Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry
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Survey: 80 percent of smartphone users want to interact with doctors on mobile devices | mobihealthnews

Survey: 80 percent of smartphone users want to interact with doctors on mobile devices | mobihealthnews | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

Eighty percent of smartphone users are interested in using their smartphones to interact with health care providers, according to a FICO survey of 2,239 adult smartphone users from the UK, Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, and the United States.

The survey analyzed how consumers prefer to interact with health care providers on mobile devices, online and in-person.


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Now that depends on what they mean by "interact", are they meaning consultation with their HCP or accessing test results and repeat prescriptions.

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Six reasons digital health is coming of age

Digital healthcare, a discipline with enormous potential to dramatically improve healthcare and healthcare delivery as we know it, is no longer an experiment or a novelty. It is a budding industry attracting not only major new players and consumers but, most important, investors – the key to ongoing adoption and growth.Even five years ago—a relative blink of an eye in historical terms—this would not have been true. Venture capital investing in digital healthcare in 2011 totaled less than $1 billion. Two years later, it more than doubled, to $1.9 billion – better, yes, but still modest. Then along came 2014, when funding more than doubled again, to $4.3 billion, followed by yet another record—$4.5 billion—in 2015, according to investment tracker Rock Health.
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Kamilah Howard's curator insight, April 19, 12:57 PM
Everything is digital.
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Study: Twitter Data Could Supplement Hospital Quality Surveys

Study: Twitter Data Could Supplement Hospital Quality Surveys | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it
A study by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital finds patients' tweets could be used to supplement hospital quality improvement surveys. Although the researchers found no direct relationship between the tweets and quality improvement surveys, they say the Twitter data capture patient sentiments in an unsolicited way and provide a broader view than surveys. FierceHealthcare, BMJ Quality & Safety.

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I would suggest that patients are likely to be honest on social media than in a survey

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Injected electronics: The next wave of wearable tech?

Injected electronics: The next wave of wearable tech? | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

Forget Google Glass and that Fitbit you used to wear; the ultimate in wearable computing isn't worn on your body, but embedded within it. With chips physically inserted into your body either attached to nerves or placed into muscles or skin, a new form of synergy between human and computer can occur


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I like to think I'm ahead of the curve but not sure I'll be first to sign up to imbedded chips!

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Antonio Pastor Serrano's curator insight, September 6, 2015 6:27 AM

Las nuevas tecnologías son una maravilla, pero al paso que vamos, nos vamos a robotizar.

Ya mismo, buscaremos comernos un tomate natural, cómo si fuera el mejor manjar del mundo, que lo será....

The Doctor Weighs In's curator insight, September 6, 2015 1:01 PM

Blurring the line....

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The ROI of Social Media in Healthcare - MedCity News

The ROI of Social Media in Healthcare - MedCity News | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

There has never been a more misleading term in business than social media.Healthcare executives have been trained to ask for the ROI of everything, but for some reason they put more focus on this when it comes to social than other traditional forms of media and advertising. Hospitals and health systems aren’t selling mugs or t-shirts so tracing direct business back to social can be tricky. With social marketing this conversation is a little complicated and requires some patience to understand the true return on investment. Confusion has been added by so called “marketing gurus” who have pulled the wool over business owners eyes, having them focus on likes, followers, retweets, and other impressions that simply don’t matter for business. The real value of social is the ability to provide value to your audience and tell the story of what your business does and why you are passionate about it. This creates long-term customers who remain interested in being your consumer for life.


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Stéphanie Chevrel's curator insight, August 19, 2015 3:07 AM

The real value of social media is the ability to provide value to your audience.

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AstraZeneca and Vida Health launch new app for heart attack recovery

AstraZeneca and Vida Health launch new app for heart attack recovery | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it
The live digital coaching program is designed to take patients from bedside to treadmill and beyond.

Vida Health and AstraZeneca have teamed up to launch a new app for recovering heart attack patients that should help people recover faster from and better cope with the trauma associated with such life-threatening experiences.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. Every year, about 735,000 Americans have a heart attack, and more than a quarter of those patients suffer from repeat attacks, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Heart disease is caused by several hereditary and lifestyle factors, and recovery from the first attack requires ongoing support to help prevent a second one. That’s where Vida Health and AstraZeneca’s Day-By-Day app comes into play.

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Mango Health uses Google Fit to add activity, blood pressure, weight tracking s

Mango Health uses Google Fit to add activity, blood pressure, weight tracking s | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it
Gamified medication adherence app maker Mango Health is moving beyond medications, using a new Google Fit integration to add tracking of blood pressure and weight, as well as activity tracking, into its app, the company announced today.

“From a patient or consumer’s perspective in the app, it leverages the existing paradigm around reminders, which we think is a very effective way to begin encouraging patient populations in other forms of even more proactive health,” CEO Jason Oberfest told MobiHealthNews. “So whether it’s recording blood pressure regularly, or moving regularly, monitoring glucose regularly, whatever the case may be, it was a very logical extension for the app.”

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Why Digital Health Has Not (Yet) Transformed Pharmaceutical Drug Development

Why Digital Health Has Not (Yet) Transformed Pharmaceutical Drug Development | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

For the last several years, I’ve been arguing that digital health provides an important opportunity to improve drug development, for several reasons.

First, by providing greater insight into the patient’s actual experience of disease, these technologies can reveal important differentiating features of new therapeutics, or point out aspects of illness that new medicines ought to attack.

 

Second, by offering a richer readout of phenotype, digital health measurements can reveal important disease subgroups, perhaps defined by a unique underlying mechanism that can be targeted.  I’ve discussed this in detail recently, and won’t focus on this again here.

Digital health technologies can of course be helpful in a range of other ways, such as improving adherence, population analytics, clinical decision support, etc.

 

While some have hailed the adoption of digital health by pharma, that’s not my impression, at least on the R&D side.  In my view, it remains very much on the “innovation initiative” side of things, rather than a clear business need (like pharmacology); drug development companies may be dipping their toes in and celebrating their bravery, but at best they are interested – certainly not what I’d call “pig committed.”


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Medical apps for the Android Wear smartwatch

Medical apps for the Android Wear smartwatch | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

Android Wear — which had nearly a year’s head start in front of Apple Watch — touts avariety of healthcare apps and more on Google Play that make the platform even more handy for your day-to-day life.

In fact, any Android app that uses Android notifications will pop up automatically on Android. This makes it quite handy, for instance, to follow medical Twitter feeds, get alerts from colleagues, and send emails and text messages to them.

 

My experience over the past year with my Samsung Gear Live watch has been very positive. I’ve been able to manage flights, scheduling, messaging, and more from my wrist — and even get some advice from Johns Hopkins’ @PsychPearls and follow live thoracic surgeries at UC Davis. Even Evernote is available to capture, display, and search notes on Android Wear.


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Following the Social Media Rules for Pharma and Medical Device Companies

Following the Social Media Rules for Pharma and Medical Device Companies | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

"To tweet or not to tweet?" is often the question for pharmaceutical and medical device companies when it comes to advertising their products in the burgeoning social media environment.

The very specific rules the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has regarding marketing for drugs and devices makes it difficult to market products on platforms like Twitter, Facebook and blogs. Counsel representing these companies should be familiar with several interpretive guidance documents the FDA released last year that help explain the agency's thinking as it grapples with emerging and future social media platforms. The issuance of guidance on social media was required by the 2012 "Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act" (FDASIA), Section 1121. This required the FDA to, by August 2014, "issue guidance that describes FDA policy regarding the promotion, using the Internet (including social media), of medical products that are regulated by [the FDA]." The FDA complied and issued three sets of guidance related to social media in 2014, with two more still pending. Though these guidance documents are not regulations, they represent the FDA's current thinking and best practice is to follow and comply with them.

Spatially Challenged

One of the guidance documents addresses social media platforms with limited character spacing. The most common example of such a platform is Twitter, which is limited to 140 characters for a single tweet. The FDA guidance says that if an "accurate and balanced" presentation of both risks and benefits is not possible within the constraints of the specific platform, the company should reconsider using that platform. In other words, if a company cannot present both the benefits and the warnings and risks about a product in the space provided, it should not advertise it there.

The FDA rules on labeling govern how a company is allowed to market its product. The agency requires company advertising to meet several requirements: be truthful and non-misleading (FD&C Act 502(a), 201(n)); include certain information, such as the indicated use and risks (21 CFR 201.100(d), 201.105(d), 801.109(d)); be prominently placed on the label; and any advertisement that makes representations about drugs must include certain risk information (502(n), 21 CFR 202.1). Advertising on social media must be presented in a fair and balanced way.

Handling Misinformation

Most of us are familiar with Internet "trolls," those sometimes angry and often misinformed commenters to online articles or blog posts. What happens, however, when someone posts something online about your client's medical device or drug that is false? What if, say, this person posts that the drug is dangerous and caused Side Effect X and killed his elderly mother who had diabetes? What if the company knows the drug does not cause Side Effect X, or the drug was specifically labeled warning people with diabetes to not take it? It is these types of situations where a company may feel the need to say something—so others do not take the drug incorrectly and to protect its brand.

The FDA has issued guidance on this type of situation. The agency understands a company cannot be the sheriff of the Internet and correct, much less know about, each instance of someone saying something wrong about a company's product. Its guidance states a company is not responsible for user-generated content on social media platforms it does not operate or control. This means that if misinformation is generated in a tweet or Facebook post, the company has the option, but not the obligation, to post something and correct the misinformed poster. However, if the post is on the company's page, or in a forum the company hosts, then it is responsible for setting the record straight.

Whether the company is obligated to respond to misinformation or voluntarily chooses to respond, the FDA guidance sets forth the following specific things the company must do when responding.

1. Be relevant and responsive to the misinformation

2. Tailor the message to the misinformation

3. Be non-promotional in nature, tone and presentation

4. Be accurate

5. Be consistent with the FDA-required labeling

6. Be supported by sufficient evidence

7. Post in conjunction with the misinformation in the same area or forum

8. Disclose the person providing corrective information affiliated with the company that makes the product

Legal Implications of Social Media Rules

The FDA guidance leaves open the issue of liability faced by drug and device companies, even if complying with the rules. Specifically, "failure to warn" claims are possible for a company advertising on social media. Even if it complies with the FDA guidance, a company can still face liability over its labeling. If, for example, a company decides to tweet and tries to highlight the use of the drug with its risk, what if it only includes the most significant risk and not others? Will that expose the company to a failure to warn claim?

In addition to product liability, social media advertising raises the issue of competitors having the ability to bring suit under the Lanham Act (15 U.S.C. §1525). This law allows a private right of action so a party may sue a competitor for any false or misleading description or representation of fact which

" … in commercial advertising or promotion, misrepresents the nature, characteristics, qualities, or geographic origin of his or her or another person's goods, services or commercial activities." Pharmaceutical companies can face Lanham Act liability for many types of claims, including minimizing risks, broadening indications, overstating efficacy and making comparative claims in the absence of supporting head-to-head clinical data.



Read more: http://www.therecorder.com/id=1202721749266/Following-the-Social-Media-Rules-for-Pharma-and-Medical-Device-Companies#ixzz3VZElZUQy

 


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So What is Pharma’s Ideal Role in Social?

So What is Pharma’s Ideal Role in Social? | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

Patients and Healthcare Professionals (HCPs) are active on social media and closed community forums, but Pharma are relatively inactive. Understandably worried that it will say the wrong thing, sensitive to criticism, mindful of unintended consequences, and nervous of having to report adverse events, pharma usually prefer to stand on the sidelines in a state of social anxiety. Social conversations are influencing patients and physicians; however, what role should pharma take in this conversation?


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Virtual Community, Real Support for Breast Cancer | ASCO Connection

Virtual Community, Real Support for Breast Cancer | ASCO Connection | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

#bcsm is not a typical cancer support group. It has no physical office, no dedicated funding, and no full-time staff. However, it does have regular meetings; every Monday at 9:00 PM EST, hundreds of people affected by breast cancer share their stories, ask questions, and discuss the disease with experts, and it all happens on Twitter. #bcsm stands for "breast cancer social media," and from this pithy hashtag has grown an enormous online community devoted to evidence-based medicine, open discourse, and compassionate support for everyone touched by breast cancer.

 


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Tamer Yacoub's curator insight, March 2, 2015 3:22 PM

This is a great example of Peer to peer support..

 

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The challenges of mobile Health innovation, analysed at the Mobile World Congress - mHealth

The challenges of mobile Health innovation, analysed at the Mobile World Congress - mHealth | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

The seminar on "Global mHealth Marketplace and Innovation" will be a session organised by Mobile World Capital in collaboration with t...


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Jerome Leleu's curator insight, February 28, 2015 3:33 AM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

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5 imperatives of user experience design in mobile health technology

5 imperatives of user experience design in mobile health technology | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it
The Wiki definition of UX design is “the process of enhancing user satisfaction by improving the usability, ease of use and pleasure provided in the interaction between the user and the product.” UX design success in mobile health technologies depends upon the achievement of including the best in reliability, usability, privacy and safety, content and pleasurable experience. I will discuss what I think are five important issues in achieving the ideal mobile technology user experience, specifically for those technologies hoping to enter thehealthcare (vs. consumer) market.

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Takeda Joins #Pharma Digital Accelerator Club

Takeda Joins #Pharma Digital Accelerator Club | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it
Global pharma company Takeda is another example of a leading company that is pursuing new applications of digital technology to develop solutions to the challenges facing healthcare, both here in Japan and around the world.
 
Takeda and its “Start-Up Incubator”
With more than 30,000 employees, a presence in 70 countries and products across a wide range of therapeutic areas, Takeda is constantly looking for new ways to bring new value to patients as part of its patient-centric culture. One of these ways is its approach to digital strategy and technology.
 
Takeda has embedded digital strategy into its DNA with a model it calls the "Takeda Digital Accelerator”," designed to provide investment to new ideas that apply key customer digital trends to the healthcare space, with the goal of generating patient-centric innovations that can drive stronger outcomes. Its foundation is in digital experimentation, where new ways of thinking and working are discovered by testing and learning.
 
First, Takeda assembles the teams and resources needed for this experimentation to take place. Then, different teams work on small, local challenges, which they test using specific hypothesis. These findings are then incubated and shared acros the Takeda community, where other teams can leverage them.
 
Another way this Digital Accelerator model works is through the global ecosystem of external partners Takeda has built over the years. These partners are also helpe make recommendations and solutions to healthcare challenges, and the findings are incubated, tested and shared across the larger network.
 
This kind of forward thinking helps Takeda identify, explore and experiment with new ways of digitizing the healthcare experience in ways that ultimately benefit patients.

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My friend Craig DeLarge (@cadelarge), Head of Digital Acceleration, Emerging Markets at Takeda, must be involved in this. I invite him to be a guest on my podcast show!

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Stephen Dunn's curator insight, March 11, 5:25 AM
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Sandra Boyer's curator insight, March 12, 5:41 PM

My friend Craig DeLarge (@cadelarge), Head of Digital Acceleration, Emerging Markets at Takeda, must be involved in this. I invite him to be a guest on my podcast show!

Melanie COVINHES's curator insight, March 14, 6:22 AM

My friend Craig DeLarge (@cadelarge), Head of Digital Acceleration, Emerging Markets at Takeda, must be involved in this. I invite him to be a guest on my podcast show!

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#ECC2015: WHAT WAS HOT ACCORDING TO THE CONGRESS TWITTER COMMUNITY?

#ECC2015: WHAT WAS HOT ACCORDING TO THE CONGRESS TWITTER COMMUNITY? | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it
Vienna was the place to be this September for all the latest ground-breaking advances in oncology, presented at ECC. With more and more individuals n

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6 ways to use patient-focused apps in your practice

6 ways to use patient-focused apps in your practice | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

he numbers don't lie -- mobile health is thriving. At a time when more adults than ever before use their smartphones to get health information, why are many dentists still not incorporating apps in their practice?According to a 2015 Pew research report, almost two-thirds of Americans own a smartphone, up from about one-third in 2011. The report also found 62% of people used their smartphone as an access point to get information about a health condition.


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Antonio Pastor Serrano's curator insight, August 27, 2015 6:51 AM

APETECE ecológicos, en:  Camino del Pato, número 16 - 29004 MÁLAGA - Telf.  +34  951 286303  - Whats-app  +34  669 765979  -  ESPAÑA , se suma a los adelantos en tecnologías para la salud.

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How consumers use social media for health care education

How consumers use social media for health care education | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it
Infographic breakdown of how consumers are using social media for health care education, and engage with consumers and providers about their concerns.

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Personal Health In The Digital Age

Personal Health In The Digital Age | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

We live in the digital age. You know that already. Two out of three Americans are now smartphone owners, and more than 86 percent of the population is connected online. But while digital has permeated everything from our social lives to how we work and how we shop, it is only starting to touch how we manage health.


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Carline HUSLIN's curator insight, July 7, 2015 6:07 AM

La santé personnelle a l'ère du digitale 

Antonio Pastor Serrano's curator insight, July 8, 2015 6:14 AM

añada su visión ...

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Mobile health increases patient engagement

Mobile health increases patient engagement | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

Digital technology is in the early stages when it comes to "safety net" deployments, but such tools pose tremendous promise and potential in engaging patients in healthcare management, according to new Commonwealth Fund research.

 

Key factors for strong adoption down the line include technical support for integration and device management, evidence-based models illustrating the potential of successful use in care delivery, and payment and reimbursement policies, the report says.

 

The report is based on data collected from an online survey of urban and rural community health centers and clinics, representing insight from 181 organizations.


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#HIPAAandBeyond: Legal Issues in Social Media 2015 HCCA Compliance I…

Explore various legal risks associated with the use of social media in the healthcare industry, including HIPAA, risks for employers, state privacy laws, twitt…

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Medication Management Going Mobile: 2015

Medication Management Going Mobile: 2015 | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

The role that mobile apps can play in day-to-day health and wellness is still something that is being explored — but all signs point to promising results.

 

Now, in a joint partnership, Avella Specialty Pharmacy and leading mobile health provider mscripts have completed a 6 month study to determine how a mobile app can help improve prescription medication management.

 

This study will be presented at the 2015 Armada Specialty Pharmacy Summit, which is being held on May 7 in Las Vegas. The study found that over a period of 6 months, HIV patients were 2.9 times more likely to adhere to their prescription schedule. The mobile app did more than provide daily dosage reminders, but refill reminders, and a wide range of other prescription management reminders and functions.

 


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What is the role of social media in healthcare?

What is the role of social media in healthcare? | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

While social media is moving quickly through the “hype” line it can serve as an important source of information from people who are researching health information online.  In the latest research update we found that people are in fact relying on social media for information, but there is a lot of “trust but verify”.  The key finding is that although patients still trust their doctors they want a better relationship with physicians and they want more face to face time.

The research, just concluded, was for a startup here in the Boston area and I have permission to share top findings.  The research consisted of qualitative (5 cities, 64 people) and quantitative (n=1,254).  Please not thatquant research subjects were compensated with a Starbucks card.

Objective: Determine the extent to which online health seekers are using social media to make healthcaredecisions.

Participants: Online health seekers (gone online for health information within last 90 days and at least 4-6 times in the last year.

Key Findings:

(1) There is mistrust in the messenger when it comes to pharma health information-Although most said they have gone to a pharma product website most sites did not meet all their informational needs and the audience felt that they were trying to be “sold”.  They want to be able to see a list of competitive medications without having to research them online so that they can compare benefit/cost/side effects.

(2) People 30 or younger tended to rely on social media more for health information and connect with others to ask specific information about drug side effects, costs and dosage recommendations.  People 40+ used social media forhelp and support.

(3) Social media is becoming more important in filling the missing pieces for health information, more specifically others experiences especially around negative side effects.  It can both influence whether a patient fills an Rx and is compliant, but it varies by health condition.

 

(4) Patients want and need a “trusted source” to ask key health questions.  As some indicated “I just don’t know who to ask when I want a question answered. I don’t have the time to spend all day searching for answers”.

(5) Very few people actually trust the information they find on social media.  For example, if someone reads about a side effect mentioned on Twitter they are most likely to “want to know more” and “how this could affect me?”.

(6) If a health website has a relationship with pharma patients are more likely to be skeptical of health information on that site.  “They’re not going to tell me the truth if they rely on a drug company for their profits”. A health site needs to be more transparent when it comes to their relationship with pharma companies.

(7) An online community is very much desired for caregivers/patients with chronic conditions and most said they would read the information posted by others, even if on pharma website.

(8) The more serious the health condition, the more time spent online researching health information. Patients want to know “how is this going to affect the quality of MY life”.

(9) Peer to peer social media, health information is most desired, not communication from a pharma company.  However, patients were receptive to pharma posting information about updating health information, clinical trials or “in the news”.  It’s about informing them first so they don’t have to spend the time researching themselves.

In summary, social media use by patients in evolving as people evolve their use of social media. There is still a high level of mistrust of “big pharma” but there is also more trust of smaller biotech companies that are delivering new classes of drugs.

 


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Top World 12 Pharmaceutical companies on Social Media

Top World 12 Pharmaceutical companies on Social Media | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

We present you our last report about Pharmaceutical Companies taking into account their global profiles on Social Media during December 2014. The analysed companies have been selected regarding their turnover volume, and are the following :GlaxoSmithKline, Astrazeneca, Novartis, Pfizer, Sanofi, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, Roche, Eli Lilly, Bristol MyersSquibb, Abbott and Bayer.

Among the 12 enterprises considered for the study, Facebook is the most important social network with 2 millions of potential buyers. The most populars companies are Bayer and Johnson & Johnson because they gather the 80% of the total unique audience.

Twitter is the place where pharmaceutical brands are more active, in spite of their performance not being very high (an average of 78 tweets/month) in comparison with other industries’ activity on this social network.

Pharmaceutical Companies obtain the best results of engagement on Youtube. This network should be part of your online strategy. Johnson & Johnson has the 44% of the total unique users, meaning that it holds almost half of the market.

Would you like to know more about this study? If so, please click on the button bellow these lines and you will find out interesting data for your knowledge.

 


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Tanya Kerr's curator insight, February 22, 2015 9:25 PM

Interesting to see the stats on usage of social media by the pharmaceutical industry.

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3 Reasons Why Digital Matters in Healthcare Marketing

3 Reasons Why Digital Matters in Healthcare Marketing | Multichannel Marketing in the pharma industry | Scoop.it

Everywhere you turn, digital dominates. Articles across the Web proclaim its importance in marketing strategies, and now, digital marketing is unavoidable. Why? Its benefits and ease of use are too great to ignore. But let’s get a little more specific. When it comes to healthcare marketing, why does digital matter?

In this article, we’ll discuss three key benefits of integrating digital marketing into your promotional strategy taking into account customer demands of the healthcare sector.

Before we get started, take a look at these impressive statistics:

77% of online health seekers say they began their last session at a search engine such as Google, Bing, or Yahoo51% of patients say they’d feel more valued as a patient when doctors use social media, blogs, and other digital engagement outlets72% of internet users say they looked online for health information within the past yearBehind using search engines and checking email, the #3 activity people do online is search for health information

Customers and potential clients demand your presence on digital channels, but what’s in it for you as a healthcare marketer?

OPTIMIZED PROGRAMS

Unlike traditional marketing channels, digital marketing allows for the optimization of individual campaigns while the programs are live. Instead of sending out one message to a broadly targeted audience in say, a television, newspaper or radio ad, you can tailor your messaging according to keywords, devices, interests, locations, demographics and more. Digital programs also give advertisers the ability to adjust targeting techniques at any time. For example, a company started a marketing campaign to target woman age 30-50 for their cosmetic procedure. Shortly after the campaign launched, the company realized a better target for their procedure is males over the age of 65. Unfortunately the company has already bought TV and Radio ads on stations targeting women. Digital platforms allow companies to adjust their target criteria in real-time so that there is no wasted budget. Much like an investment portfolio, digital channels allow advertisers to "invest" budget in areas that perform and eliminate underperforming campaigns. Does radio, print or TV provide that capability? Once an ad is printed, filmed or recorded, there is no opportunity to make improvements or adjustments.  

 

Your audience is online, and as such, you should already be engaged in digital marketing. At the very least, you should be strongly considering adopting a digital strategy. Google Think surveys found that 76% of patients were using hospital websites for research, compared to 32% using TV, 20% using magazines and 18% using newspapers.

With the ability to closely monitor digital campaigns and act on real-time metrics and feedback, medical marketers can see better returns on investment.

MOBILE TARGETING

The mobile market is growing at an incredible rate. In fact, this year eMarketer predicts that worldwide smartphone penetration will reach two billion. Google research has already found that roughly 1/3 of patients use tablets or mobile devices on a daily basis for research and/or to book appointments.

The statistics below only go to show mobile’s rising prominence in the healthcare industry:

Of patients who found physicians and private practices on their mobile devices, 44% scheduled an appointment (Source)Year-over-year (2012-13) the number of consumers using mobile devices to search for healthcare services increased 22% (Source)52% of smartphone users gather health-related information on their phones (Source)

You’ve no doubt figured out by now that mobile should be a priority when it comes to your healthcare digital marketing strategy. Luckily, most digital marketing platforms will allow you to target users by device. Just make sure that your ads and landing pages are optimized for mobile devices, or you may end up doing more harm than good.

PROGRAM FLEXIBILITY

As part of the healthcare industry, you know that in any situation, everything can change at the drop of a hat. New market research makes your campaign irrelevant? Marketing budgets get slashed? Management isn’t sold on your execution strategy? This can mean big trouble if you’re dealing with prepaid campaigns and/or advertising programs that can’t be paused immediately.

With digital marketing campaigns, these crises are easily averted. The freedom and flexibility offered by digital advertising methods are invaluable! There’s no need to pay weeks or even months in advance, and you have complete control with the ability to turn these programs on/off with the click of a button.

Healthcare digital marketing is no longer a suggestion. It’s a requirement. Customer demand for digital is constantly growing and the benefits of a digital strategy far outweigh its disadvantages. At this point, it’s a no brainer. Digital marketing matters, and in order for your healthcare practice to be successful, you’ll need to meet patients where they are: online.

 


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Rescooped by Helen Adams from Health Care Social Media And Digital Health
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