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Why SLESL?

A brief explanation of why many educators and students are going into virtual worlds for to learn English
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Critical Hits & Critical Spaces: The potential of Roleplaying Games in Developing Critical Literacy and New Literacy Practices

Critical Hits & Critical Spaces: The potential of Roleplaying Games in Developing Critical Literacy and New Literacy Practices | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
By Kevin Smith in Cultural Studies and Curriculum Design.
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

In Roleplaying Games (RPGs), players perform characters in a game-world based on fictional or non-fictional elements. This type of playful performance can provide meaningful opportunities for players to examine and critique varios texts and the narrative and tropes that contain. More important, they have the pòtential to aid players in developing their critical literacy, which in return can inform their understanding of the world and provide new opportunities for social action that may bring about positive social change in their inmediate circustances and beyond.

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Learning2gether with EVO Minecraft MOOC and Gamification of Teacher P…

This presentation is about a correspondence between two EVO (Electronic Village Online) sessions: 1) the EVO Minecraft MOOC (EVOMC16) and 2) Techno-CLIL (conte…
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Shaping the Way We Teach English Webinars | American English

Shaping the Way We Teach English Webinars | American English | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
This professional development program for English teachers includes recordings from previous webinars, corresponding downloadable presentations and additional resources.
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

The Shaping the Way We Teach English Webinar Course is hosted by the U.S. Department of State’s Office of English Language Programs in the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. This professional development program for English teachers around the globe addresses methodological topics that foster interactive, student-centered language instruction. Here you will find recordings from previous webinars that are 60-90 minutes and include corresponding downloadable presentations and additional resources. - See more at: http://americanenglish.state.gov/resources/shaping-way-we-teach-english-webinars#sthash.07fOJ11w.dpuf

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EVO Minecraft MOOC Week 1 and 2

EVO Minecraft MOOC Week 1 and 2 | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
EVO MC MOOC follows Dave Cormier’s 5 steps to success in MOOCs.

Orient
Declare
Network
Cluster
Focus
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

This is Rose Bard's blog. She's a co-moderator of #evomc16 

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Using Minecraft for Learning English

Using Minecraft for Learning English | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
Minecraft is a game known since its inception in 2009 to have occupied both children and adults in hours of enjoyable play with creative thinking. It has grabbed inordinate attention from educators in a plethora of blog posts, YouTube videos and podcasts too numerous to mention (just Google Minecraft and whatever subject or aspect of education you are interested in). It’s a game that is unique in that it’s not player vs. world or player vs. others but “player vs. creativity,” according to Australian educator Dean Groom (2011), who goes on to say that Minecraft’s refreshing lack of agenda allows him to set the game up for his classes in ways that he feels will support his curriculum. As guest on another podcast show (Allison, 2011 ) he says that the curriculum is addressed not so much in the game but what goes on around the game, in discussion and follow up outside the game. He says what he likes about Minecraft is that it can be whatever a learner wants it to be. He can set the game in the way he needs to in order to direct learners toward goals to be accomplished, unlike with other games that are not so flexible. This point is not lost on homeschoolers, some of whom are blogging about how they find that when they let their children play Minecraft the student learners develop both academic and life skills through pursuing their curiosity in enjoyable discovery learning more persistently than they would if faced with prescriptive worksheets (Conaway, 2012; Coyle, 2012).
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

Joel Levin, a.k.a. Minecraft Teacher (http://minecraftteacher.tumblr.com/) mirrors Groom’s approach to using Minecraft in his own classes. He says that Minecraft works so well because unlike with most games, where you craft a lesson to match the game, with Minecraft, he decides what he wants to teach, and shapes the game around that. In fact, in Minecraft, since players can set their own goals, Levin has to ‘limit’ the game by restricting resources, setting puzzles, and making it necessary for his students to collaborate. One of his videos (Levin, 2011) shows how he sets up such environments for kids, in this case tasking them to explore a desert to look for pyramids and expose archaeological treasures he’s concealed within.

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Emoting With Emoji - Science Friday

Emoting With Emoji - Science Friday | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
A look at what the rise of emoji says about online communication.
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

Emoji—the tiny and typically adorable pictographs that increasingly accent our online communication—were first created in Japan in 1999. Emoji became a part of Unicode, which sets a computing standard for text, in 2010. After that, operating systems like Apple’s iOS and Android introduced emoji keyboards in 2011 and 2013, respectively. (Apple also introduced ethnically diverse emoji in April of this year as part of its iOS 8.3.) Since then, tear-shedding smiley faces, fried shrimp, and syringes (for example) have increasingly popped up in texts and tweets. And earlier this month, Thomas Dimson, a software engineer at Instagram, shared findings that around 40 percent of text on that social media platform contains emoji. Dimson, along with linguist Tyler Schnoebelen and interactive designer Ana Becker, discuss how emoji shape the way we communicate online.

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Virtual-Reality Lab Explores New Kinds of Immersive Learning – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Virtual-Reality Lab Explores New Kinds of Immersive Learning – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
Mr. Varshney is researching how the human brain processes information in immersive environments, and how that’s different than on a computer monitor. In classrooms, he thinks virtual reality will help students immerse themselves in the subjects they’re learning about. One day, he said, architecture students could use the technology to walk through buildings they design.

“Instead of looking at just the equations,” he said, “you could explore.”
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

Virtual-reality technology is still young, and headsets like Oculus Rift are cumbersome. So far they aren’t being used on a mass scale. But eventually the researchers hope their work will be used in hospitals, grocery stores, and classrooms. Mr. Varshney doesn’t know how long that will take. “Right now the head-mounted displays are very big and bulky,” he said, “but remember how cellphones evolved.”

Smartphones took about 20 years to become powerful, he said, and he expects virtual-reality technology will follow a similar timeline. But he could also see them evolving faster. “There’s a certain amount of emotional appeal — experiential appeal — that this has that smartphones don’t,” he said.

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Google Virtual-Reality System Aims to Enliven Education

Google Virtual-Reality System Aims to Enliven Education | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
As part of the program, Hector Camacho, a 12th-grade economics teacher at Saint Francis High School, a private Catholic school in Mountain View, Calif., created a “Great Recession Tour” of Manhattan. It takes students to the former headquarters of Lehman Brothers and the offices of Goldman Sachs and federal regulators involved in the fiscal crisis of 2007-8.

Mr. Camacho said he could have easily done a PowerPoint presentation on the topic for students. But he said he wanted to visually immerse his class in places that played important roles in the crisis to give them a more concrete feel for the potential impact of fiscal and monetary policies. He added that he saw Expeditions as a supplemental teaching tool to be used occasionally with students.

“It’s just another way to convey to them that there are real-world consequences” to corporate and government actions, he said.
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

So far, in collaboration with teachers, Google has developed about 100 trips — including virtual visits to the Great Wall of China, Independence Hall in Philadelphia and El Capitan, a rock formation in Yosemite National Park — that have been tried out by math, science, social studies, language and other classes. The company has larger ambitions to use Expeditions as a tool to take students on simulated tours of colleges or to help them explore career options by virtually shadowing veterinarians and other professionals throughout their work days.

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Becoming little scientits: technologically-enhanced project based language learning.pdf

Melinda Dooly, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Randall Sadler, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


This article outlines research into innovative language teaching practices that make optimal use of technology and Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) for an integrated approach to Project-Based Learning. It is based on data compiled during a 10-
week language project that employed videoconferencing and machinima (short video clips featuring virtual world avatars) to introduce young language learners (7 to 8 years old) to
concepts of good and bad habits related to personal hygiene, physical activities, and eating. Within the Project-Based Language Learning approach (PBLL), the students gained new information about the topic under study, and this information was then used to
communicate face-to-face (with classmates) and online (with telecollaborative partners) in the target language of English in order to resolve problems related to the topic. The
authors provide a detailed overview of the project workflow as part of a qualitative study into the efficacy of the proposed pedagogical framework.


Keywords: Collaborative Learning, Computer-Mediated Communication, Language Teaching Methodology, Second Language Acquisition, Task-Based Instruction

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Celly for Schools Setup Guide

Celly for Schools Setup Guide | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
What is Celly? Celly is a platform for ad-hoc social networks that is accessible via iPhone, Android, Web, SMS text and even email. Our emergent networks connect individuals and communities for instant and easy communication. With Celly, educators can exchange group messages, send quizzes, and create school wide alerts. 


Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

These are some ways to use it with your classes:

Moderated Group Messaging: Use Celly's moderation tools to facilitate in or out of class group discussion. Choose which messages are sent to the entire group or reply individually.Scheduled Messages: Set scheduled reminders and announcements to be automatically sent at a later date and time.Polling: Conduct instant polls with your class; use for pop quizzes, trivia, classroom assessment, and gathering feedback from students, parents, and staff. Teacher-Parent communication: Parents can easily join class groups and communicate with teachers directly over Celly without having to exchange personal information. Homework Help: Answer homework questions; send study tips and motivational messages. If a student is going to be out sick or late to class they can notify you via your Celly username. Team building and Group Projects: Students can create their own cells and use them for group projects. Teachers can join each group and monitor interactions and teamwork.Field Trips: Keep everyone on the field trip connected and in communication using group messaging. Parents can easily join field trip cells and stay informed.Sports Teams, Bands, and Clubs: Create cells for your HS sports teams, marching bands, and extracurricular clubs. Plan gatherings, send practice times, schedule changes, post-game highlights, and so on.Multi-School Groups: Entire schools and districts can chain together multiple cells to form larger messaging networks. Administrators and principals can send one message to all connected cells. Note Taking: Students can store notes on Celly via SMS text or from the Celly website and schedule their own personal reminders. Each account has its own personal notes cell. Notes can be archived and retrieved at any time. 
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3 nondigital ways to get connected

3 nondigital ways to get connected | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
Many people assume that being a connected educator is all about jumping on the computer and staring at a screen for hours on end. Engaging with educators through Twitter, blogs and other forms of social media is one way to connect, but it is not the only way.

Sometimes it helps to use the old-fashioned method of building a professional learning network before you start connecting digitally. Here are some tips for making analog connections as well:
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

Start reaching out to other educators in your own building and talk shop.


Conferences provide a huge opportunity to connect with like-minded educators and initiate meaningful conversations.


Building relationships with other schools can also help bring together students from different backgrounds to collaborate on projects and create a larger learning community that benefits students as well as educators.


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Infographic: How to become a connected educator

Infographic: How to become a connected educator | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
Reaching beyond school walls opens up a world of vibrant learning communities in which educators share ideas and propel each other to grow.
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

Are you a connected educator? no? what are you waiting for? Connect to communities of educators around the world... you won't regret it..!

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Video: Why Is Measuring Learning So Difficult?

Video: Why Is Measuring Learning So Difficult? | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
From analytics to teaching and learning, several higher ed professionals weigh in on the challenge of attempting to measure comprehension.
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

"Learning is one of the most multi-dimencional thing out there...the problem is that we have to simplify it too much in order to capture data or to capture understandings of it that we can use"... Amy Collier.

 

Daniel Hickey .. "when you engage meaningfully in social practices and you are able to participate more successfully... you can't measure that... learning is too contextual, too idiosyncratic.. the knowledge so bound to the context words used that you can't measure it in a psychometricaly meaningful way.."

 

"Learning is one of the most personal thing we do..nobody can do learning to us.. if we are not presented with conditions or motivations to actually attend to what's going on take it in and start thinking about it the idea of having learned something.. it is not going to happen. The constructive learning as a cultural construct is really difficult to define and measure if you're looking at particular behavioral patterns or outputs I think we can make it measured those types of things. can get you inside my head and say you have change it?.. I'd rather doubt it...but you can watch how my behavior as a result of our interaction .. you absolutely can..."  Ellen Wagner

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Making a board game

Assignment for Week 3 of the Moodle for Teachers course during EVO 2016 - TEFL2YL Link to the free online course: https://moodle4teachers.org/course/view.php?…
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Storytelling & digital tools

An online talk delivered for EVOCLIL2016 on February 4 2016 Recording at https://live.wiziq.com/aliveext/recording.aspx?VIFBJLbQddIjqMcqjyQ2FMMcnDlE3h1s9bPlKE…
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Free Online Connecting Online For Instruction And Learning'S Tutorials

Free Online Connecting Online For Instruction And Learning'S Tutorials | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

Excellent resource.. a bank of content knowledge and great educators. Dr. Nellie and her friends..

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Minecraft Basics

A short intro to the game and possibilities of Minecraft.
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Write Your Name in Binary Code

Write Your Name in Binary Code | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
Write Your Name in Binary Code
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:
01001000 01100101 01101100 01101100 01101111 00100001

Those ones and zeros might not look like anything to you, but in binary code the numbers are actually saying “Hello!”

 

Any code that uses just two symbols to represent information is considered binary code. Different versions of binary code have been around for centuries, and have been used in a variety of contexts. For example, Braille uses raised and un-raised bumps to convey information to the blind, Morse code uses long and short signals to transmit information, and the example above uses sets of 0s and 1s to represent letters. Perhaps the most common use for binary nowadays is in computers: binary code is the way that most computers and computerized devices ultimately send, receive, and store information.

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Virtual Reality and Education in 2016 | The Edvocate

Virtual Reality and Education in 2016 | The Edvocate | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it

The Edvocate is pleased to publish this guest post on virtual reality and education as way to fuel important conversations surrounding P-20 education in America.

Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

Let us, rather, explore what virtual reality can do. One of the most common uses is virtual travel around the globe or to places not ordinarily feasible, in terms of a physical visit—via, for example, Google Expeditions. Recently, students at University of Maryland were immersed in a virtual classroom experience in order to test out a potential distance platform that simulates what it’s like to be in an actual college classroom, potentially allowing online students to have a more immersive, authentic-feeling experience. “You want the instructor to feel as if they’re right in front of you,” said Ramani Duraiswami, a computer-science professor and co-founder of the startup company VisiSonics. They showcased the technology recently at the university’s virtual-reality lab, called The Augmentarium. There’s a similar set up at Rutgers University with the use of Second Life to immerse students into a virtual reality with their classmates that is potentially more motivating than typical online interaction using instant messaging platforms.

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Expeditions: Take your students to places a school bus can't

Teachers can take their students on virtual field trips with Expeditions. For more information, visit google.com/edu/expeditions
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Action research: Irish in a 3D world: Engaging primary school children.pdf

IRISH IN A 3D WORLD: ENGAGING PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN

 

Gene Dalton, Trinity College Dublin Ann Devitt, Trinity College Dublin

 

While the majority of people in Ireland speak English as a first language, the minority Irish language is spoken daily by approximately 3% of the population even though is a compulsory subject in Irish schools. Recent research has shown the language to be in crisis, with consistently declining standards of attainment in schools. This paper presents the first cycle of an Action Research project aiming to assess the potential of using a threedimensional virtual environment (3DVE) as a platform for task-based learning of Irish in the primary school. The action phase of the cycle consisted of an intensive pilot of a language learning intervention using a 3DVE (n=25 children aged 9-10 years). The reflection component was multiphase, involving analysis of pilot outputs, re-evaluation of the literature and an in-depth user consultation (n=15 children aged 10-11 years), inspired by Student Voice methodology. The user consultation findings indicated goal orientation as the primary driver for children learning in a 3DVE with social connectivity understood as a given in any such environment. This paper offers a novel classification of games and virtual worlds for language learning which serves to integrate the two research literatures in a meaningful way. Language(s) Learned in this study: Irish

 

Keywords: Action Research, Computer-Assisted Language Learning, Virtual Environments, Game-Based Practice, Minority Languages.

Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

As the participants were minors, Open Sim was chosen as the virtual world platform. The Sim on a Stick version enabled the development of a private, secure virtual world which could be configured for access by multiple users

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, February 2, 8:50 PM

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Language Learning & Technology. Special Issue on Digital Literacies and Language Learning

Language Learning & Technology. Special Issue on Digital Literacies and Language Learning | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it

Volume 20 Number 1 (February 2016) Special Issue on Digital Literacies and Language Learning
Full Issue PDF

Dr. Doris Molero's insight:
Articles

Becoming Little Scientists: Technologically-Enhanced Project-Based Language Learning
Abstract | Article PDF
Melinda Dooly, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Randall Sadler, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
pp. 54–78

Effects of Web-Based Collaborative Writing on Individual L2 Writing Development
Abstract | Article PDF 
Dawn Bikowski, Ohio University
Ramyadarshanie Vithanage, Ohio University
pp. 79–99

Type and Amount of Input-Based Practice in CALI: The Revelations of a Triangulated Research Design 
Abstract | Article PDF
Luis Cerezo, American University
pp. 100–123

Language Learning Through Social Networks: Perceptions and Reality
Abstract | Article PDF
Chin-Hsi Lin, Michigan State University
Mark Warschauer, University of California, Irvine
Robert Blake, University of California, Davis 
pp. 124–147

The Effects of Item Preview on Video-Based Multiple-Choice Listening Assessments 
Abstract | Article PDF
Dennis Koyama, New York University
Angela Sun, Stanford University
Gary J. Ockey, Iowa State University 
pp. 148–165

Twitter-Based EFL Pronunciation Instruction
Abstract | Article PDF
José Antonio Mompean, University of Murcia 
Jonás Fouz-González, UCAM University 
pp. 166–190

Learning to Express Gratitude in Mandarin Chinese Through Web-Based Instruction
Abstract | Article PDF
Li Yang, Kansas State University 
pp. 191–208

Concordancers and Dictionaries as Problem-Solving Tools for ESL Academic Writing
Abstract | Article PDF 
Choongil Yoon, Ewha Womans University 
pp. 209–229

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Educator Competencies for personalized learner centered teaching .pdf

As college- and career-ready standards become a reality across the nation, educators and system leaders are increasingly exploring new models of teaching and learning that are more responsive to the needs of all students in our elementary and secondary schools. Known as learner-centered, studentcentered, or personalized learning these approaches require a rethinking of the teaching and learning practices that have predominated public school instruction.

Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

Gone is the default image of a teacher—an adult lecturing to students seated neatly in rows, assigning the same textbook pages to everyone, and administering the same quiz on the same day to the entire class, with the expectation of a “normal distribution” of achievement along a bell curve. Instead, teachers in personalized, learner-centered settings are called upon to assess and address individual student needs and help all reach rigorous proficiency standards. These educators promote collaborative work among groups of students; integrate learning experiences that occur outside the classroom; and, above all, foster learner independence and student voice and choice, or student agency. Achieving this ambitious vision is only possible with significant changes in the very role of the educator and the ways in which educators interact with students, peers, and the broader community

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19 education Twitter chats worth your time

19 education Twitter chats worth your time | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
For educators who thrive on connections, Twitter chats may be the perfect form of professional development. They're free. They focus on just the topic you need. They happen regularly. And they give you access to an instant community, complete with networking opportunities, emotional support and the chance to give back. Participating in chats even aligns with the ISTE Standards for Teachers because it supports professional growth and leadership while giving educators the chance to model digital citizenship.
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Why Social Networks enable and enhance greater communication in classrooms and promote learning

Why Social Networks enable and enhance greater communication in classrooms and promote learning | Mundos Virtuales, Educacion Conectada y Aprendizaje de Lenguas | Scoop.it
As an educator, we find that reliance on a variety of forms of social media is increasing and in this article I talk about why it enables greater communication
Dr. Doris Molero's insight:

As an educator, I find that reliance on a variety of forms of social media is increasing because of what social media enables to occur both inside the traditional learning environment as well as beyond the classroom setting. When integrated into the classroom, in a responsible and appropriate manner, social media can serve to enhance learning opportunities to both teachers and students. The ability to locate resources in an instant, to connect and collaborate with people from around the world to expand global experiences, and to broaden one’s skills with technology can all come about through the integration of simply one social media tool.

 

image: http://blog.visme.co/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Captura-de-pantalla-2015-07-21-a-las-6.56.16-p.m..png

 


Read more at http://blog.visme.co/why-social-networks-enable-and-enhance-greater-communication-in-classrooms-and-promote-learning/#HPgcLdlCwhRbFova.99

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