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UN: UN Member States speak out on global issues at General Assembly debate

UN: UN Member States speak out on global issues at General Assembly debate | Multilateral aid | Scoop.it
From climate change and sustainable development to the importance of multilateralism and the need for an end to impunity for war crimes and human rights, officials from United Nations Member States around the world have taken to the podium during...

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Voiceless in the south: we are cut off from shaping our own future

Voiceless in the south: we are cut off from shaping our own future | Multilateral aid | Scoop.it
Tamara Bugembe: Without reliable internet access, development professionals in the south have no voice.
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“Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things.” – Peter F. Drucker

“Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things.” – Peter F. Drucker | Multilateral aid | Scoop.it
A special collection on inspirational and motivational quotes. (Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things. - Peter F.
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Research shows Twitter could be a tool for aid workers during ...

Research shows Twitter could be a tool for aid workers during ... | Multilateral aid | Scoop.it
A group of Harvard researchers who looked at information flows on Twitter during the Boston bombings came to the conclusion the network could be useful during such events for aid workers and emergency personnel.
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What To Expect In Doha: Expect no change in U.S. commitment to the U.N. Framework

What To Expect In Doha: Expect no change in U.S. commitment to the U.N. Framework | Multilateral aid | Scoop.it
by Rebecca Lefton and Andrew Light The next high-level gathering of parties to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change started this week in Doha, Qatar, and will continue until December 7.

 

What to watch for in Doha The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change talks in Doha will continue the progress made to date toward advancing a series of tracks toward a comprehensive international climate agreement.

 

The biggest items on the three primary tracks of the Doha agenda are:

 

The closing of the Ad-hoc Working Group on Long-term Cooperative Action

 

Agreement on a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol Advancement of a work plan for the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action

 

Closing of the Ad-hoc Working Group on Long-term Cooperative Action

 

During the 2011 climate talks in Durban, South Africa, parties to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change agreed that the Long-term Cooperative Action should conclude in Doha.

 

While some of these reductions are attributable to the shift to generating more electricity from natural gas, the Obama administration’s policies are effectively reducing greenhouse gases.

 

Even assuming that Congress is not willing to move forward on progressive climate action, the Obama administration will continue to address global warming using executive authority and rulemaking under the Clean Air Act, including the development of rules for new power plants.

 

The 1997 Byrd-Hagel Resolution said the U.S. Senate would not consider a climate treaty that divided the world between the responsibilities of developed and developing countries.

 

The U.S. position has been to not oppose common-but-differentiated responsibilities as such, but instead to insist that they do not mean there are only two groups of countries in the world with radically different sets of responsibilities.

 

In this respect, then, we expect no change in U.S. commitment to the U.N. Framework

 

Convention on Climate Change process and multilateral bottom-up efforts such as enhanced action through the G20 and the U.S.-led Climate and Clean Air Coalition, which brings together states, the private sector, and NGOs to address short-lived climate pollutants such as methane, hyrdofluorocarbons, and black carbon, which are all more powerful than carbon dioxide.

 

That’s why, as a complement to the U.N. climate change process, the Center for American Progress embraces a “multiple multilateralism” approach—a slate of multilateral agreements that can close the gap between anticipated unilateral mitigation commitments by parties until 2020 and reductions in greenhouse gases needed to put us on a pathway to climate safety by the end of the century.

 

List of Webcasts At Doha here - http://unfccc4.meta-fusion.com/kongresse/cop18/templ/ovw_onDemand.php?id_kongressmain=231


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Multilateral trade in limbo - Jamaica Gleaner

Multilateral trade in limbo - Jamaica Gleaner | Multilateral aid | Scoop.it
Jamaica Gleaner Multilateral trade in limbo Jamaica Gleaner Launched with much optimism in Qatar in November 2001, the round had as a fundamental objective, achieving economic growth in developing countries through a process of multilateral trade...
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Can Conservatives Reconcile with the United Nations? - Foreign Policy (blog)

Can Conservatives Reconcile with the United Nations? - Foreign Policy (blog) | Multilateral aid | Scoop.it
Can Conservatives Reconcile with the United Nations?
Foreign Policy (blog)
Conservatives also feel that the U.S.
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Multilateral Development Cooperation in a Changing Global Order | Hany Besada | Shannon Kindornay | Palgrave Macmillan

Multilateral Development Cooperation in a Changing Global Order | Hany Besada | Shannon Kindornay | Palgrave Macmillan | Multilateral aid | Scoop.it
This volume addresses the changing nature of the international aid system and the challenges it poses for the multilateral system, donors and aid recipients, centring on new regional and national relationships developing in the multilateral system,...
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