Eastern float. Later it Brunel had a stroke that left him paralyzed so Russel had to take the trip for the Great Eastern but later Brunel died. The Great Eastern took many trips bu tin 1889 wreches took apart the ship.

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Speed and continuity in short supply

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The article talks about how communication and the connection between people of the world would start in an unexpected place “tiny Val-entia Island seems an unlikely setting for a 140-year-old communications revolution, particularly in light of 21st-century Ireland's poor transport links and patchy internet access.” How this happened was in July 13th, 1866 Isambard Kingdom Brunel boat the SS Great Eastern set sail to Canada, as the article puts it “a voyage that helped shape the modern world.” The ship “one of the Industrial Revolutions Leviathans” took two weeks and used 2,000 miles of cable through Trinity bay, and Newfoundland. It completed the first viable telegraph link between Europe and America. It was a very event connecting these worlds that were thought to be so far apart, now seemed so close together.

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Forensic Science

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The Website begins with Alphonse Bertillons father telling us how "the distinguished Paris physician, statistician, and anthropologist, wasn’t sure what to do about his grown son Alphonse.” It went on to say that he had nothing to worry about since “He had served honorably as a clerk in the French Army, dressed well, shared his father’s interest in statistics and anthropology, and had inherited his father’s intelligence.” After his father gave him a job as an assistant clerk in the criminal records office of the Paris Police Department, Bertillon noticed that there was no organized filling system. He was only at the job a couple of days when he began to think of better ways to organized soon developed Bertillonage. By 1889, ten years after he had joined the records office as a lowly clerk, Bertillon was a celebrity in France and known in law enforcement circles throughout the world. That year he published some impressive figures of 3l,849 arrestees measured during the life of his system, 615 were found to be repeat offenders, many of whom were wanted at the time for other crimes. His system of criminal identification worked, and he could prove it.

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