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Offshore Alaska Drilling: Private Effort versus Regulatory Constraints

Offshore Alaska Drilling: Private Effort versus Regulatory Constraints | Muhammad Money | Scoop.it

"Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chuckchi Seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive... part of the complexcity is the distant Arctic location and the short summer exploraion and drilling window.... "

 

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

 

- See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

 

Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

- See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

- See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

- See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633


Via MJP EcoArchives
Muhammad's insight:

Price for oil will momentarily decrease as supply increases because of newfound oil in Alaska. Will the price of these findings become outweighed by the revenue from the increased demand of the consumer? 

more...
MJP EcoArchives's curator insight, July 28, 2013 12:54 AM

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

 

- See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

The writer mightn't have had this in mind, but this overview of Royal Dutch Shell's presnce in the Artic is interesting to anyone who follows this sort of thing.


The question of enviornmetnal protection versus economic developement is played out so sharkly in the areana of the Arctic. So much to gain, so much to loose and the stakeholders are far wider than the geographic area. Some say it's a humanity-scale debate.

There are really interesting questions here - if we can get that much economic return and energy from the area, should we be enough to overwhelme the environmental dangeres?

Now, Shell has a pretty good enviornmental reccord and has spent billions in going through tht proper regulatory channels and putting all enviornmental protection practices it can into place. But we all admit we don't quite know all the ins and outs of energy extraction in the Arctic.

And lastly, if we have regulations in place to manage this conflict between Nature and Economcis in the arctic, should we step back and let companies like Shell porcees through and let the jury decided the outcome according to pre-established parameters. Or should we take extra-special consideration because it's the Arctic and start the process all over.

I'm not sure what I think, but I don't like the idea of Clean Air vlolations being used for anything other than Clean Air violations. And I like even playing-fields. If Shell can get through our regulations and requirements and maintain an effective balance between protecting Nature and returning Econmic value, then that's only fair, right?

Don't hate the player, hate they game? But it could mean it's time to change the game....

Muhammad Money
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Rescooped by Muhammad from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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What Makes Work Less Stressful? More Money

What Makes Work Less Stressful? More Money | Muhammad Money | Scoop.it
No wonder your boss looks so relaxed. Roughly two- thirds of Americans are stressed at work. Here's how employers can help.

Via Thomas Faltin
Muhammad's insight:

This Article helps show how easily we are influenced by money, we base our work ethics  and how we efficiently produce products on our levels of income and how much we contribute to the overall productivity is also effected or influenced by how much we get paid.

 

--Suzy Paredes

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Rescooped by Muhammad from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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Why You Should Do It for the Money (and Stop Feeling Guilty About It)

Why You Should Do It for the Money (and Stop Feeling Guilty About It) | Muhammad Money | Scoop.it
For the first five years of my blogging career, I gave all my content away for free. Then I began running some ads, selling an e-book or two, and charging to give speeches.

Via Thomas Faltin
Muhammad's insight:

Work is never free.; and sometimes paying for things make a positive difference too. If you charge for services, it increases your mindset to work harder. Furthermore, customers value what they get more when they have to make an investment in it. Charging for services is part of the business cycle, and in order to survive there must be a tradeoff for what you get and what you put in; in this case, blogging, too, is an occupation.

 

Adina Cianciotto

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Rescooped by Muhammad from Nature + Economics
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Offshore Alaska Drilling: Private Effort versus Regulatory Constraints

Offshore Alaska Drilling: Private Effort versus Regulatory Constraints | Muhammad Money | Scoop.it

"Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chuckchi Seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive... part of the complexcity is the distant Arctic location and the short summer exploraion and drilling window.... "

 

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

 

- See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

 

Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

- See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

- See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

Royal Dutch Shell has spent billions of dollars over six years preparing to drill for new oil in Alaska. The hidden treasure is an estimated 20–25 billion barrels of oil beneath the Beaufort and Chukchi seas.

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

- See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633


Via MJP EcoArchives
Muhammad's insight:

Price for oil will momentarily decrease as supply increases because of newfound oil in Alaska. Will the price of these findings become outweighed by the revenue from the increased demand of the consumer? 

more...
MJP EcoArchives's curator insight, July 28, 2013 12:54 AM

Not surprisingly, drilling for oil in Alaska is complicated and expensive (See map of proposed offshore exploration and drilling in Alaska). Part of the complexity is the distant Arctic location and short summer exploration and drilling window, and part is caused by drifty U.S. federal regulations.

 

- See more at: http://www.masterresource.org/2013/07/drilling-oil-alaska/#more-26633

The writer mightn't have had this in mind, but this overview of Royal Dutch Shell's presnce in the Artic is interesting to anyone who follows this sort of thing.


The question of enviornmetnal protection versus economic developement is played out so sharkly in the areana of the Arctic. So much to gain, so much to loose and the stakeholders are far wider than the geographic area. Some say it's a humanity-scale debate.

There are really interesting questions here - if we can get that much economic return and energy from the area, should we be enough to overwhelme the environmental dangeres?

Now, Shell has a pretty good enviornmental reccord and has spent billions in going through tht proper regulatory channels and putting all enviornmental protection practices it can into place. But we all admit we don't quite know all the ins and outs of energy extraction in the Arctic.

And lastly, if we have regulations in place to manage this conflict between Nature and Economcis in the arctic, should we step back and let companies like Shell porcees through and let the jury decided the outcome according to pre-established parameters. Or should we take extra-special consideration because it's the Arctic and start the process all over.

I'm not sure what I think, but I don't like the idea of Clean Air vlolations being used for anything other than Clean Air violations. And I like even playing-fields. If Shell can get through our regulations and requirements and maintain an effective balance between protecting Nature and returning Econmic value, then that's only fair, right?

Don't hate the player, hate they game? But it could mean it's time to change the game....

Rescooped by Muhammad from TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION
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Infographic: How will the MOOCs make money? - PandoDaily (blog)

Infographic: How will the MOOCs make money? - PandoDaily (blog) | Muhammad Money | Scoop.it
Techday NZ
Infographic: How will the MOOCs make money?

Via Alberto Acereda, PhD
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Rescooped by Muhammad from consumer psychology
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The truth will out: Transparency in businesses and social media

The truth will out: Transparency in businesses and social media | Muhammad Money | Scoop.it

"Transparency is an increasingly popular term but what is it, why is it important and what is its relations to social media? Camilla Oelman explains all..."

 

©


Via Leona Ungerer
Muhammad's insight:

This article accurately represents consumer attitudes of today. This is because many consumers are used to having multitudes of information at their fingertips and they wish to be informed to the fullest extent whenever they're buying a long term commitment in the form of a good. Transparency is occurring as a result of having so much product information out in the open for the public to easily access. As a result, consumers are pushing for more information and are now sharing it with one another through social media. Because of this, product markets are directly affected by consumer reviews and feedback due to their manipulation of sales.

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Rescooped by Muhammad from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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The man who lives without money

The man who lives without money | Muhammad Money | Scoop.it
Irishman Mark Boyle tried to live life with no income, no bank balance and no spending. Here’s how he finds it.

Via Thomas Faltin
Muhammad's insight:

This article makes a really interesting point referring to elastic and inelastic goods. It points out that if we had to make our own things, such as clothes and furniture and food, then we wouldn't be so hasty to throw away and waste what we have. This not only helps you save money, but consequently helps the environment. 

 

-Kelly McCauley

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Rescooped by Muhammad from Energy Efficiency News and Reviews
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Energy efficient cities saving you money

Energy efficient cities saving you money | Muhammad Money | Scoop.it
Your city is helping save your tax-payer dollars by using energy efficient lighting in their city buildings.

Via ecoInsight
Muhammad's insight:

Cities should invest more in energy efficient lighting, not only can we save money but also help the environment! 200,000 dollars a year of savings is 200,000 dollars less of your tax money

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